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War and Morals

Associated Archive Content : 125 results

Letter from Abram Eisenman to MLK

Abram Eisenman, a 1968 candidate for President of the United States, requested Dr. King's assistance in his campaign for the New Hampshire ballot.

Letter from Arthur V. Hamman to MLK about Spirituality

In this letter, Mr. Hamman lectures Dr. King on the concept of heaven and hell, asserting that there is no race, nationality, etc., before God.

Letter From Bessie G. White to MLK

Bessie G. White writes to Dr. King, highlighting the strife that she feels Dr. King will continue to go through while fighting for civil rights in the south.

Letter from C. B. Kelley to MLK

C. B. Kelley shares his disagreement with Dr. King's statements regarding the Vietnam War.

Letter from Canadian Friend's Service Committee to MLK

Murray Thomson invites Dr. King to attend an annual conference of world diplomats in Ontario, Canada. Some of the major topics of discussion include the future of military alliances, the growing role of the United Nations, and preventing the spread of nuclear weapons.

Letter from Captain Leonard Larsen to MLK

Captain Leonard Larsen writes Dr. King and attaches a copy of President John F. Kennedy's "Final Plea" regarding his sentiments about the Vietnam War. Larsen hopes to enhance and promote progress towards Dr. King's anti-war campaign.

Letter from Charles Crawford to MLK

Charles S. Crawford expresses his dissent with Dr. King on a variety of subjects, one specifically his stance towards President Johnson and the concept of civil disobedience.

Letter from Dave Dellinger to MLK

Dave Dellinger outlines the events and requirements for the rally, sponsored by the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, to be held in New York City, New York on April 15th, 1967.

Letter from Dora McDonald to K. Natwar Singh

Enclosed is an article that was originally sent to Mr. K. Natwar Singh from Dr. King. The article discusses Jawaharial Nehru and his fight for peace. In the article, Dr. King expresses the importance of Nehru's beliefs to the United States.

Letter from Doug Dodge to MLK

Mr. Doug Dodge writes Dr. King to request his help in identifying an appropriate role in the Civil Rights Movement for a young white male who is seeking to get involved.

Letter from Ed Jennings to MLK Regarding the Vietnam War

In this letter received February 7, 1966, Jennings enlightens King on the pro-war and anti-war activities taking place at the University of Illinois, Chicago. Jennings is a representative of the Students for a Democratic Society(SDS). Jennings is requesting that Dr. King reply with a short message which the SDS can use during their anti-war activities.

Letter from Frank R. Romano to MLK

Frank R. Romano expresses his support for Dr. Martin Luther King Jr by explaining his run as a peace candidate in the 1966 primary.

Letter from Henrietta Buckmaster to MLK

Henrietta Buckmaster expresses her admiration for Dr. King's stance on the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Ira Sandperl to MLK

Mr. Sandperl writes to Dr. King regarding the direction of the SCLC. He suggest that the SCLC continue to represent social change and uphold the principles of nonviolence. However, in order to succeed, Mr. Sandperl believes that it should be done from a universal view, instead of from a Negro perspective.

Letter from James W. Thetford to MLK

A 75-year old man expresses his discontent with the Vietnam War and his belief that America's economic and social problems are inextricably linked to the ongoing military occupation in Vietnam.

Letter from Joe Martine to MLK

Martine shares with Dr. King strong feelings of opposition to the government drafting men for the war in Vietnam. He also comments on statements made by Eartha Kitt at a White House dinner hosted by Lady Bird Johnson, addressing the correlation between juvenile delinquency, crime, and war.

Letter from John Brush to MLK

John W. Brush expresses his dissent with Senator Edward Brooke of Massachusetts for changing his stance on the Vietnam War. Brush also commends Dr. King on his oppositional stance.

Letter from John Maguire to Dora McDonald

Mr. Maguire writes Ms. McDonald requesting a full text copy of Dr. King's speech on "Viet Nam" in New York.

Letter from L. H. R. Rasmussen to MLK

The author agrees with Dr. King's political stance in opposition to the Vietnam War. The "dignity of man" is highlighted as it serves a great importance to the principles of the Civil Rights Movement and the war. The author affirms Dr. King's support from other peace organizations and political parties.

Letter from Minister C. Vernon Lake to MLK About a Vietnam Strategy

Minister C. Vernon Lake writes Dr. King with an enclosure containing a new strategy for vietnam. His plan is built on the shoulders of the World War II "Marshall Plan."

Letter from MLK to D. Martin Fischer about American People

Dr. King thanks Prof. Fischer for "submitting [his] thoughts and words of warning for the American People." Dr. King agrees with the professor's assertion that we should all try to "avoid the excesses and horrors of war."

Letter from MLK to Former Supporters

Dr. King addresses former supporters concerning his controversial stance on Vietnam. He examines the country's colonial history and struggle for independence as contributing factors to America's current military presence in Vietnam. The civil rights leader defends his commitment to nonviolence as an "exceptional moral responsibility" that must transcend international borders.

Letter from MLK to Irene Shunfenthal

Dr. King thanks Irene Shunfenthal for her support. He says that those who seek peace through nonviolence must use every creative means of protest available to achieve U.S. disengagement from Vietnam, and must also urge that nonviolence be adopted internationally to settle disputes among nations.

Letter from MLK to Jacob Nolde

Dr. King discusses with Jacob Nolde the importance of nonviolent peace movements and the malady of the Vietnam War. He stresses that these nonviolent actions should be exercised internationally and America should cease its desire to maintain wide-spread military control.

Letter from MLK to Jimmy Edward

Dr. King acknowledges receipt of Mr. Jimmy Edwards' letter with the kind words concerning his book, "Strength To Love."

Letter from MLK to Johnie Lee Halle

Dr. King informs Mr. Halle that he has no intention of linking the Civil Rights Movement to the peace movement. He asserts that the Vietnamese have consistently been the victims of colonialism, and argues that war and violence are not acceptable means of resolving conflicts.

Letter from MLK to Richard V. Grulich

Dr. King expresses his agreement with Mr. Grulich regarding U.S. foreign policy, asserting that the federal government needs to develop the "moral courage" to admit past mistakes.

Letter from PLAYBOY Magazine to MLK

Playboy Editorial Director A.C. Spectorsky requests comments from Dr. King regarding Kenneth Tynan's article "Open Letter to an American Liberal," which accompanies the letter.

Letter from Prof. D. Martin Fischer to MLK

Professor Fischer writes a word to the American people urging them to be merciful in their acts and deeds, especially as pertains to the Vietnam war.

Letter from Raphael Gould to Coretta Scott King

Mr. Gould of the Fellowship of Reconciliation sends Mrs. King a compilation of writings about and by Phan Thi Mai, a Vietnamese student who self-immolated on May 16, 1967 in an appeal to end the war in Vietnam. Mai "decided to burn herself to make her voice heard by the war."

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