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People in Action: Sit In, Stand In, Wade In, Kneel In

In this article in the New York Amsterdam News May 25, 1963, Dr. King says that, through the ballot, Negro voters can change the political structure of the South. He states that for democracy to live, segregation must die; therefore, every form of nonviolent direct action will be used to dismantle it in the South, where it is visible, and in the North, where it is more hidden. Finally, he points out that modern psychologists use the term “maladjusted.” He is glad to be “maladjusted” to segregation, religious bigotry, economic injustice, and militarism.

People in Action: The South -- A Hostile Nation

In his regular column for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King discusses the unfair economic conditions of Negroes in America. He further explains how the employment rate of Negroes in America contribute to economic hardships.

Power Black or White and Christian Conscience

This document is an enclosure that belongs with a letter from Gayrund Wilmore, Isaiah Pogue, Leroy Patrick, Elder Hawkins, and Bryant George to MLK. The writers seek to raise the conscientiousness of Christians in both the black and white communities, and address an existing dilemma between race and power with the hope of bringing about reconciliation.

Prayer Pilgrimage

Various quotes are cited surrounding Dr. King's perception on love, nonviolence, spirituality, Montgomery, and more. Dr. King elaborates on the history of Montgomery and its direct relation to slavery. Ebony Magazine releases the exclusive eight-point "Plan for Freedom" for Montgomery, calling Negros to mobilize for an all-out assault on segregation."The Death of Evil' is also cited which correlates such evil with details from the book of Exodus.

Preview of the "Dream" at Detroit March

Two months before the famous "I Have a Dream" speech at the March on Washington, King used many of the same words, rhetorical techniques, and themes. King expresses gratitude and inspiration and warns against hatred and separatism at what he thinks is the largest US demonstration to date, a march in Detroit June 23, 1963. The legacy of slavery and segregation induced a false sense of inferiority in Negroes.

Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution

Dr. King delivers the commencement address at Oberlin College in Ohio on June 14, 1965. Nothing is more tragic, he says, than sleeping through a significant period of social change by failing to adopt the new mental attitudes that the new situation demands. He suggests that to remain awake through a great revolution one must embrace a global perspective and work for peace, racial justice, economic justice and brotherhood throughout the world.

Remarks by MLK at the Freedom House Annual Dinner

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for being honored by Freedom House. He also pays tribute to the life and work of John F. Kennedy while encourging others to honor his memory through their dedication to civil rights.

Remarks by MLK in Acceptance of the Spingarn Medal

In his acceptance speech for the Spingarn Medal, Dr. King remarks about the need for continuing the fight for social justice and equality around the world. He acknowledges the work of NAACP along with protesters as they continue to be on the frontline in addressing the nation's social ills.

Resolution of the SCLC Board of Directors

The SCLC Board of Directors issues a resolution at its Tenth Annual Convention that lists what it considers "flagrant injustices" which violate the rights of American workers. As part of the resolution, the SCLC requests that Congress make corrections to the National Labor Relations Act.

Revelation Baptist Church Program for "A Knock at Midnight"

This program outlines the Revelation Baptist Church Sunday Worship Service on September 27, 1964. The booklet lists Reverend Fred L. Shuttlesworth, co-founder of the SCLC, as the church's presiding minister. On this occasion, Dr. King addressed the congregation from the pulpit with the sermon "A Knock at Midnight," which had been published the year before. Dr. King's handwritten notes seem to outline another talk on the back cover.

Revision on Preferential Treatment

The document contains an addition to a chapter for Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" In this insert, Dr. King seeks to clear up questions surrounding preferential treatment for negroes. According to the text, "The program of special aid for Negroes and other deprived groups is in no sense discrimination in reverse."

Revolution and Redemption

This document contains the address, "Revolution and Redemption," given by Dr. King in Amsterdam. Dr. King discusses the concerns of the "Gospel of Jesus Christ." He states there are two aspects of the world that must never be forgotten: "this is God's world," and that Jesus Christ gave his life for redemption.

SCLC Brochure: This is SCLC

SCLC outlines its history, achievements, initiatives and leadership in this brochure.

SCLC Citizenship Workbook

This workbook is an extension of the SCLC Conference Citizenship program "designed to acquaint citizens with the way in which our government is run and to help them meet voting requirements." This resource tool features a number of vocabulary-building, arithmetic, reading comprehension, and spelling exercises to better equip voters with the knowledge to "fight against prejudice and loss of human rights in education."

SCLC Newsletter: February 1964

This SCLC newsletter covers items ranging from Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize nomination to voter registration drives throughout the country. The lead photo features national civil rights leaders "summoned to the White House for a special conference with President Lyndon B. Johnson."

SCLC Newsletter: June-July 1965

The cover story for this 1965 SCLC Newsletter features Dr. King leading a March in Chicago, and also includes the usual wide gamut of Civil Rights Movement issues. Editor Ed Clayton's column discusses the "loss of fear" among Negroes, who "never again will be systematically excluded from office, or driven back from the voting booth."

SCLC President's Report - MLK

Delivered at the Tenth Annual Convention of the SCLC, Dr. King presents the annual report for the organization. King addresses several elements of the Civil Rights Movement as he discusses the successes, plans, goals, and vision of the SCLC in relation to the wider movement it represents.

Senate Subcommittee on Urban Reorganization Statement

In a hearing on the plight of inner cities, Dr. King focuses on injustices in the urban ghettoes, stating that the problem is not primarily a race issue but an economic one. He calls for a rebalancing of national priorities and links the plight of America's poor to the squandering of resources on war.

Seventh Annual Gandhi Memorial Lecture

Howard University presents Dr. King as its primary speaker for their seventh annual Gandhi Memorial Lecture in 1966. Dr. King traces the slow but meaningful progress society has made from slavery to the current civil rights movement. However, he notes that the present challenges in achieving equality involve not only the silence of individuals of good will but also the conditons that keep the Negro inferior.

Shattered Dreams

In a sermon entitled "Shattered Dreams", Dr. King opens with a passage from Romans 15:24. The Reverend continues with the expansion of hopes and the contrast of shattered dreams. Delivering this message from a theological vantage point, Dr. King closes with "Christian faith makes it possible for us nobly to accept that which cannot be changed, to meet disappointments and sorrow with an inner poise..."

Speeches by the Leaders

In this booklet, the NAACP compiled famous speeches from the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Included are speeches from A. Philip Randolph, Roy Wilkins, James Farmer, Rev. Eugene Carson Blake, Rabbi Joachim Prinz, Whitney M. Young, Matthew Ahmann, John Lewis, Walter Reuther, and Dr. King. The booklet concludes with a pledge and a picture of the throng of supporters that attended the event. test

St. Augustine, Florida: 400 Years of Bigotry and Hate

The SCLC compiled and published this pamphlet about St. Augustine, Florida, describing a long history of racial discrimination and segregation supported by Northern tourism.

Statement by Reverend Jesse Jackson

Reverend Jesse Jackson gives a report regarding SCLC's Operation Breadbasket. Reverend Jackson states, "There are no riotous fires set aflame in this country that can be put out with water from a rubber hose; the flames must be extinguished by money from an economic hose."

Statement Concerning Skin Color Differences

The author expounds on the color differences of eyes, plants, and animals to identify the faulty logic of bigotry in America.

Statement of the Committee for Emmett Doe

The Committee for Emmett Doe issues a statement both explaining Doe's situation and also asking for support. Doe, an Army paramedic, faced court-martial for allegedly cursing a white superior. He was later acquitted of the charges.

Statement on Election Returns and White Backlash

Sunday with Martin Luther King, Jr. Radio Sermon on WAAF-AM Chicago, IL

This copy of Dr. King's segment on WAAF-AM radio, entitled "Sunday with Martin Luther King," explains the plight of the "Negro" in the South as similar to the oppression experienced by the Israelites in the book of Exodus.

Syllabus for the History of Christianity

This document is a course syllabus for the History of Christianity.

Teacher's Manual: Civil Disobedience, Morality, and the Coming of the Civil War

Muriel Moulton of Chicago, Illinois provides a course manual for teaching civil disobedience and morality leading up to the American Civil War. Moulton does not assign a value to the morality of civil disobedience, but only poses the question while providing primary sources for interpretation.

Telegram from Mrs. Dorothy Johnson to MLK

Mrs. Dorothy Johnson writes Dr. King to express her support of his endeavors while he is in jail in Birmingham, Alabama.

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