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African Americans and mass media

Associated Archive Content : 52 results

MLK Notes for Speech to the Chicago Headline Club

This is a draft of a speech Dr. King delivered to the Chicago Headline Club. The speech encompasses information regarding the difficulty the media may have covering the SCLC and the Civil Rights Movement.

MLK Remarks on Negro Press Week

In this transcribed radio address, Dr. King describes how future generations will remember the 20th century as a time where righteous people fought for social, economic, and political freedom. Dr. King also states that the African-American fight for true citizenship is not only a part of American heritage, but also the story of people everywhere who struggle for dignity and freedom. Dr. King made this radio address for Negro Press week a the request of Louisville Defender Editor and National Newspaper Publishers Association board member Frank Stanley.

Negroes Hurl Rocks; Cops, Drivers Hurt

An anonymous critic comments on a headline story that details a riot in Lansing, Michigan. Two additional reports are featured in the newspaper clipping including a short piece on Dr. King's visit to Jackson, Mississippi for a four day SCLC convention and a union convention in Kansas City, Missouri.

Our Struggle

Dr. King discusses blacks' struggle for racial equality in America. King explores racist whites' views of "the inferior social, economic, and political position" of the Negro. However, when Negroes begin to reevaluate their position in society and tension in race relations arise, he argues that the Negro begins to "organize and act" against the status quo as evident in the boycotts and sit-in demonstrations occurring throughout the South.

Power Black or White and Christian Conscience

This document is an enclosure that belongs with a letter from Gayrund Wilmore, Isaiah Pogue, Leroy Patrick, Elder Hawkins, and Bryant George to MLK. The writers seek to raise the conscientiousness of Christians in both the black and white communities, and address an existing dilemma between race and power with the hope of bringing about reconciliation.

SCLC Newsletter: August 1963

This is volume one of the SCLC Newsletter, printed for the month and year of August 1963. Several topics are covered including; the March on Washington, Rebuilding Bombed Churches, the WCLC, and Negro voting registration.

SCLC Newsletter: February 1964

This SCLC newsletter covers items ranging from Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize nomination to voter registration drives throughout the country. The lead photo features national civil rights leaders "summoned to the White House for a special conference with President Lyndon B. Johnson."

SCLC Newsletter: June-July 1965

The cover story for this 1965 SCLC Newsletter features Dr. King leading a March in Chicago, and also includes the usual wide gamut of Civil Rights Movement issues. Editor Ed Clayton's column discusses the "loss of fear" among Negroes, who "never again will be systematically excluded from office, or driven back from the voting booth."

SCLC Newsletter: October 1963

This document contains the SCLC's newletter for October 1963. The articles featured in the newsletter include: SCLC's recent accomplishments, details of the Sixteen Street Baptist Church bombing, the seventh annual SCLC convention, data regarding employment for Negroes in Alabama, and gains made in St. Augustine, Florida. Also featured are numerous photographs of Dr. King and notable Civil Rights leaders.

SCLC's Dr. King Ranked by Negroes as Most Influential Leader

This 1968 SCLC news release relays that Dr. King has been identified "as the most influential Negro leader in America today." Dr. King had less than a hundred days before that influence would cost him his life.

Spring Mobilization Committee Roundup of Nationwide Mobilization Activity

This document outlines activities around the country leading up to the April 15 Spring Mobilization Against the War in Vietnam rally in New York City.

Stars for Freedom 1967

This magazine highlights celebrities who have contributed to the Civil Rights Movement as well as the contributions of SCLC and other programs across America. Featured in the article is statement by SCLC President, Dr. King.

Telegram from Prentiss Childs to Rev. Ralph Abernathy

Prentiss Childs, producer of the CBS news program "Face the Nation," invites Rev. Abernathy to speak on the conflict in Vietnam.

The American Jewish Committee

The American Jewish Committee reports on two projects recommended by the Kerner Commission to address "the imbalance between white and Negro in America."

The Civil Rights Struggle in the United States Today

This pamphlet, published by the Association of the Bar of the City of New York, is a transcript of an address delivered by Dr. King titled "The Civil Rights Struggle in the United States Today." In his first speech before the organization, Dr. King recounts the history of the global civil rights movement.

The Dilemma of The Negro

Dr. King provides an outlook on the social and political plight of the contemporary Negro. He claims "The challenge is the fact that society expects, indeed demands, that the Negro be as productive, as resourceful, as skillful and as responsible as his white brother who is not handicapped by oppression". He urges Negro citizens to capitalize on current opportunities for advancement. "The negro must not wait until the dawn of absolute emancipation...".

The Martin Luther King Column

Dr. King discusses the hardwork and efforts of Daisy Bates and her husband Lucius on behalf of the civil rights movement.

The Martin Luther King Column (2)

Dr. King discusses the hardwork and efforts of Daisy Bates and her husband, Lucius, on behalf of the civil rights movement.

U.S. News & World Report: Negro Leaders Tell Their Plans for '64

Past, present and future efforts in the area of civil rights are discussed in interviews of five organizational leaders in the civil rights movement. These leaders are: Whitney M. Young, Jr. of the National Urban League, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. of the SCLC, Roy Wilkins of the NAACP, James L. Farmer of CORE, and James Forman of SNCC.

Vietnam; Whitey: I Will Not Serve!

Rolland Snellings, later known as Askia M. Toure, wrote this article discussing Vietnam and racial inequality. Snellings claims that African Americans are proportionately overrepresented in Vietnam, and he argues that the "black establishment," including the NAACP and the black middle class, is partly responsible for the plight of Negroes.

Wave of Violence Against Blacks

This pamphlet produced by the NAACP, New York Branch, begins with the discussion of a controversial statement made by Senator James Eastland and its adverse affect of increased violence among blacks. Eastland attacked the Supreme Court's desegregation edict by stating, "You are not required to obey any court which passes out such a ruling. In fact, you are obligated to defy it." Newspaper clippings are shown with headlines that illustrate the violence, murder, bombings, and attacks blacks faced.

Women's International League for Peace and Freedom Newsletter

This issue of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom newsletter, Four Lights, was sent to Coretta Scott King. It features an article about the current state of their demonstrations against Vietnam, including a quote by Dr. Benjamin Spock calling on President Johnson to end the attack on the Vietnam War.

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