Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Montgomery Bus Boycott

Associated Archive Content : 147 results

Fisk News: The Montgomery Story

This publication of Fisk News features one of Dr. King's speeches on page five. The speech is entitled "The Montgomery Story," and was delivered at the 13th Annual Institute of Race Relations at Fisk University. Dr. King commences to share of Rosa Parks' refusal to move from her bus seat and help begin the historic Montgomery Bus Boycott. Blacks boycotted public transportation for 7 months in Montgomery, Alabama and achieved success in changing the city's discriminatory practices.

Foreword of "The Power of Nonviolence"

This is a copy of a foreword written by Dr. King to Richard Gregg's "The Power of Nonviolence."

Gunnar Jahn's 1964 Nobel Peace Prize Speech on MLK

Gunnar Jahn shares background information about Dr. King prior to presenting him the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. In his speech, Jahn informs the audience about the bus boycotts and the campaign for equality that Dr. King led. He also discusses Dr. and Mrs. King's choice to leave the easier life in the North to fight a racial battle in the South. Lastly he discusses Dr. King's dedication to his church and his faith in God.

Howard University Charter Day Observance

Howard University celebrates its' Charter Day Observance with a program that includes a speech by Dr. King. The program also acknowledges the recipients of the Alumni Achievement Award. Such individuals include Ossie Davis and Leroy F. Florant.

Introduction of MLK

These notes are from an introduction written about Dr. King and presumably delivered before he gave an address. Dr. King, who remains unnamed, is presented as a man whose record precedes him given that his life and work has had so profound an impact upon his time.

Join the Ranks! Support A Worker

An SCLC field worker writes to gain support for the SCLC so that the organization can fulfill its mission to help blacks "achieve full citizenship rights, stimulate nonviolent mass action, and secure the right to vote."

Letter from Anna Hedgeman to MLK

Dr. Hedgeman writes Dr. King to express her support for Dr. King's quality service that he has given America. He then targets Dr. King on a letter he received on the representation of the slogan "Black Power." Dr. Hedgeman feels the slogan relates strongly towards extremists and black supremacy. Lastly, she encloses a small contribution and two letters.

Letter From Birmingham City Jail

This version of Dr. King's "Letter From Birmingham Jail," published by the American Friends Service Committee, also includes the original statement made by the clergyman that prompted Dr. King's response. The eight clergymen described Dr. King's actions as "unwise and untimely." In his response, Dr. King references biblical and historical figures to illustrate why the Civil Rights Movement can no longer wait. He also expresses his frustration with many within organized religion and the moderate white American.

Letter from Doris Everett to MLK

Ms. Everett expresses appreciation to Dr. King for leading a successful boycott in Montgomery, Alabama and for his contributions to help Negros obtain equality.

Letter from Elbert Ransom Jr. to MLK

In this letter from Mr. Ransom to Dr. King the former welcomes Dr. King to "our complexed [sic] city." The author also expresses nostalgia for previous shared experiences and his hopes for the future of the movement.

Letter from Eugene Exman to MLK

Mr. Eugene Exman's, expresses disappointment in Dr. King for not having received his manuscript for a forthcoming book of sermons, and urges him to expedite the manuscript.

Letter from Leland Stewart to MLK

Leland Stewart, of the Conference on Science and Religion, writes to Dr. King to offer support in the movement to end the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Marion Hoyt to MLK

Marian Hoyt, manager of the Winsor School's Senior Play, writes Dr. King, providing him a donation on the behalf of the school in Boston. The writer cites specifically appreciation for Dr. King's "work in Montgomery."

Letter from Mary L. Powell to MLK

Mary L. Powell writes to Dr. King expressing how she has been following and considering his plans, but disproves of his methods.

Letter from Mel Koch to MLK

Mel Koch responds to Dr. King's request about purchasing Volkswagen Microbuses for the Montgomery Improvement Association. Koch includes reasons as to why he opposes the idea and cannot recommend the vehicles for King's purposes.

Letter from MLK to Sara B. Jackson

Dr. King extends gratitude to Mrs. Jackson for her moral and financial support.

Letter from Mrs. Clara Bayles to MLK

Mrs. Bayles of Des Moines, Iowa writes Dr. King during his sentence in the Birmingham jail. She congratulates him for all of his achievements and reminisces on the events she has been privileged to attend and hear him speak publicly.

Letter from Robert Bondy to MLK

Though a long time supporter of Dr. King, Robert Bondy, criticizes for Dr. King for mixing the issues of civil rights and Vietnam. He argues that speaking out against Vietnam has only further inflamed opponents of the Civil Rights Movement, and Dr. King has thrown back the movment "for a long time to come."

Letter from Samuel W. Williams to MLK

In this letter, Rev. Samuel W. Williams, Pastor of Friendship Baptist Church, offers encouraging words to Dr. King.

Letter from Thomas G. Carson to MLK

Thomas G. Carson writes Dr. King as a white supporter of civil rights legislation, but fed-up with what he feels are the changing views of Dr. King and the riots "committed by Negroes in the name of civil rights."

Letter from Thomas Gilliam to MLK

Thomas Gilliam writes this letter with hope that Dr. King will grant him an interview about the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

Letter from Viva Sloan to MLK

Viva O'Dean Sloan commends Dr. King on his efforts, but calls on his support to promote denominational integration of religions.

Letter from Wilbur C. Davis to MLK

Wilbur C. Davis writes Dr. King seeking prayer for him and his family. Davis also includes a poem that he wrote regarding Dr. King's life and involvement in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from William W. Boyer to MLK

This Letter from William W. Boyer, Chairman of the Convocations Committee, to Dr. King informs Dr. King the transcription of his "Future of Integration" speech to the Kansas State University academic community has arrived. A copy of the transcription will be published in Issues 1968.
This enclosed transcription of his speech addresses many varied issues affecting American society.

Letter to the Public of Montgomery, Alabama

The ministerial leaders of Montgomery address the problems of discrimination and segregation within the city's bus system. The ministers form a plan of action to eliminate such practices and attain a equal society for all.

Liberation: Our Struggle

Dr. King contributes an article to the "Liberation" publication explaining the reasons for the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott. He conveys the issues involving segregation on buses, the demise of Negro inferiority and the miscalculations of white Montgomery civic leaders. According to Dr. King, "Every attempt to end the protest by intimidation, by encouraging Negroes to inform, by force and violence, further cemented the Negro community and brought sympathy for our cause from men of good will all over the world."

Manuscript by MLK dated 2/3/62 entitled "People in Action"

In this 1962 draft for his column in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King emphasizes that school desegregation and the Rosa Parks incident are crucial turning points in the Civil Rights Movement.

Martin Luther King....At Communist Training School

This advertisement printed in the Augusta Courier accuses Dr. King and several constituents of communist involvement.

MLK Address - The Association of The Bar of the City of New York

Dr. King gives an address to the Association of The Bar of the City of New York at the Hilton Hotel in New York. He praises lawyers for using their knowledge to aid the Civil Rights Movement. He states that Negro lawyers bring wisdom and a determination to win to the courtroom. Dr. King also defines an unjust law as a law that is "out of harmony with moral law of the universe."

MLK Address at the 53rd National Convention of the NAACP

This document is Dr. King's address to the 53rd Annual Convention of the NAACP in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King discusses the following myths in this address: time will solve all problems, education can only solve problems of racial conflict, the Negro vote can do little to alter present conditions, and the practice of nonviolence is ineffective. Dr. King also speaks on "disunity," and states "the law may not make a man love me, but it may keep him from lynching me."

Pages