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African Americans - Civil rights.

Associated Archive Content : 330 results

Letter from Dr. J. H. Young to MLK

Dr. J. H. Young writes this letter to Dr. King about slavery, the Civil War, and President Lincoln. He reminds Dr. King that the Civil War was fought not over slavery, but succession.

Letter from Dr. King to Bert Onne

Dr. King commends Bert Onne on the continued support and the accommodations received on his visit to Sweden. He also acknowledges how grateful he is for Onne's work for the Martin Luther King Fund.

Letter from E. F. S. Davies to MLK

E. F. S. Davies, Head of the Department of Philosophy at Virginia State College, writes Dr. King regarding A. J. Muste's civil rights efforts in the 1930's and 1940's.

Letter from Edgar E. Evans to MLK

Edgar E. Evans communicates with Dr. King to discuss stocks regarding the Farm and City Enterprises, Inc. Mr. Evans further informs Dr. King of the Negro Citizen's lack of confidence within the corporation. He continues to expound on the financial inconsistencies within the organization.

Letter from Edward F. Bell to MLK

Attorney Edward Bell offers his legal services to Dr. King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Edward Gulick to MLK

Edward Gulick of Wellesley College writes Dr. King, expressing his appreciation and admiration for the work Dr. King has done in Massachusetts and elsewhere.

Letter from Edwina C. Johnson to MLK

Edwina C. Johnson claims that the racial problems in the United States are the result of "what is recorded as 'The American Heritage'" and its debasement of African Americans in media, particularly textbooks. Johnson suggests emphasizing the role that African Americans have played in American history. Johnson also provides a list of freedoms that should not be denied to African Americans.

Letter from Elijah Muhammad to MLK

In this letter, Elijah Muhammad expresses the importance of black unity in the efforts for equality. Elijah Muhammad requests the presence of Dr. King and other prominent civil rights leaders at a meeting to discuss solutions to the ongoing struggle against injustice.

Letter from Emma D. Roberts to MLK

Ms. Roberts expresses her support for Dr. King's "campaign for civil rights for Negroes," which she contrasts with the efforts of other groups that involve violence.

Letter from Emmitt LaMarr to MLK

Emmitt LaMarr writes Dr. King about the status of his proposal to the National Dairy Products Corporation regarding Operation Breadbasket. Although LaMarr does not hold an executive position with the corporation, he assures Dr. King his efforts are not in vain.

Letter from Ethelyn Hall to MLK

Ethelyn L. Hall, a student at the University of Houston, writes Dr. King in reference to SCLC's distribution of literature. Hall is preparing a term paper for a sociology class and requests any available literature relating to civil rights, interracial relations, and racism. She is also interested in learning the purposes and functions of the SCLC.

Letter from Eugen Bosch to MLK

Eugen Bosch writes to Dr. King to tell him that, "As always, King was rational and understanding and put the whole thing in the right perspective." Bosch is hopeful that Dr. King will help James Meredith, who had decided to run for Congress in a special election against the incumbent, Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.

Letter from Eula Shaw to MLK

Calling Dr. King "The Trouble Maker of the United States," Mrs. Shaw criticizes Dr. King's methods in the Civil Rights Movement. She argues that a "campaign of love is in order" rather than demonstrations.

Letter from Florida Writer to President Lyndon Johnson on True Equality

This letter from a Florida resident to President Johnson expresses the writer's views on the nation's racial challenges.

Letter from George E. Riddick to MLK

Mr. Riddick writes to Dr. King and thanks him for speaking at Soldier Field. He expresses the support of the Illinois community for Dr. King's ministry on behalf of Civil Rights.

Letter from George W. Chivers to MLK

George W. Chivers writes to Dr. King objecting to the Alabama law that disallows women from sitting as jurors. He compares this denial of women's civil rights to the injustices suffered by Negroes in Alabama.

Letter from Grandison Cherry-El to MLK

Grandison Cherry-El, Minister with The Moorish Science Temple of America, contacts US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbak in reference to discrimination in citizenship in American public schools.

Letter from Henry L. Gerner to MLK

Henry Gerner applauds Dr. King on his accomplishments and what he is doing for the Civil Rights Movement. He also invites Dr. King to speak at Bowling Green State University, a request that is echoed in a letter from Donald Stricker.

Letter from Herbert Jones to MLK

Mr. Jones informs Dr. King of a grassroots civil rights organization (STOP) that seeks to implement a "stay at home" protest nationwide. Mr. Jones seeks Dr. King's assistance to make that happen.

Letter from I.M. Sternberg to MLK

I.M. Sternberg, Western Electric Public Affairs Representative, poses four questions regarding the social conditions of Blacks. Sternberg requests feedback from Dr. King in order to raise awareness and to promote social justice activism among company employees.

Letter from J. P. Brookshire to MLK

J. P. Brookshire supports Dr. King's desire for equality and justice, but is critical of the methods by which Dr. King uses to obtain these goals. He also criticizes Dr. King's stand on the conflict in Vietnam and the draft.

Letter from Jean and Hildegard Goss-Mayr to MLK

Jean and Hildegard Goss-Mayr, of the International Fellowship of Reconciliation, invite Dr. King to speak at a meeting in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. They also congratulate him on winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Jeriann Kelsey to MLK

Jeriann Kelsey writes Dr. King to contrast and compare her experiences raising her son in Mississippi to the Civil Rights Movement and the war in Vietnam. She includes a photo of her son to show that a son "I have seen and touched and loved" is more important to her than "a war I've merely heard about."

Letter from Jimmie Wattson to MLK

An inmate at the Virginia State Penitentiary requests Dr. King's help with his legal situation. The sender informs Dr. King that he is serving a fifteen-year sentence for second-degree murder although he did not get a fair trial. He claims he has written government officials to appeal his case, however he cannot "seem to get any consideration." The inmate asks Dr. King to write him back and let him know what information is required for further assistance.

Letter from John H. Herriford to MLK

John Herriford, a student at the University of Minnesota, offers Dr. King advice on how to improve sit-in demonstrations.

Letter from Joseph Caputo to MLK

Joseph Caputo, a graphic arts teacher from Russell Sage Jr. High School in Queens, New York, collaborated with his students on a booklet entitled, "Let My People Go." The booklet features various illustrations and verses; and focuses on themes prominent to Dr. King's life and work. The accompanying letter includes a dedication to Dr. King and Roy Wilkins.

Letter from Joseph S. Clark to MLK

Mr. Clark, a representative of the United States Senate, requests a written statement from Dr. King concerning a recent Bill (2993) up for election.

Letter from Josephine Baker to MLK

Josephine Baker offers support and encouragement to Dr. King in the civil rights campaign and asserts "without unity there cannot be a solid victory."

Letter from Joyce Armstrong to MLK

Joyce Armstrong of Detroit, Michigan expresses concern regarding segregation and equality in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from L. K. Jackson to MLK

Reverend L. K. Jackson commends Dr. King on his ongoing efforts in the Civil Rights Movement.

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