Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Political Participation

Associated Archive Content : 308 results

Draft of Showdown for Nonviolence

This is a draft, with Dr. King's revisions, of the article "Showdown for Nonviolence" for Look Magazine. The article was published posthumously on April 16, 1968.

Editor of The Nation Offers Unsolicited Advice

The editor of The Nation solicits Dr. King's annual article for the next publication. This year, McWilliams suggests that Dr. King expand beyond the usual update on the civil rights agenda. He then offers advice that King consider moving to New York, where the political environment is right for promoting ambitious programs and his leadership ability would be able to shine.

Facing the Challenge of a New Life

Dr. King uses Greek Philosophy, the Christian conception of agape love, and the need for nonviolent resistance as a guideline of "Facing the Challenge of a New Life" in America. Throughout the sermon, he encourages African Americans to remain committed to the nonviolent principles of the Montgomery Bus Boycott and the precepts of Christian living to facilitate the birth of a new way of life in an America dealing with violent conflicts over social conditions.

Highlander Folk School April 1961 News Release

The Citizen Education Program efforts and past accomplishments are outlined in this document.

I HAVE A DREAM

Text of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech delivered August 28, 1963 at the Lincoln Memorial, Washington, D. C.

Invitation to the 118th Anniversary of Liberian Independence to Dr. and Mrs. King

The Permanent Representative of Liberia to the United Nations, Milton Nathaniel Barnes, invites Dr. and Mrs. King to attend a celebration of the 118th Anniversary of Liberia's independence. The reception was held in New York in July, 1965.

Is Nonviolence Doomed To Fail?

Dr. King enumerates the accomplishments made in the fight for civil rights through nonviolent practices. Additionally, he utilizes this article in the Associated Negro Press to discredit the claim that nonviolence is losing shape in the United States.

Johnson Said to be Choice of Negroes

Kivie Kaplan, the President of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, said that they would be endorsing Johnson for President. Kaplan said their decision was not made lightly, and they will always endorse the candidate who has a principle of equality for all.

Lawyer Fined $50 in Inquiry Ouster

New York lawyer, Arthur Kinoy, was carried out of the courtroom by authorities for disorderly conduct. Mr. Kinoy made history as this had never happened before in the legal system.

Letter from Abraham Ribicoff to MLK

Senator Abraham Ribicoff, Chairman of the Subcommittee on Executive Reorganization, asks Dr. King to appear at a congressional hearing about the problems facing urban cities. He explains that the subcommittee does not understand the full psychological, social and economic conditions that challenge people living in urban areas.

Letter from Activist Carl Brannin to MLK

Social reformer and journalist Carl Brannin commends Dr. King's recent speech in Dallas. Brannin also discusses the importance of the Negro community voting in all elections and reports his experience as a poll tax deputy. He expresses frustration at recent elections that would have had different outcomes if the Negro vote had been strong and united.

Letter from Adam Clayton Powell to the Friends of Black Power

Adam Clayton Powell issues a notice to the Friends of Black Power requesting that they enhance their strategy in order to be effective. He conveys that one person leading the charge of Black Power will slow down the momentum of its purpose. Powell suggests that a National Conference on Black Power be governed by multiple conveners.

Letter from Alfred Gunn to MLK

Alfred L. Gunn requests Dr King's support of Gunn's "new Democratic way of Philosophy." Mr. Dunn also encloses three manuscripts pertaining to riots, the American gun and rifle laws, and the occurrence of racial problems in America.

Letter from Alfred Martin of the Jefferson Democratic Association to MLK

Alfred Martin, representing the Jefferson Democratic Association, offers his support to Dr. King and the struggle for equality in the south. He forwards two documents to Dr. King pertaining to his potential run for Congress and his ideas to assist Negroes in being able to vote. Martin also encloses a donation and apologizes for his inability to send more.

Letter from Anonymous Sender to MLK

A critic writes Dr. King defending President Johnson regarding his decisions for the Civil Rights Movement and African-Americans.

Letter from Barry Diamond to MLK

Barry Diamond, Chairman of Choice 68 at the University of Florida, informs Dr. King that his name will be on the ballot and invites him to speak at the University. Diamond explains that Choice 68 is "a national collegiate presidential primary sponsored by Time Magazine."

Letter from Bayard Rustin to MLK

In a statement to the Democratic National Convention, the authors of this document proclaim that they are seeking freedom. They say that immediate change will only come if the elected Chief Executive is committed to giving life to the Constitution. In an attempt to achieve this, they request that all of the Presidential nominees meet the people's delegation.

Letter from Benjamin Newman, Jr. to MLK

Mr. Newman offers suggestions to Dr. King and Mr. Al Raby regarding voting registration in Chicago.

Letter from Beth Arnold to MLK

Ms. Arnold writes to inform Dr. King that she is head of his campaign committee for a campus movement for the upcoming election. She asks for any campaign material Dr. King can provide.

Letter from Bob Bodie to MLK

Bob Bodie, Choice '68 Chairman at John Brown University, asks Dr. King to send materials about himself for the National Collegiate Presidential Primary. Bodie requests posters, buttons and literature to acquaint the students with Dr. King.

Letter from Charles H. Percy to MLK

U.S. Senator Charles H. Percy expresses his appreciation for Dr. King, while also expressing his hope that the senate will soon pass a housing bill.

Letter from Clair M. Cook to MLK

Mr. Cook, legislative assisant to Senator Hartke of Indiana, thanks Dr. King for his recent letter lauding Senator Hartke for supporting the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Cook also recalls his and Dr. King's experience at Boston University.

Letter from Clara Sturges Johnson to MLK

Ms. Johnson informs Dr. King of her efforts promoting the passing of the "Kennedy Civil Rights Memorial Act." The United States Congress would go on to pass this act in 1964.

Letter from Clarence Long to MLK

Congressman Long writes Dr. King delighted to inform him of his full support regarding home rule for the District of Columbia.

Letter from Claudia Harris to MLK

Claudia Harris informs Dr. King that Dana College is participating in "Choice 68." She also requests material on Dr. King's position regarding the Vietnam War, civil rights, the urban crisis and the federal budget.

Letter from Congressman Augustus F. Hawkins to MLK

Augustus Hawkins, the first black Congressman from California, asks Dr. King to offer suggestions and comments about how to further the aims of the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964. Hawkins reports that the act has garnered resistance from local political leadership because many fear it will undermine their power.

Letter from Congressman Charles Diggs to MLK

Michigan Congressman Charles Diggs returns the proposed plans for the August 28th, 1963 "March on Washington" to Dr. King.

Letter from Congressman Charles Longstreet Weltner to MLK

Democratic Congressman Charles Longstreet Weltner asks Dr. King to help with a project that will commemorate the 200th anniversary of US independence. Weltner requests that Dr. King write a letter in which he discusses the problems that democracy will face in the coming decade. Weltner also encloses a related document entitled, "A Proposal for the Formation of a Committee of Correspondence."

Letter from Congressman Donald M. Fraser to MLK

Minnesota Democratic Congressman Donald Fraser asks Dr. King to serve on the advisory board of the National Committee on Tithing in Investment (NCTI). Fraser reports recent successes in the area of open occupancy housing, such as a project in Boston that rehabilitates homes for low-income families, and a project in Denver that raises seed capital for "integrated cooperatives and other housing ventures."

Letter from Congressman Edward R. Roybal to MLK

California Congressman Roybal responds to a message from Dr. King regarding the seating of the Mississippi delegation. Roybal reminds Dr. King of his record on matters related to civil rights.

Pages