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Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (U.S.)

Founded in April 1960 at Shaw University by Ella Baker and student activists, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) began with a series of sit-ins in Raleigh, North Carolina, inspired by similar actions in Greensboro. Marion Barry was SNCC’s first chairman. The Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) provided SNCC with an $80,000 grant, but the two groups were often in conflict. SNCC participated in the Freedom Rides, voter registration and efforts to desegregate public facilities. In 1963, SNCC chairman John Lewis spoke at the March on Washington. At the time of the 1965 Selma marches, the ideological split within SNCC intensified. In May 1966, Stokely Carmichael assumed leadership and steered the organization away from its commitment to nonviolence and racial inclusion. SNCC became an engine of the Black Power movement. With Carmichael’s departure and the rise of the Black Panther Party, SNCC declined in membership, finances and activity by the end of the decade.

Associated Archive Content : 171 results

Letter from Stephen Goodyear to MLK

Stephen Goodyear expresses appreciation for an inscribed copy of "Where Do We Go From Here?", as well as his enthusiasm regarding Dr. King's attendance at the National Conference for New Politics.

Letter from the Brith Abraham Fraternal Order to MLK

Representatives of the Brith Abraham Fraternal Order write Dr. King in response to anti-semitic statements made by members of SNCC. They ask that Dr. King provide a statement that condems SNCC's statement due to the fact the Jewish community has strongly supported the civil rights movement.

Letter from Thomas Johnson to MLK

Thomas Johnson, managing editor for 'The Forum' at Fisk University, explains that a new chapter of SNCC has recently been charted at the school. Johnson also requests that Dr. King write an editorial for their next publication.

Letter from Thomas Johnson to MLK

Thomas Johnson, a reporter for the New York Times, writes to Dr. King requesting his participation in a symposium to be published in Playboy, regarding the civil rights movement.

Letter from William Caspe and Bruce Fleegler to MLK

William Caspe and Bruce Fleeger, representatives of the Northern Student Movement at Brandies University, inform Dr. King of their past civil rights efforts with Negroes in the south and their upcoming "Fast for Freedom" event. They request Dr. King's written endorsement of the program and ask that he encourage others to participate.

Letter to Baron Allard from Mrs. King

Mrs. King writes to Baron Allard to thank him for the time she spent in Belgium. She thanks him for the gifts he sent for her loved ones and extends an invitation to visit when he travels to Atlanta.

Malcolm X Memorial Flyer

This flyer promotes a salute to American freedom and peace fighters at the Malcolm X memorial event held at Stuyvesant High School. The flyer outlines scheduled topics, speakers, and entertainers.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom Event Program

This program outlines the events for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom rally at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D. C.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom Lincoln Memorial Program

This is the Lincoln Memorial program for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Notable leaders including Dr. King, Walter Reuther, and Whitney M. Young, Jr., will make remarks at the march. Also included is a list of demands, a joint statement from ten organizations and a map.

March to Washington Strategic Planning

This document outlines key strategies concerning the upcoming March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom on August 28, 1963. The one-day civil rights demonstration intends to bring national attention to the social and economic injustices afflicting millions of American citizens.

Mass Meeting on Washington Poor People's Campaign

This program outlines the structure of a mass meeting led by the SCLC at Vermont Avenue Baptist Church in Washington, D.C. Among the speakers in attendance were Rev. Ralph David Abernathy and Dr. King.

Minutes of the Council of United Civil Rights Leadership Meeting

These minutes from the meeting of the Council of United Civil Rights Leadership give a description of the topics discussed. Topics included: meeting with President Johnson, Office of Economic Opportunity memoranda, Inter-organizational conflict and fundraising.

Mississippi Project

The Mississippi Project is developed by SNCC which rooted from the evident white supremacy in this state. The organization sought to take action to eradicate the societal restrictions of the American Negro. The summer project will involve voter registration, freedom schools, community centers, and many more sectional projects.

MLK Address at NAACP 53rd Convention

Dr. King delivered this address to the NAACP's 53rd Annual Convention held in Morehouse College's gymnasium in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King argues that it is imperative to debunk the perceived myths concerning segregation and discrimination in order to foster a society free of racial inequalities.

MLK Address at the 53rd National Convention of the NAACP

This document is Dr. King's address to the 53rd Annual Convention of the NAACP in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King discusses the following myths in this address: time will solve all problems, education can only solve problems of racial conflict, the Negro vote can do little to alter present conditions, and the practice of nonviolence is ineffective. Dr. King also speaks on "disunity," and states "the law may not make a man love me, but it may keep him from lynching me."

MLK Address at the Georgia State Capitol Regarding Julian Bond

Dr. King delivers this speech at the State Capitol of Georgia protesting the legislation refusal to seat black politician Julian Bond. King calls this a "grave injustice" particularly since the state legislature of Georgia considers itself protecting the United States Constitution. Dr. King points out the irony of this act and exposes other irresponsible actions of the legislature.

MLK Interview on NBC's Meet the Press

This edition of NBC's Meet the Press featured Dr. King for a discussion concerning the Civil Rights Movement and its demonstrations. The interview was moderated by Ned Brooks and the panel featured John Chancellor, James J. Kilpatrick, Tom Wicker and Lawrence E. Spivak.

MLK Memorandum: Plans for Selma, Alabama

Dr. King outlines his plan for civil rights goals in Selma, Alabama.

MLK on Student Sit-Ins

Dr. King applauds the students participating in sit-in demonstrations and states that the leaders must develop a strategy for victory. He suggests topics for discussion including: creating an organization, a nationwide selective buying campaign, training for jail not bail, further exploration of nonviolence, and taking the freedom struggle into every community without exception. These suggestions led to the formation of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).

MLK on the Seating of Julian Bond

Georgia State Legislature has refused to seat Representative-Elect Julian Bond. Dr. King expresses his disdain for the social injustice. His plan of action is to combat this prejudice by rallying members of the white and black community to engage in protest.

MLK Press Statement After Receiving Nobel Prize

Dr. King issued this statement to the press upon return from receiving the Nobel Peace Prize in Norway. In addition to declaring how he plans to distribute his prize winnings, Dr. King discusses the progress of the Civil Rights Movement.

MLK Reflections on the Selma March, Bloody Sunday, SNCC and Communism

Dr. King discusses the Selma to Montgomery march, calling it the "most powerful and dramatic civil rights protest ever held in the south." Dr. King also addresses criticism of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee's tactics. He concludes these notes by responding to claims that he has communist ties, denying any foreign or left-wing influence on his actions. Of Bayard Rustin and C. T.

MLK's Public Statement Regarding Julian Bond

Dr. King expresses his indignation for the State Legislatures refusal to seat Representative-Elect Julian Bond. Dr. King asserts that there are obvious racial overtones in the State Legislatures decisions since Mr. Bond received 82 percent of the votes in his district. Dr. King will commence direct action due to the state of urgency.

MSGR. Victor G. Moser's Statements Relating to Selma-Montgomery March

Victor G. Moser recounts the activities that took place during the march on Montgomery ,which was one of a serious, dedicated, even religious commitment to a project which would really bring out the serious injustice being perpetrated upon a persecuted and disadvantaged people.

Negro Leaders On "Meet the Press"

This is a transcription of the Meet the Press interview with Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, Roy Wilkins, and other leaders representing civil rights organizations. The nationally broadcasted news segment covered many pertinent social topics including demonstrations and riots, city movements, the Vietnam War, and the progression of the Civil Rights Movement. The interview structure consisted of a panel, which prompted relevant questions, and moderator Edwin Newman.

New Left Versus Old Liberals in Battle for Dr. King's Soul

Conservative syndicated columnists Rowland Evans and Robert Novak claim that Dr. King's soul is being challenged by various factions with whom he has associated. Evans and Novak question Dr. King's relationship with Stokely Carmichael by reminding him of his promise never to work with Mr. Carmichael again.

New York Post: A Poor Show

The Child Development Group in Mississippi (CDGM) was a head start project created in 1965 with the help of a federally funded grant. The program not only specialized in child development, but sought to increase community involvement. In late 1966, Mississippi Senator Stennis "opened fire" on the program, charging those involved with malpractice. Consequently, Sargent Shiver, Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity, formed a "more respectable anti-poverty unity" called Mississippi Action for Progress to takeover CDGM.

News from SCEF Regarding Police Raids

As a result of a police raid on the offices of the SCEF and its officers, two of their top officers were arrested and their records and papers were seized. The White Citizens Council praised the Louisiana Joint Legislative Committee on Un-American Activities for instigating the raids, while numerous other committees strongly denounced the raids.

News from Southern Conference Educational Fund

This statement from the Southern Conference Educational Fund discusses the details regarding the arrest of Charles McDew and Robert Zellner in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

News from Southern Conference Educational Fund

The SCEF Executive Board asserts that the attack of black power is injuring the plight of democracy in the United States. The SCEF board declared "the idea of black power has a long and honorable history but it is currently being misrepresented in the news media in the United States."

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