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Economic Development

Associated Archive Content : 238 results

John Coleman Bennett

John Coleman Bennett's work is used to flesh out an outline on the issues that plague society. The issues are broken up into five sections: the fact of evil, four problems of social gospel, economic, state and the church, and Communism. Bennett was a Christian theologian, author, and president of the Union Theological Seminary in New York.

Join the Ranks! Support A Worker

An SCLC field worker writes to gain support for the SCLC so that the organization can fulfill its mission to help blacks "achieve full citizenship rights, stimulate nonviolent mass action, and secure the right to vote."

KCLS Radio Editorial about MLK

James C. Garchow, of KCLS Radio, sent Dr. King a transcript of an editorial to comply with the Fairness Doctrine of the F.C.C. that mandates an opportunity to reply to such commentary.

Let's Be Human

Long time civil rights agitator Harry Fleischman wrote this syndicated column for the American Jewish Committee's National Labor Service. Articles within the column took a humorous and often irreverent view of social and civil rights issues around the globe. Fleischman was also the national secretary of the Socialist Party USA from 1942-50.

Letter and Article from D. Parke Gibson to MLK

D. Parke Gibson sends this article in Race Relations and Industry to Dr. King with the intention of including him in a future issue of the magazine. Those involved in the article agree that progress towards having minorities in leadership roles is on the rise, but not fast enough.

Letter from A Friend to MLK

In this letter, "a friend" to Dr. King offers suggestions to help the black race become more valuable to society.

Letter from Abram Eisenman to MLK

This was sent to Dr. King from Abram Eisenman, who is running for President of the United States in 1968. He asks for Dr. King's support in running for president and presents his case on why he should be president.

Letter from Adam Clayton Powell to the Friends of Black Power

Adam Clayton Powell issues a notice to the Friends of Black Power requesting that they enhance their strategy in order to be effective. He conveys that one person leading the charge of Black Power will slow down the momentum of its purpose. Powell suggests that a National Conference on Black Power be governed by multiple conveners.

Letter from Alfred Gunn to MLK

Alfred L. Gunn requests Dr King's support of Gunn's "new Democratic way of Philosophy." Mr. Dunn also encloses three manuscripts pertaining to riots, the American gun and rifle laws, and the occurrence of racial problems in America.

Letter from Alma Opal to Dr. King

Mrs. Alma Opal informs Dr. King that he should use the word "proud," with complete caution. She also sends him a leaflet entitled, "Lawyer Troubles."

Letter from Amos O. Holmes to MLK

Amos Holmes, Georgia Field Director of the NAACP, appeals to Dr. King to reject the invitation to take leadership within the Atlanta community. He feels that the city can solve its own problems without the aid of SCLC or Dr. King.

Letter from Beresford Hayward to MLK

Beresford Hayward, Planning Consultant of the Department of Education in Puerto Rico, writes Dr. King to inform him of the racial climate in Puerto Rico and its issue of Cuban immigration. Mr. Hayward also presents a comparison between the race issues inflicting Puerto Rico and the United States of America.

Letter from Bernard LaFayette, Jr. to MLK

Before Mr. LaFayette leaves for New York to join the Spring Mobilization to end the war in Vietnam, he offer suggestions towards the housing problems that have occurred in Chicago. He states that there should be an urban renewal project that could possibly help low-income citizens afford respectable housing.

Letter from Charles E. Waring to Mr. Paul Harvey

Charles Waring presents ways to prevent the spread of communism around the world. He also questions previous decisions by the United States government and speculates how the outcome would have been different in various conflicts.

Letter from Clare Stover to the SCLC

Mrs. Stover sends the SCLC a copy of a letter she sent to the Hammermill Paper Company following its decision to locate in Alabama. She condemns the company's decision because she feels economic development should be withheld from states that do not uphold federal law. She also questions whether the State of Alabama will be able to honor its promise of tax breaks, which it used to lure Hammermill Paper Company to the state.

Letter from Congressman Marvin Esch to MLK

Congressman Esch expresses appreciation to Dr. King for supporting the anti-poverty program. Attached is a copy of the Congressman's statement regarding the "Economic Opportunity Amendments of 1967."

Letter from David Mocine to MLK

David Mocine writes on the economic disparity in the United States regarding African Americans in relation to their percentage of the population.

Letter from E. M. Blaz to MLK

Mr. Blaz writes Dr. King to inform him about the formation of the Negro organization Chicago Central Service Bureau. This organization is an enterprise that includes a variety of programs that offer education towards consumer loans, mortgage loans, travel agencies, insurance, etc.

Letter from Glenn M. Dunkle to MLK

Glenn Dunkle, Senior Planner for the City of Richmond, Virginia, requests a copy of a bill proposed by Dr. King that addresses slums and housing clearance. The bill will be used by the Richmond City Planning Commission as it studies "methods of stimulating urban redevelopment and new low income housing."

Letter from Harry Wachtel to Premier Kosygin and President Johnson

Civil rights activist Harry Wachtel tells Soviet Premier Kosygin and President Lyndon Johnson that the world community depends on their solutions to crucial problems. He charges President Johnson with ending bombing in Vietnam and he charges Premier Kosygin with influencing Vietnam towards peaceful negotiations. Lastly, he asks both leaders to help eliminate war and poverty in the Middle East.

Letter from Helen F. Gallagher to MLK

Helen Gallagher is addressing the national issues in the United States as it relates to the war. She suggests to Dr. King a personal tax that could possibly go toward initiatives that Americans feel are important. Gallagher feels that this is a way to for Americans to represent themselves when they are unsatisfied with their congressional representatives.

Letter from Henry Wagner to MLK

Henry B. Wagner writes a letter to Dr. King regarding Congress' increased appropriation for the Federal Aviation Agency. Mr. Wagner would prefer that those funds be given to mass ground transportation to increase safety and convenience.

Letter from Herbert Wright to MLK

Herbert Wright writes Dr. King to discuss economic development proposals for the SCLC Chicago Campaign.

Letter From Intergroup Relations Agencies to Ivan Allen

The senders of this letter request a meeting with Atlanta Mayor Ivan Allen to discuss inadequate housing, overcrowded schools, under-employment and "minimal enforcement of the city's building code." The senders represent a variety of organizations and offer their expertise in developing solutions to the problems facing Atlanta.

Letter from Isaac Foster Regarding a Scholarship

Isaac Foster, a student at Queens College, informs his reader of reasons why he should be awarded a scholarship.

Letter from James C. Soutar to MLK

James C. Soutar expresses gratitude for Dr. King's work and requests an autographed photograph to frame along with notable teachers like Paul Tillich, Reinhold Niebuhr, and Abraham Heschel. All of these teachers were heavy influencers of Dr. King.

Letter from Jerome Miller to Andrew Young

Jerome Miller, a field representative for Encampment for Citizenship, writes to Andrew Young requesting a meeting and soliciting direction for selecting students to attend an upcoming event.

Letter from John A. McDermott to Chicago Daily News

John McDermott anticipates discrimination in housing and job opportunities as a result of a proposed federal project for a nuclear power plant in Illinois. Ideally, The Weston Project should create equal opportunities for both black and white Americans. McDermott expresses concern considering the current conditions of racial injustice that exists in Illinois.

Letter from John Sayre to MLK

Mr. Sayre of the International Fellowship of Reconciliation thanks Dr. King for the autographed copy of "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Letter from Leonard E. Smith to MLK

Leonard Smith writes to Dr. King concerning a new venture of the National Sharecroppers Fund, which seeks to invest Negro business captial in Southeastern farming areas to benefit the rural poor.

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