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Peace movements

Associated Archive Content : 164 results

Let There Be Peace On Earth and Let It Begin With me

The program chairman for the Bucks County World Peace Fair invites Mr. and Mrs. King to speak on behalf of the Civil Rights movement. The event will be held on September 12, 1964.

Letter from Alan Sapiro to MLK

Alan Sapiro, Public Relations Officer of Bankers Trust Company, writes Dr. King enclosing a letter he wrote to the New York Times that contains comments the Reverend made during a Peace Rally press conference at the United Nations.

Letter from Alfred A. Haesler to MLK

Alfred A. Haesler of Die Tat or "the fact," a publication in Switzerland, asks Dr. King a series of questions that revolve around the role of hatred in American politics.

Letter from Alfred Gunn to MLK

Alfred L. Gunn requests Dr King's support of Gunn's "new Democratic way of Philosophy." Mr. Dunn also encloses three manuscripts pertaining to riots, the American gun and rifle laws, and the occurrence of racial problems in America.

Letter From Ambassador Avraham Harman to MLK

Ambassador Harman congratulates Dr. King for his aspirations concerning an "American Negro Pilgrimage" to Israel. He praises Dr. King for his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize, and discusses the importance of his leadership in this proposed project for peace.

Letter from American Friends Service Committee to MLK

R. Ogden Hannaford and Kale A. Williams, representatives of the American Friends Service Committee, enclose a pre-publication edition of a book aimed at peacefully resolving the issues in Vietnam.

Letter from Andrew Young to James Bevel and Dave Delliger

Andrew Young writes Revered James Bevel and Mr. Dave Dellinger confirming Dr. King's acceptance to speak at a rally in New York, New York on April 15th. Young further addresses logistical issues that may arise in the execution of the event, as well as how to best increase participation.

Letter from Archie Crouch to MLK

Archie R. Crouch, of the Office for Communications, sends a personal letter to Dr. King using the United Presbyterian Church letterhead. He expresses his support for Dr. King's leadership against the Vietnam War and states that he meets many people that stand in opposition to the war. Crouch encloses recent issues of the publications New and Motive, which highlight the anti-war efforts taking place in the Presbyterian Church.

Letter from Berwyn Jones to MLK

Berwyn Jones offers his gratitude to Dr. King for his strong stance in opposition to the Vietnam War. The letter is written a day after Dr. King makes his famous speech entitled "Beyond Vietnam: A Time to Break Silence" at Riverside Church in New York.

Letter from Bronx High School Student Paul Kylar to MLK

Paul Kylar, a student from the Bronx, writes Dr. King to convey support for his plea for peace. Kylar mentions that he attended a peace parade and how elated he is to know that Dr. King works for all people and not just Negroes.

Letter from Carole A. Burnett to MLK

Mrs. Burnett informs Dr. King that her and her husband's financial support of the SCLC is suspended due to Dr. King's support of the Spring Mobilization and Vietnam Summer program. Though the Burnetts support the peace movement, they feel these two groups "present Hanoi's view of the Vietnam war."

Letter from Charles Merrill to MLK

Charles Merrill, who was Chairman of the Board of Trustees of Morehouse College, informs Dr. King that he is sending a donation of $5000 to be used for "either peace or civil rights work" and he concludes by offering his view on Dr. King's philosophy.

Letter from Charles Sellers to MLK

Charles Sellers, a Professor of History at the University of California at Berkeley, writes this letter to Dr. King promoting the Washington Convocation On The National Crisis. He encloses the proposal that he and Cecil Thomas discussed with Mrs. King over the phone. The proposal details the organized effort to marshal public sentiment against current US policy in Vietnam. Five hundred prominent Americans will be invited to the convocation, to be held in Washington, DC.

Letter from Clarence E. Pickett, Dorothy M. Steere, and George C. Hardin

The Religious Society of Friends, which consists of 17,000 Quakers, decides to send its members to spread a message of "love and goodwill" to both whites and Negroes of Philadelphia.

Letter from Clergy and Laymen Concerned About Vietnam

The Clergy and Laymen Concerned About Vietnam requests financial support for their mission of ending the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Dave Dellinger to MLK

Dave Dellinger outlines the events and requirements for the rally, sponsored by the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, to be held in New York City, New York on April 15th, 1967.

Letter from Don Blaine to MLK

Don Blaine seeks advice from Dr. King concerning the idea of organizing a peace caravan that would travel throughout the United States. Blaine views this suggestion as a way to garner international support for peace.

Letter from Donald Lincoln Cook to MLK

Donald Cook lauds Dr. King's efforts to persuade military forces to leave Vietnam. In response to a speech on Vietnam given by Dr. King, Cook agrees that "the Negro should have special interest in the plight of the Vietnamese." He further encourages Dr. King to stand firm in his position to bring a moral conscience to the nation.

Letter from Dora McDonald to K. Natwar Singh

Enclosed is an article that was originally sent to Mr. K. Natwar Singh from Dr. King. The article discusses Jawaharial Nehru and his fight for peace. In the article, Dr. King expresses the importance of Nehru's beliefs to the United States.

Letter from Dudley P. Babcock to MLK

Dudley Babcock writes Dr. King to express his views on race relations and Dr. King's leadership role in America. Babcock also discusses the march Dr. King is planning to lead in New York to promote peace in Vietnam.

Letter from Durand R. Kinloch to MLK

Supporter Durand Kinloch describes himself as "an average white graduate student" with two children who wants to continue to support Dr. King's fight for civil rights. He stresses that love and nonviolence are needed more than ever as he witnesses a resurgence of hate in 1967.

Letter from Ernst Ketel to MLK

Ernst Ketel writes Dr. King expressing disgust with current political parties and ideals. He requests that Dr. King consider running for political office, preferably president.

Letter from Frank Emspak to MLK

Frank Emspak, of the National Coordinating Committee to End the War in Vietnam, invites Dr. King to a convention to speak about his antiwar and pacifism sentiments.

Letter from Frank Van Leemput to MLK

Frank Ban Leemput, a high school student from Belgium, requests Dr. King provide signatures for the enclosed photos. Mr. Leemput is creating a biography of Dr. King and is in admiration of his political activism as well as achievements in the field of desegregation.

Letter from Gino David Dassatti to MLK

Gino David Dassatti expresses his concern that Dr. King's stand on the war in Vietnam may deem him a traitor. In Dassatti's words, "The blood of these Americans will rest forever on your soul and conscience."

Letter from Harry Belafonte to MLK

Harry Belafonte outlines the details of the African Program to Dr. King. The document references King's future delegation to several African countries and emphasizes the "Afro-American Banking Proposal" as a topic of interest.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to Premier Kosygin and President Johnson

Civil rights activist Harry Wachtel tells Soviet Premier Kosygin and President Lyndon Johnson that the world community depends on their solutions to crucial problems. He charges President Johnson with ending bombing in Vietnam and he charges Premier Kosygin with influencing Vietnam towards peaceful negotiations. Lastly, he asks both leaders to help eliminate war and poverty in the Middle East.

Letter from Harvey Weeks to MLK

Harvey Weeks writes to Dr. King to show his support for Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War. He also offers some advice and makes an appeal.

Letter from Helen Harrington to MLK with Poems

Helen Harrington writes to Dr. King to offer him the use of her poems in his writing and speeches. The poems, attached, are entitled 'Color Book,' 'Viet Nam,' and 'Two Prisons.' In a post script, Harrington urges Dr. King to run for president on an independent ticket, provided a peace candidate is not nominated by the Republican or Democratic parties, adding that she wants no more of President Johnson.

Letter from Homer Jack to MLK

Homer Jack, Director of the Unitarian Universalist Association's Department of Social Responsibility, communicates his support for Dr. King's stance against the Vietnam War. Jack, co-founder of CORE and active participant in the civil rights movement, encloses a report that includes a statement made to the US Inter-Religious Committee on Peace and discusses the courage of Buddhist monks in South Vietnam. He also congratulates Dr. King for his public address made at the United Nations regarding his opposition to the war.

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