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Faith

Associated Archive Content : 137 results

Faith

Dr. King quotes English author and priest William Ralph Inge's "Lay Thoughts of a Dean," as well as English soldier and essayist Donald Hankey.

Faith

Dr. King agrees with Justin Martyr on faith and rationality.

Faith

Dr. King quotes William James' "The Sentiment of Rationality."

Faith

Dr. King quotes an excerpt from William Adams Brown's "Beliefs that Matter."

Faith and Reason

Dr. King references Albert Knudson's "The Doctrine of God."

Faith As A Way of Knowing (Wieman)

Dr. King cites Henry Nelson Wieman's "The Source of Human Good" on faith as a way of knowing.

Faith in Man

Dr. King discusses people's general lack of faith in man. He asserts that because of Christianity one can have faith in man because "man's plight is never so low that he can't do better."

Fisk News: The Montgomery Story

This publication of Fisk News features one of Dr. King's speeches on page five. The speech is entitled "The Montgomery Story," and was delivered at the 13th Annual Institute of Race Relations at Fisk University. Dr. King commences to share of Rosa Parks' refusal to move from her bus seat and help begin the historic Montgomery Bus Boycott. Blacks boycotted public transportation for 7 months in Montgomery, Alabama and achieved success in changing the city's discriminatory practices.

Fleeing From God

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "Fleeing From God." King references the biblical scripture Jonah 1:3 as the foundation of his sermon, asserting that one cannot flee from God or His will.

Gethsemane

Dr. King notes the Biblical story of Jesus' experience before his crucifixion. He uses the parable to speak to the human experience of pain and the faith one must have in God. Jesus went to Gethsemane to pray. He brought apostles John, James, and Peter and had them take watch while he prayed in the garden. When Jesus returned, his friends were sleeping. At this moment, Jesus realized their indifference to his agony. Though standing in pain and loneliness, Jesus used his faith in God to accept his situation as it was, with no efforts of escape.

God

Dr. King quotes Dr. William Temple, stating that "God minus the world equals God; the world minus God equals nothing."

God

Dr. King uses a series of scriptures from the Book of Psalms and I Chronicles to show God's abiding love and faithfulness.

God Pronounces Judgement of America

God Pronounces Judgment of America is allegedly a prophecy from God, through his servant Reverend R. G. Hardy, given on Christmas Day 1966. It reveals that a horrible earthquake and war are in the future.

How My Mind has Changed in the Last Decade

Dr. King writes notes on how his mind has changed in recent years. King states that while his main focus was on theology and philosophy, he also focused on social ethics. According to Dr. King, segregation is a tool that exploits the Negro and poor whites. He saw similarities with the liberation of India's people from Britain and asserts that his trip to India cultivated his ideologies on nonviolence.

How to Believe in a Good God in the Midst of Glaring Evil

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "How to Believe in a Good God in the Midst of Glaring Evil." In this sermon, King asserts that in many instances the facts of life contradicts a believer's faith, and poses reasons why one should hold firm to their faith.

I HAVE A DREAM

Text of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech delivered August 28, 1963 at the Lincoln Memorial, Washington, D. C.

Immortality

Dr. King quotes philosopher John Fiske regarding the topic of immortality.

Incarnation

Here, Dr. King notes that the problem of Jesus' Incarnation "boils down to" one single question.

Index card written by MLK regarding Faith

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines another thinker's insights on the subject of faith. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for quick reference to quotations, ideas, and bible verses, among other things. Material covered on these index cards includes topics such as theology, philosophy, and history. Some material from these reference notes would later emerge in his speeches and sermons.

Is Nonviolence Effective

Rev. P. R. Regamey writes a paper that discusses whether or not nonviolence is effective. He uses Gandhi's methods as a basis for the paper. Rev. Regamey also addresses the broader theory and practice of nonviolence.

Isaiah

Dr. King references the Old Testament biblical Book of Isaiah regarding topics like ritual sacrifice, knowledge, social ethics, and the doctrine of man.

It's Hard to Be a Christian

Dr. King outlines his sermon entitled "It's Hard to Be a Christian." King asserts that in order for one to be a fully committed Christian he or she must subordinate their ego and prioritize their concern for God's kingdom.

Job

Dr. King reflects on the purpose of suffering in the Book of Job and how Job deals with it.

Laymen's Retreat League

This letter from Thomas Gedeon serves as a response to a notion and tentative dates for a clergy retreat including Dr. King.

Letter from a Concerned Christian to MLK

This letter penned by "Concerned Christian" informs Dr. King of a change in the course of the Civil Rights Movement. The "Concerned Christian" makes note of the increased amount of violence in the city of Baltimore and reprimands Dr. King's "reduced faith in God."

Letter from an Asylum Inmate to MLK Seeking Assistance

Paul Douglas Ware, an untried inmate, requests Dr. King's "understanding, moral support, and possible assistance." Mr. Ware informs Dr. King of detailed information regarding his unjust treatment, his personal life, his present state of mind and most importantly his desire to have a stronger bond with "his own people."

Letter from Anna Hedgeman to MLK

Dr. Hedgeman writes Dr. King to express her support for Dr. King's quality service that he has given America. He then targets Dr. King on a letter he received on the representation of the slogan "Black Power." Dr. Hedgeman feels the slogan relates strongly towards extremists and black supremacy. Lastly, she encloses a small contribution and two letters.

Letter from Blanche Shropshire to MLK

Mrs. Shropshire expresses her gratitutde to Dr. King for his inspiring words at an address delivered in Buffalo, New York.

Letter from Canary McKay to MLK

Canary McKay shows her appreciation to Dr. King for the progress made as a result of the Civil Rights Movement. She also extends an invitation for King to speak at her church.

Letter from Claudette Holston to MLK

Claudette Holston writes Dr. King expressing the plight she has faced as a black woman in Michigan and Georgia. She asks Dr. King, "how would you feel if I was your daughter or wife?" and strongly urges him to write back.

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