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Voter Registration

Associated Archive Content : 527 results

Howard University Charter Day Observance

Howard University celebrates its' Charter Day Observance with a program that includes a speech by Dr. King. The program also acknowledges the recipients of the Alumni Achievement Award. Such individuals include Ossie Davis and Leroy F. Florant.

Hungry Club Speech

This document is a draft copy of Dr. King's Hungry Club Speech, in which he speaks on the subject "America's Chief Moral Dilemma." He states that the dilemma is "the means by which we live have out distanced the ends for which we live." Dr. King thoroughly discusses the three major evils that contribute to this dilemma: the evil of racism, the evil poverty, and the evil of war. He also discusses the progress of the Civil Rights Movement as it enters a new phase of fighting for "genuine equality."

I HAVE A DREAM

Text of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech delivered August 28, 1963 at the Lincoln Memorial, Washington, D. C.

In a Word- Now

This is a draft of the article "In a Word-Now" written by Dr. King. It was published in the New York Times on September 29, 1963.

Interview about Refusal to Seat Julian Bond

This is transcript of a question and answer period following a news conference at which Dr. King made a statement regarding the Georgia State Legislature's refusal to seat Julian Bond after Bond announced his support of a Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) news release opposing the Vietnam War. King led a protest rally to the state house.

Interview Outline for WAII-TV Show-Profile Emory University Atlanta, Georgia

This document outlines Dr. Edward T. Ladd's interview with Dr. King, for broadcast on WAII-TV's program "Profile Emory University."

Invitation from Clarence Williams to MLK

Clarence Williams invites Dr. King to a campaign kick-off rally sponsored by the Dallas County Independent Free Voters Organization.

Invitation to Harry Belafonte Concert

Dr. King invites friends to a Harry Belafonte concert, which is a benefit performance for the SCLC.

It is Not Enough to Condemn Black Power...

Dr. King addresses the "Black Power" movement in this two-page document. He also explains his thoughts and experiences relating to the tactics and goals of the Civil Rights Movement.

Join the Ranks! Support A Worker

An SCLC field worker writes to gain support for the SCLC so that the organization can fulfill its mission to help blacks "achieve full citizenship rights, stimulate nonviolent mass action, and secure the right to vote."

Let My People Vote

In this statement for the Amsterdam News, Dr. King assures that a victory is in the midst regarding the Senate's recent passage of the voting bill. He elaborates on the objectives of SCOPE, as there is much to accomplish. He ends the statement with the battle cry, "Let My People Vote."

Let My People Vote

Dr. King addresses the problem of voting that Negroes in America are encountering and also talks about SCOPE's upcoming initiatives.

Letter from A.C. Spectorsky to MLK

Editorial Director, A.C. Spectorsky, requests comments from Dr. King regarding an interview with Senator Charles Percy from the April issue of PLAYBOY Magazine. The Illinois Republican
discusses a range of subjects including American military presence in Vietnam, President Lyndon B. Johnson's leadership style, and Negro-white relations.

Letter from Alden Bryant to MLK

Alden Bryant outlines a plan to assist with voter registration in the South by increasing the number of registrars. Bryant details how the process took place in Berkeley, California as an example. He requests a response from Dr. King to the plan.

Letter from Amelia P. Boynton to the SCLC

Amelia Boynton writes the members of the SCLC seeking financial assistance to help purchase a particular piece of land to help start a new sewing machine factory and other projects in Selma, Alabama. Boynton provides details of the history of the struggle of people of color in Selma, and stresses that the land would be used to help teach the underprivileged in the area to help themselves.

Letter from Andrew J. Young to Thomas A. Johnson

Andrew J. Young writes to Thomas A. Johnson regarding the SCLC annual income for the fiscal year September 1, 1963 to August 31, 1964.

Letter from Andrew Young to Edward Lamb

Andrew Young writes to Edward Lamb, acknowledging his efforts in donating and raising money for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Areatha G. Bailey to MLK

Areatha G. Bailey, President of the Highland Park Branch of the NAACP, invites Dr. King to speak at their Freedom Fund Dinner.

Letter from Benjamin Newman, Jr. to MLK

Mr. Newman offers suggestions to Dr. King and Mr. Al Raby regarding voting registration in Chicago.

Letter from Bertha Nichols to MLK

Dr. King is extended an invitation to deliver the keynote address for the 70th birthday of E. Washington Rhodes, Publisher of the Philadelphia Tribune. The Philadelphia Tribune is one of the nation's oldest bi-weekly Negro newspapers and Rhodes is a well-known staunch advocate for justice. Bertha Nichols, Secretary-Treasurer of the newspaper, asks Dr. King to make a special address in honor of Rhodes.

Letter From Birmingham City Jail

This version of Dr. King's "Letter From Birmingham Jail," published by the American Friends Service Committee, also includes the original statement made by the clergyman that prompted Dr. King's response. The eight clergymen described Dr. King's actions as "unwise and untimely." In his response, Dr. King references biblical and historical figures to illustrate why the Civil Rights Movement can no longer wait. He also expresses his frustration with many within organized religion and the moderate white American.

Letter from Charles E. Waring to Mr. Paul Harvey

Charles Waring presents ways to prevent the spread of communism around the world. He also questions previous decisions by the United States government and speculates how the outcome would have been different in various conflicts.

Letter from Charles McC. Mathias, Jr. to MLK

Maryland Congressman Charles M. Mathias thanks Dr. King for his letter regarding the Representative's recent trip to Selma, Alabama. As a result of his visit, Congressman Mathias informs Dr. King that he prepared and introduced civil rights legislation to the latest House of Representatives session.

Letter from Chester Bowles to MLK

Chester Bowels writes Dr. King requesting the use of his quotes to submit to the Saturday Evening Post. Mr. Bowels also regrets to inform Dr. King that he cannot join the national committee to raise funds to fight for Negros voting rights in the Southern states.

Letter from Clare Stover to the SCLC

Mrs. Stover sends the SCLC a copy of a letter she sent to the Hammermill Paper Company following its decision to locate in Alabama. She condemns the company's decision because she feels economic development should be withheld from states that do not uphold federal law. She also questions whether the State of Alabama will be able to honor its promise of tax breaks, which it used to lure Hammermill Paper Company to the state.

Letter from Clarence Jones to MLK

This letter announces that the Gandhi Society for Human Rights, Incorporated is sponsoring a benefit concert, for the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, at Carnegie Hal,l in New York City. Harry Belafonte, Frank Sinatra and Lena Horne are listed as some of the spotlight performers for this concert.

Letter from Clarita Wordlaw to MLK

Mrs. Wordlaw requests that Dr. King instructs the New Bern, North Carolina SCLC Chairman to refrain from demonstrations against Negroes. She also informs Dr. King of actions that should be taken to benefit the Negroes of New Bern.

Letter from CORE to MLK

The Kansas City, Missouri Chapter of CORE writes to Dr. King inviting him to attend their Negro History Week program.

Letter from Daniel Tyler to MLK

Author Daniel Tyler discusses the contributions he has submitted to the National Baptist Convention. He requests that Dr. King send him information on how to assist the cause of voter registration.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rose R. Silvers

Dora McDonald informs Rose Silvers that Dr. King was concerned about an unknown speaking arrangement that he was scheduled to fulfill. Due to a congested schedule, Dr. King will notify Silvers about his availability to speak in the near future.

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