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White House Administrative Office (U.S.)

Associated Archive Content : 114 results

Letter from Clifford L. Alexander to MLK

Clifford L. Alexander, Chairman for the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, wrote to Dr. King to encloses some clippings from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission News Digest, the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, and the Washington Post regarding the EEOC's hearings on white collar discrimination in New York.

Letter from Congressman Augustus F. Hawkins to MLK

Augustus Hawkins, the first black Congressman from California, asks Dr. King to offer suggestions and comments about how to further the aims of the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964. Hawkins reports that the act has garnered resistance from local political leadership because many fear it will undermine their power.

Letter from Curtis Cosby to MLK

Curtis Cosby, writing on behalf of the Esquires Club, encourages Dr. King to support attorney Donald Hollowell as the replacement for judge Boyd Sloan in order to place a Negro in a high level federal position.

Letter from Dana McLean Greeley to MLK

Dana McLean Greeley, President of the Unitarian Universalist Association, asks Dr. King to lend his name to a letter addressed to President Lyndon Johnson. The letter, which was drafted at the request of the Inter-Religious Peace Conference, requests an interview with President Johnson. Dr. King's handwriting appears on the top right of this letter, saying that he would be happy to allow them to use his name in this context.

Letter from Frank Meranda to President Johnson

Frank Meranda, chairman of the Boston chapter of CORE, writes President Johnson to point out that job tests for the federal government result in discrimination against minorities.

Letter from George W. Monroe to President Johnson

A former employee of the US Naval Air Station in Jacksonville, Florida, George Monroe, writes again to President Johnson regarding an injury he received and the discrimination he was met with in trying to receive his sick pay and disability benefits. President Johnson had given Monroe's complaint to the Commanding Officer of the USNA in Jacksonville, however, Monroe was still facing difficulty getting help and wrote again to President Johnson to ask for his help. Dr.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK

Vice President Humphrey thanks Dr. King for participating in a recent White House Conference, "To Fulfill These Rights," which focused on jobs, jobs training and economic security.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK

Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey informs Dr. King of scheduling complications that will delay his response to Dr. King's request to address the SCLC.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK

U.S. Vice President Hubert Humphrey commends Dr. King on the work of the Urban Coalition. He also informs Dr. King of his intent to work together to meet common goals.

Letter from Imogene Cashmore to President Johnson

Imogene Cashmore responds to Senator Dodd's recent statement in Congress about Moise Tshombe, a Congo politician who had recently been jailed on charges of treason. Cashmore condemns Senators Robert and Ted Kennedy for not trying to help Tshombe, questioning why there has been no negative response to the current government of Congo, which Cashmore charges is rampant with "mass murder and violation of civil rights."

Letter from Jack Michlin to George C. Wallace

Jack Michlin criticizes former Alabama Governor George Wallace for making misleading statements about the American and Confederate slave trade on "The Mike Douglas Show."

Letter from Joe Cheru to MLK

Joe Cheru advises Dr. King to adopt a technique called "organized massive write-in." Using this method, he suggested that Dr. King could channel greater support from people who could not participate directly by being physically present for demonstrations.

Letter from Joe Martine to MLK

Martine shares with Dr. King strong feelings of opposition to the government drafting men for the war in Vietnam. He also comments on statements made by Eartha Kitt at a White House dinner hosted by Lady Bird Johnson, addressing the correlation between juvenile delinquency, crime, and war.

Letter from Katharine Gunning to President Johnson

Katharine Gunning of New York writes President Johnson and copies various dignitaries, including Dr. King. Gunning voices her opposition to the Vietnam War, in particular the bombing campaign, which she views as an escalation of the war.

Letter from L. K. Jackson to President Kennedy

Dr. Jackson produces a copy of this telegram sent to President John F. Kennedy, in which he requests the president use his executive power to suppress violent racial tensions in the South. This telegram was prompted by the bombing of a church in Birmingham, Alabama that killed four little girls.

Letter from Lady Bird Johnson To Mrs. Arthur Stengel

Lady Bird Johnson writes Mrs. Arthur Stengel expressing amazement at her likeness of the President. Sally Stengel was a sculptress whose likeness of Eleanor Roosevelt is permanently placed at the White House. Joseph Mermel contracted Dr. King to inquire whether he wished a similar bust of himself.

Letter from Lady Bird Johnson to Sally Stengel

Lady Bird Johnson thanks Mrs. Stengel for the sculpture of Eleanor Roosevelt.

Letter from Lyndon B. Johnson to MLK

President Lyndon B. Johnson writes Dr. King, thanking him for sending him an advance copy of "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Martha Roberts to MLK

Martha Roberts, of Scranton, Pennsylvania, chastises Dr. King for leading marches and speaking against the war in Vietnam. She expresses to Dr. King that his focus should be on teaching "your people" to learn trades, enhance education and accept gradual change.

Letter from Martin J. McNamara to MLK

Martin McNamara, Special Counsel to the Vice President, informs Dr. King that the Vice President regrets that he is unable to accept an invitation to address the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Martin Segal to MLK

Martin Segal, the Dinner Chairman of the National Urban League, writes to Dr. King asking him to attend the NUL's Equal Opportunity Dinner and accept membership on the dinner's honorary committee. Writing by Dorothy Cotton, Dr. King's assistant, appears at the top right, stating this was the same day that Dr. King would be attending President Johnson's White House Conference in Washington, D.C.

Letter from Martin Shepard to MLK with Citizens For Kennedy/Fulbright Pamphflet

Dr. Martin Shepard, co-chairman of Citizens for Kennedy/Fullbright 1968, wrote this letter to Dr. King after reading the Dr. King felt Robert F. Kennedy would be the best Democratic Presidential nominee in 1968. Dr. Shepard writes that they "share the same feelings about President Johnsons and his insane war in Vietnam" and encourages Dr. King to read the enclosed pamphlet and join their efforts.

Letter from Maurice Mitchell to Neil Sullivan

Mr. Mitchell discusses fundraising for SCLC's Chicago literacy project. HEW recently withdrew their support of the project, but Mitchell is optimistic about potential support from foundations and major donors.

Letter from MLK and Others to President Dwight D. Eisenhower

A group of Southern religious leaders write to President Eisenhower concerning the extreme violence directed towards Negro people throughout the South. They request his immediate action to address the nation's moral and legal framework sustained by the presiding racial climate.

Letter from MLK to Vice President Nixon

Dr. King thanks Vice President Richard Nixon for an earlier meeting. He supports the limited Civil Rights Bill (the Civil Rights Act of 1957) finally passed by the Senate and hopes the President will not veto it. He believes that a sustained mass movement is needed for the bill to be effective and is calling for a “Crusade for Citizenship” in the South to get at least 2 million Negroes registered to vote for the 1960 elections. King lauds the Vice President for his vigorous efforts in support of the Civil Rights Bill.

Letter from President Johnson to MLK on Assuming Presidency

President Johnson writes Dr. King thanking him for his sympathetic telegram as he assumes the Presidency and assures him that he will continue the fight for civil rights initiated by President Kennedy.

Letter from President Johnson to Robert W. Gilmore

President Johnson writes Robert Gilmore regarding the "Democratic Action in South Vietnam" statement of the Center for War/Peace Studies. Johnson assures him that the U.S. government shares his concern for the development of democracy in Vietnam.

Letter from Richard Tucker and Stanford Ovshinsky to Lyndon Johnson

The Oakland County (Michigan) Peace Committee, believing U.S. involvement in Vietnam is a mistake, asks President Johnson and government representatives to stop bombing North Vietnam, promote a bilateral ceasefire, and enter multilateral negotiations.

Letter from Robert E. Harding, Thomas H. Weddington and Celestine B. Bailey to MLK

Robert E. Harding Jr., Thomas H. Weddington, and Celestine B. Bailey detail the many allegations of racial discrimination involving employees from the National Labor Relations Board. These issues have conflicted with the Equal Employment Opportunity and the Civil Service Rules and Regulations. Harding, Weddington, and Bailey request Dr. King's assistance to correct this issue.

Letter from Robert F. Kennedy to MLK

Robert Kennedy writes to Dr. King to express his support for the Civil Rights Movement and the strive to preserve the basic values of freedom and dignity throughout the world. Lastly, Robert Kennedy sends Dr. King a series of speeches he made in January and wish to hear Dr. King's reactions to them.

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