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Bombings

Associated Archive Content : 180 results

Letter from Katharine Gunning to President Johnson

Katharine Gunning of New York writes President Johnson and copies various dignitaries, including Dr. King. Gunning voices her opposition to the Vietnam War, in particular the bombing campaign, which she views as an escalation of the war.

Letter from Kendall Bryant to MLK

A fourth grader from Germantown Friends School in Philadelphia writes Dr. King to inform him of a donation drive conducted by "Mrs. Magaziner's 4th grade class" for the rehabilitation of the 16th Street Baptist Church. The student requests a response letter from Dr. King to take back to the class.

Letter from L. K. Jackson to President Kennedy

Dr. Jackson produces a copy of this telegram sent to President John F. Kennedy, in which he requests the president use his executive power to suppress violent racial tensions in the South. This telegram was prompted by the bombing of a church in Birmingham, Alabama that killed four little girls.

Letter from Linda Gillies to MLK

Chairman of the Choice '68 Steering Committee, Linda Gillies asks Dr. King about his stance on referendum issues. Topics that Dr. King was asked to respond to included King's opinion on what military action the U.S. should have in Vietnam, the course of action the US should pursue regarding bombing North Vietnam and governmental spending.

Letter from Martin Shepard to MLK with Citizens For Kennedy/Fulbright Pamphflet

Dr. Martin Shepard, co-chairman of Citizens for Kennedy/Fullbright 1968, wrote this letter to Dr. King after reading the Dr. King felt Robert F. Kennedy would be the best Democratic Presidential nominee in 1968. Dr. Shepard writes that they "share the same feelings about President Johnsons and his insane war in Vietnam" and encourages Dr. King to read the enclosed pamphlet and join their efforts.

Letter from Mary Ann Johnson to MLK

Mary Ann Johnson of Boston thanks Dr. King for taking a stand against the bombing in Vietnam. Johnson stresses that funds supplied for the war cripples the wages of working people in America.

Letter from MLK Regarding Southern Christian Leadership Conference

In this letter, Dr. King appeals to the potential donors of the S.C.L.C. Dr. King also highlights a number of activities the S.C.L.C. has organized with the purpose of securing voting rights and raising funds for churches burned by segregationists.

Letter from MLK Requesting Support

Dr. King sent this letter soliciting donations for the SCLC following the Civil Rights Act of 1964. He says there is gratifying compliance with desegregation in some areas and renewed defiance elsewhere. ?Responsibility is as important as militancy,? King writes, in challenging segregation and discrimination. The SCLC pledges both.

Letter from MLK to Lester Kendel Jackson

Dr. King sends a check to Dr. Jackson at St. Paul Baptist Church in Gary, Indiana, to aid with reconstruction of the church.

Letter from MLK to Raymond Beard

Dr. King thanks Raymond Beard for his statement on peace and Christianity. He believes that the Fellowship of Reconciliation can distribute Beard's message to fellow clergyman around the country. In Dr. King's view, "...we must embark upon positive programs of international aid and amity to strenghten the bonds of world community and to eliminate the conditions which historically have led nations to start wars."

Letter from MLK to Rev. Charles B. McConnell

Dr. King thanks Rev. McConnell for his words of encouragement and financial contribution following the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. Dr. King explains that Americans of all races and ethnicities must join together in this common cause to achieve American community.

Letter from Mrs. R.B. Hassell to MLK

Writing from Memphis, Tennessee, Mrs. Hassell expresses her love for America and her concern regarding the cruel treatment many have experienced throughout the world. She offers encouragement to Dr. King and other preachers who are advocates for peace.

Letter from Richard Tucker and Stanford Ovshinsky to Lyndon Johnson

The Oakland County (Michigan) Peace Committee, believing U.S. involvement in Vietnam is a mistake, asks President Johnson and government representatives to stop bombing North Vietnam, promote a bilateral ceasefire, and enter multilateral negotiations.

Letter from SANE's Dr. Benjamin Spock to MLK

Dr. Benjamin Spock requests the support of the SCLC for "A Rally for Peace in Vietnam." Dr. Spock informs Dr. King, that the rally will advocate for immediate actions concerning the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Sheldon L. Gutman to MLK

Sheldon L. Gutman writes Dr. King urging him to utilize his prominence by consistently speaking out about the issues of the world. Gutman also expresses concern regarding America's potential retaliation to China detonating a hydrogen bomb.

Letter from the Dutch Vietnam Committee to MLK

An unknown author writes Dr. King on behalf of the Dutch Vietnam Committee to seek assistance in stopping the bombing in Vietnam. The committee requests Dr. King record a few powerful remarks which will hopefully influence ending the war.

Letter from the Faculty of the Tuskegee Institute to President Kennedy

Members of the faculty and staff of Tuskegee Institute issue a plea to President John F. Kennedy to intervene in the Birmingham crisis of 1963. They request that the President use an upcoming speech to discuss Constitutional rights, send the FBI to Alabama to investigate "charges of police brutality," and revoke federal funds that support segregation and persuade business leaders to desegregate public facilities.

Letter from the Secretary General of the Oversees Vietnamese Buddhist Association

In this correspondence VO VAN AI request assistance in denouncing the massacre at the School of Youth For Social Services in Vietnam.

Letter to Rev. Thomas Thrasher from MLK and Others

Dr. King and other civil rights leaders contact the President of the Montgomery Ministerial Association, Rev. Thomas Thrasher, to compliment him on his statement subsequent to the bombings in Alabama.

Liberation: Our Struggle

Dr. King contributes an article to the "Liberation" publication explaining the reasons for the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott. He conveys the issues involving segregation on buses, the demise of Negro inferiority and the miscalculations of white Montgomery civic leaders. According to Dr. King, "Every attempt to end the protest by intimidation, by encouraging Negroes to inform, by force and violence, further cemented the Negro community and brought sympathy for our cause from men of good will all over the world."

Memo on Strategy of the Integration Movement

An anonymous writer pens a comprehensive strategy that focuses on achieving racial integration. Within the text of the document, the writer identifies various political, social and economical developments that are needed in order to end racially stemmed inequalities for African Americans.

Message from James Farmer About March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

James Farmer issues a message from the Donaldsonville Jail regarding the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. He regrets that he is unable to attend the event, but he supports the goals of the March.

MLK Address at the National Biennial Convention

Dr. King delivers this speech at the National Biennial Convention of the American Jewish Congress. The convention took place May 1, 1958 in Miami Beach, Florida. Dr. King discusses how the Jewish and Negro communities are unified by the escape of bondage. They share a common fight against the deadly enemies of oppression. He continues on to discuss the things that need to be done in order for African Americans to reach great potential along with the importance of fighting for and obtaining democracy.

MLK Address to Chicago's Peace Parade and Rally

Dr. King discusses the nation's present-day involvement with Vietnam. The civil rights leader claims that as a nation founded on democratic and revolutionary ideas, the United States has a moral obligation to intervene on behalf of those suffering and dying throughout the world.

MLK Address to Southern Association of Political Scientists

Dr. King addresses the Southern Association of Political Scientists in November of 1964. This address consists of the accomplishments made because of the Civil Rights Movement and areas that society needs to improve upon.

MLK Address to the Congress of Federated Organizations

Dr. King addresses the participants in the COFO Mississippi Summer Freedom Project in 1964. He pledges the full support of the SCLC to aid in their mission to register Negro voters and educate them in the process of political participation. In spite of bombings, arrests, and other forms of intimidation, Dr. King urges the members of COFO to persistently work to eliminate the roadblocks to full citizenship.

MLK Draft Text Retrieved by T.D. Johnston

The document is a dedication from T. D. Johnston of Huntsville, Alabama to the King Center. Mr. Johnston acknowledges being on an Eastern Airline plane with Dr. King in 1961, where he noticed that Dr. King tossed a speech text that he found. He decided to hold on to the document for preservation and donated it to the King Center. Martin Luther King, III received the document on behalf of the King Center.

MLK Interview with Glenn E. Smiley

This early (1956) interview with Dr. King has as its center the Montgomery Bus Boycott, a seminal event in Dr. King's career and the Civil Rights Movement.

MLK Remarks at the Launching of SCLC's Crusade for Citizenship

Dr. King delivered this speech at a launch meeting for the Crusade for Citizenship in Miami, Florida. He discusses the denial of African Americans' right to vote by relating it to other former disfranchised Americans such as those who did not own property and women. Dr. King discusses the hypocrisy in some American officials' advocacy of democratic election in other European countries as well as the social and economic welfare of all Americans.

MLK Sermon: Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam

Dr. King gives a sermon on why he does not support the war in Vietnam.

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