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Martin Luther King, Jr. - Critics

Associated Archive Content : 190 results

Letter from O. O. Rabb to MLK

This note and newspaper clipping from O.O. Robb was addressed to "The Right Reverend Martin Luther King, Pastor & Civil Rights Agitator." Robb assures Dr. King that he would, in fact, find supporters, "for there are many soft-headed wild-eyed people who have a soft heart and no brains who will follow." Robb contines that President Johnson's Great Society and War on Poverty must go on and ends that Dr. King and his supporters will get their reward - a prison cell.

Letter from Ora Belle Tamm to MLK

Ora Belle Tamm objects to the reaction of Negro leaders during the Adam Clayton Powell affair and expresses her disappointment to Dr. King.

Letter from P. A. Riley to MLK

A critic writes Dr. King a carefully constructed letter to share her view on his Vietnam War stance. As a widow of a late Korean War veteran, she claims that Dr. King's position undermines "everything that our fighting men, down thru the long, long, years, have fought and died for." The widow questions Dr. King's combination of civil rights and peace movement issues, and asserts "patriotism is one of the factors free men live and prosper under!"

Letter from Patricia Reid to MLK

Patricia Reid has mixed feelings about Dr. King and the position he has taken. Even though she and her husband agree with this stance on civil rights, they respectfully disagree on his position on the Vietnam War. The Reids believe that Dr. King shouldn't interfere with foreign policy unless he can come up with a viable solution to end the Vietnam War. However, they still feel compelled to contribute to the work of the SCLC, but warn Dr. King that other individuals may not be that sympathetic.

Letter from Paul Noe to MLK

Mr. Noe shares his ideas and comments with Dr. King regarding the Civil Rights Movement. Mr. Noe describes the Civil Rights Movement as the "exclusive domain of the black man" and discusses how he has felt very left out of the movement due to his race. He hopes that the Civil Rights Movement will become the "domain of all Americans" and will change its appeal from racism to decency.

Letter from Peter S. Shults to NAACP

Peter Shults writes the NAACP requesting a comment on a postcard he received that depicts Dr. King as a communist. He asks multiple questions regarding the validity of the picture on the postcard.

Letter from R. Terry Taft to MLK

R. Terry Taft expresses his disappointment in reading Dr. King's feelings in Newsweek regarding the failure of the Office of Urban affairs to become a federal cabinet position.

Letter from Ralph H. Eaton to MLK

Ralph Eaton explains to Dr. King why he will no longer send contributions to the SCLC.

Letter from Richard Beal to MLK

Mr. Beal informs Dr. King that he believes the best way for African Americans to gain the support of Caucasian Americans is for them to earn their respect.

Letter from Robert Bondy to MLK

Though a long time supporter of Dr. King, Robert Bondy, criticizes for Dr. King for mixing the issues of civil rights and Vietnam. He argues that speaking out against Vietnam has only further inflamed opponents of the Civil Rights Movement, and Dr. King has thrown back the movment "for a long time to come."

Letter from Robert Needles to MLK

A critic writes to Dr. King to explain why he will not support his program. He insists that Dr. King's activity only contributes to the "deterioration of the colored people in America."

Letter from Robert S. Browne to MLK

Robert S. Browne informs Dr. King that he disagrees with the editor the New York Times. Browne conveys his support to Dr. King for his nonviolent philosophy.

Letter from Robert Sandberg from MLK

Robert Sandberg criticizes Dr. King for his recent statements on the Vietnam War. Mr. Sandberg states that Dr. King's position has now undermined his effectiveness as a leader in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Ruth E. Foster to MLK

Mrs. Foster writes Dr. King expressing doubt in his nonviolent methods. She feels his nonviolent marches are an ineffective way to gain equality for Negroes.

Letter from Sam Jones to MLK

In this letter, dated January 11, 1968, Sam Jones expresses his disappointment in Dr. King for not acknowledging his letters. Jones wrote several letters to King asking for assistance in the struggle to restrain the Florida State Legislature's "Lily White" body from writing a new State Constitution.

Letter from Samuel Starr to MLK

Mr. Starr shares his thoughts regarding the "negro people," suggesting they go back to Africa and organize civilization under Dr. King's leadership.

Letter from Spencer Beach to MLK

Spencer Beach expresses dissatisfaction with Dr. King and SCLC's stance on challenging "administration policy" about the Vietnam War. Even though he agrees that the Vietnam War is unjust, Beach feels that Dr. King should narrow his concerns to civil rights marches and issues within the United States.

Letter from Stacey McCloud to MLK

Stacey McCloud writes to Dr. King suggesting that he, Stokley Carmichael and others relocate to Africa and march.

Letter from Stanley Singer to MLK

Stanley Singer replies to Dr. King's article in the NY Times Magazine entitled, "The Case Against 'Tokenism'." Mr. Singer implies that the Negro race is inferior due to their immorality. He highlights the perceived negative attributes of the African American community by the inadequacies within their family structure. Mr. Singer expounds on nonviolent resistance, the Civil War, the U.S. constitution, and more.

Letter from Sympathizer to MLK

Writing under a pseudonym, the author suggests that the world is separate because that is the way that God intended it to be. The author pulls text from the Bible to support this idea. The author believes that society was equal with the separation and there is no need for Dr. King to continue his fight.

Letter from the KKK Kids to MLK

An anonymous member of The K.K.K. Kids writes Dr. King expressing that he or she believes Dr. King to be "a very ignorant person."

Letter from Thomas G. Carson to MLK

Thomas G. Carson writes Dr. King as a white supporter of civil rights legislation, but fed-up with what he feels are the changing views of Dr. King and the riots "committed by Negroes in the name of civil rights."

Letter from Thomas M. Ward to MLK

Thomas M. Ward, Assistant to the Minister of Calvin Presbyterian Church, requests that Dr. King provide documentation to defend against allegations of being a Communist or Communist sympathizer.

Letter from US Citizen to MLK

"A citizen who loves the country God let him own," writes to Dr. and Mrs. King criticizing them on their views on Vietnam and their ministerial work in regards to Christianity.

Letter from V. W. Shepard to MLK

V. W. Shepard admonishes Dr. King for joining the anti-Vietnam War Movement. He explains that prior to Dr. King's joining the movement he considered the Reverend to be "one of the greatest living Americans."

Letter from W. C. Akers to MLK

W. C. Akers expresses his concern about Dr. King's support of Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter from W. Harding Kneedler to MLK

Dr. W. Harding Kneedler states that "marches are outdated" and believes that a solution is to have quiet organized action.

Letter from W.J. Hurt to MLK

W.J. Hurts thanks Dr. King for his tireless efforts to call for an end to the Vietnam war. He notes that although he doesn't agree with Dr. King on most things, he definitely can stand with him on his position regarding Vietnam.

Letter from Walter Gibson to MLK

Mr. Gibson writes to Dr. King concerning his political position on the Vietnam War. He believes that the war is a just war because the end is to help the South Vietnamese halt the spread of communism.

Letter from William Kivi to MLK

William Kivi warns Dr. King that Senator Edward Brooke is a danger to the progress made as a result of the civil rights movement. Sen. Brooke alleges that Dr. King caused major harm to the movement once he chose to speak out against the Vietnam War. In Kivi's view of Brooke and his policies, "He reasons like a true Republican-out to feather his own nest at the expense of the entire negro race-worldwide."

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