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Philosophy

Associated Archive Content : 603 results

Celsus

Dr. King writes about Celsus, a second century Greek philosopher who opposed Christianity.

Certainty (Religious)

Dr. King refers to Brightman's "Philosophy of Religion" in regard to religious certainty.

Chapter 1 - Introduction

In this dissertation, Dr. King discusses several investigations and problems. He centers the paper around a comparison of "the conceptions of God in the thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman."

Chapter II - The Methodologies of Tillich and Wieman

This is the third chapter of Dr. King's dissertation "A Comparison of the Conception of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman."

Chapter IV - Weiman's Conception of God

Dr. King professes his ideas and viewpoints as they relate to Henry Nelson Wieman's theology on God. Wieman, an American philosopher of Naturalistic Religion, believed that God was a natural process rather than a supernatural entity.

Christ

Dr. King quotes a passage from Adolf Harnack's "What Is Christianity?" in which Harnack contrasts Plato's focus on the wise with that of Jesus Christ, who finds value in every human.

Christian Social Philosophy

Dr. King focuses on the interrelatedness of Christian social philosophy, Christian ethics and theology. He argues for the rejection of theology that has no social ethics and also contends that ethics must be dynamic.

Christian Social Philosophy II

An outline briefly explains T.S. Eliot's opinion on culture and how it pertains to religion, specifically Christianity. Notes taken on the side of the outline insinuate that Western culture is beginning to disintegrate because the values it was built on are decreasing in importance.

Christianity

Dr. King outlines Angus' interpretation of Hegel's views on Christianity in the book, "The Mystery Religion and Christianity."

Christianity and Civilization

Dr. King records a quote from Arnold J. Toynbee's "Civilization on Trial" and the view that "religious progress comes through the birth and death of civilization."

Christology

Dr. King references the concept of Christology by quoting German theologian Albrecht Ritschl.

Christology and Anthropology

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Daniel Ernst Schleiermacher, a German philosopher, regarding the universal understanding of sins.

Class Notes: Obadiah

Dr. King writes about the book of Obadiah and knowledge.

Cognition

This note card discusses cognition in relation to the context of events.

Communism

Dr. King quotes a statement from Jacques Maritain's "True Harmonism" regarding communism. Jacques Maritain was a famous French Catholic philosopher.

Conception of Man

Dr. King documents a passage from Reinhold Niebuhr's work "The Nature and Destiny of Man." He would later cite this work in his essay "The Theology of Reinhold Niebuhr," written during his career at Boston University.

Conscience

Dr. King ponders the meaning of the word 'conscience.' He questions the nature of conscience and ultimately sees it as a necessary sense of obligation that makes a difference in the life of a civilization.

Contradiction

Dr. King writes a quote expressing the bounds of consciously living in contradiction.

Copernicus

Dr. King discusses how the discoveries of renowned astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus and German philosopher Immanuel Kant revolutionized thinking regarding the human mind. The note card also outlines philosophical views originating from the "analogy of two clocks" referencing prominent thinkers Rene Descartes and Gottfried Leibniz.

Crozer Theological Seminary Comprehensive Examinations

The following is a detailed overview of comprehensive examinations at the Crozer Theological Seminary in Chester, Pennsylvania. Exams are both written and oral. "The purpose of the oral examination is to discover the student's ability to think in an integrative manner over all the areas of the theological education."

David T. Doherty Letter of Request to Dr. King

Mr. Deherty, a PH.D candidate at Stanford University, asks Dr. King if he will answer a few questions regarding the influence of Henry David Thoreau on his philosophy of non-violence.

Death

Dr. King documents a quote from Pascal regarding "Death."

Death

Dr. King meditates on death and a quotation from Thomas Carlyle in which Carlyle compares the death of his mother to the moon sinking into a dark sea.

Death

Dr. King writes on the "empty feeling" of death, citing St. Augustine's autobiographical book, "Confessions." This index card contains a quote from the work in which the philosopher reflects on the death of his closest friend.

Descartes

Dr. King quotes the French philosopher Rene Descartes on the concept of "doubt."

Descartes

Dr. King quotes Rene Descartes' discovery of his famous principle. The idea, "I think, therefore I am," Descartes says, is essential, irrefutable and fitting to be the first principle of his philosophy.

Descartes

Dr. King references a theological concept by the French philosopher Rene Descartes.

Dewey

Dr. King records John Dewey's views on philosophy and religion.

Dialectical Theology

Dr. King outlines dialectical theology, an approach to theology in Protestantism. King discerns that the "dogmatic arise primarily out of the demands of the religious consciousness."

Dictator

Dr. King reveals the definition of a dictator according to Plato.

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