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Albany Movement

The Albany Movement (November 1961-August 1962) was a regional nonviolent protest movement in southwestern Georgia formed by representatives of several local and national organizations, including the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. It aimed to end all forms of segregation and discrimination in Albany. Dr. King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) came to Albany to aid the movement. However, nonviolent demonstrations were met with mass nonviolent arrests that did not receive a lot of negative publicity. Dr. King was arrested and jailed twice. SCLC withdrew from Albany in August 1962, before the movement had accomplished any major victories toward integration.

Associated Archive Content : 78 results

Seventh Annual Gandhi Memorial Lecture

Howard University presents Dr. King as its primary speaker for their seventh annual Gandhi Memorial Lecture in 1966. Dr. King traces the slow but meaningful progress society has made from slavery to the current civil rights movement. However, he notes that the present challenges in achieving equality involve not only the silence of individuals of good will but also the conditons that keep the Negro inferior.

Speech to National Press Club

Dr. King answers a number of questions from the National Press Club.

Speeches by the Leaders

In this booklet, the NAACP compiled famous speeches from the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Included are speeches from A. Philip Randolph, Roy Wilkins, James Farmer, Rev. Eugene Carson Blake, Rabbi Joachim Prinz, Whitney M. Young, Matthew Ahmann, John Lewis, Walter Reuther, and Dr. King. The booklet concludes with a pledge and a picture of the throng of supporters that attended the event. test

Statement Condemning Judge Elliot's Restraining Order

Dr. King and Dr. William G. Anderson, President of the Albany Movement, denounce US District Judge J. Robert Elliott's temporary restraining order that prevents them from staging protests. They add that, out of respect for the federal judiciary, they will abide by the order and appeal to a higher level. They assume the order applies only to the named defendants and colleagues and not to the entire community and will not discourage others from taking action. Judge Elliott’s injunction was later overturned by the Fifth Circuit US Court of Appeals.

Statement from MLK Regarding Albany Movement

While serving a forty-five day sentence alongside Ralph D. Abernathy, Dr. King releases a statement expressing his appreciation for President Kennedy's support of the Albany Movement.

Statement on Penance for Violence in Albany, Georgia

Dr. King calls for a day of penance that will serve as a tactic of the self-purification step of the nonviolence method. Dr. King urges for the City Commission to talk with leaders of the Albany Movement.

Telegram from Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights to MLK

The Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights and its executives offer support to Dr. King, who is imprisoned in the Albany jail.

Telegram from Emory R. Searcy to MLK and Others

Dr. Searcy advises Dr. King and Dr. Abernathy to consider relinquishing their involvement with the Albany Movement. The sender suggests that this action may help to dispel contention resulting from "the presence of outsiders" and the process of negotiations.

Telegram from John Barber and Rev. L. C. Filer to MLK

John Barber, President of the New Haven Branch of the NAACP, sends his support to Dr. King while he serves time in Albany County Jail. Barber expresses sympathetic concern and promises to register financial support soon.

Telegram from John Dempsey to President John F. Kennedy

John Dempsey, Governor of Connecticut, telegrams President John F. Kennedy urging "the full force of the federal government be used to assure the personal safety of Dr. King and his associates who are asserting their rights as citizens."

Telegram from Wyatt Tee Walker

Walker sends out this telegram to inform its recipients that Dr. King and Rev. Abernathy have been unjustly arrested in Albany, Georgia.

Thank You Letter from MLK Regarding Albany Incarceration

Dr. King thanks his supporters for sending him encouraging letters during his incarceration in Albany, Georgia.

The Civil Rights Struggle in the United States Today

This pamphlet, published by the Association of the Bar of the City of New York, is a transcript of an address delivered by Dr. King titled "The Civil Rights Struggle in the United States Today." In his first speech before the organization, Dr. King recounts the history of the global civil rights movement.

The Massachusetts Review: A Legacy of Creative Protest

Dr. King writes of the influence of Henry David Thoreau's essay on the duty of civil disobedience in forming his belief that non-cooperation with evil is a moral obligation. He cites lunch-counter sit-ins, freedom rides, and the bus boycott as evidence that Thoreau’s thinking is still alive. This article appeared in a special 1962 issue of The Massachusetts Review commemorating the centennial of Thoreau’s death.

The New Leader: MLK's Letter from Birmingham Jail

The New Leader, a New York-based biweekly magazine, published Dr. King?s Letter from Birmingham City Jail. This historic piece is a response to the views of some fellow clergymen that Dr. King's methods are both "unwise and untimely.? King's critics had branded him an "outside agitator" and an extremist who should not be advocating lawbreaking. Dr. King responds with this letter and references prominent historical figures to counter these criticisms.

The Story of Snick

"From Freedom High to Black Power," by Gene Roberts, describes the opposing views voiced by SNCC and Dr. King regarding the civil rights movement. SNCC asserts a message of violence and black power, while Dr. King promotes a philosophy of love and nonviolence.

The Sword That Heals

Dr. King, in this article adapted from his book "Why We Can't Wait," evaluates the intimidation the Negro faces as a result of securing freedom. He uses the campaigns in Birmingham, Albany, and Montgomery as backdrops to depict how the use of nonviolent direct action causes unrelenting sacrifice in the face of grave danger. This article was published in this quarterly summer 1964 issue of "The Critic."

The Witness: MLK Writes from Birmingham Jail

"The Witness" publishes the second part of Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham City Jail." In this pivotal document, Dr. King expresses dissatisfaction with the white moderate and the white church regarding their silent stance on segregation and discrimination. He urges individuals to understand the delays, broken promises, and intimidation Negroes face to secure their freedom.

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