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Afro-Americans - Economic conditions

Associated Archive Content : 168 results

Letter to MLK concerning nonviolent approaches

Mrs. Ettinger offers Dr. King advice on a alternative approach to advance human rights. She also explains how it is up to blacks within the communities to make a better effort towards equality.

Letter to Mr. R.C. Firestone

An unknown author writes to Mr. R. C. Firestone stating how delightful it is to hear that the Firestone Company plans to build a new plant in Albany, Ga.

Look Magazine: Can Johnson Win His Other War?

The Office of Economic Opportunity republished this spotlight on President Johnson's War on Poverty from Look Magazine in June 1967. The editors discuss the "poverty of opportunity" plaguing nearly 1 in every 6 Americans, saying that Johnson's War on Poverty makes an attempt to combat the economic conditions of America's most vulnerable, including Negro Americans. The articles also shed light on the numerous shortcomings the Johnson Administration-supported legislation has encountered amongst legislators and the American public.

Memo from Barbara Moffett to MLK

Barbara W. Moffett writes a memorandum to Dr. King and Harry Wachtel, commenting on a second draft statement submitted by the American Friends Service Committee to the SCLC. Ms. Moffett also sends a copy of the memo with a handwritten note to Andy Young.

Memorandum Regarding The March On Washington For Jobs and Freedom

In this memorandum, Bayard Rustin provides various civil rights leaders with the agenda for their upcoming leadership meeting regarding the 1963 March on Washington For Jobs and Freedom.

MLK Address on Racial Injustice, Poverty, and War

Dr. King addresses the French community during his "Racial Injustice, Poverty, and War" speech. He discusses topics such as poverty, politics, war, and the government.

MLK Addresses Riots and War

Dr. King encourages friends to support nonviolence in order to avoid physical or moral destruction. He explains that the, "SCLC cannot support riots for moral and pragmatic reasons."

MLK Addresses the Atlanta Press Club

Dr. King discusses the struggle for racial justice and the concept of goodwill with the Atlanta Press Club. He stresses that any opposition in the fight for equality will inevitably fail in the face of a unified effort across America.

MLK Speaks on Vietnam War

This 32-page booklet was published by Clergy and Laymen Concerned About Vietnam shortly after Dr. King’s April 4, 1967 Riverside Church address on the Vietnam War. It features a foreword by Dr. Reinhold Niebuhr, Dr. King’s speech, and remarks by Henry Steele Commager, Dr. John C. Bennett, and Rabbi Abraham Heschel. In addition, it includes a New York Times interview with Dr. King, King’s response to NAACP criticism on his opposition to the war, and letters to the editor of the New York Times.

MLK's Address to American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa

Drawing connections between the social injustices of two continents, Dr. King discusses the relationship between segregation in America and colonialism in Africa. Dr. King also shares his opinion about America dominating Africa politically and economically.

MLK's Address to Syracuse University

Dr. King, in a public speech at Howard University, talks about numerous factors that affect education in America.

MLK's Crawfordville, Georgia Speech

Dr. King rallies the people to keep pushing forward with nonviolent actions to gain freedom and dignity as human beings.

MLK: New Year Hopes

In this draft of an article for the New York Amsterdam News for January 5, 1963, Dr. King refers to the near-disaster of the Cuban missile crisis and says it?s time for the nation to work on agreements on nuclear testing and disarmament and its United Nations goals. Domestic issues that demand attention are education, medical care for the aged and new civil rights legislation.

More State Funds Urged for Negro Banks

This article reports about Operation Breadbasket's request for more funding from the State of Illinois to further its economic development efforts in the African American community.

My Dream: The Violence of Poverty

In this draft of an article that appeared in the New York Amsterdam News January 1, 1966, Dr. King points out that although the Negro in America is freer, he is “an impoverished alien in an affluent society.” He cautions that the Administration will fail in its War on Poverty if it substitutes welfare programs for the creation of new jobs. He says the Negro’s nonviolent movement directed at the violence of poverty as well as the violence of segregation.

New Housing Developments - West

This outline entails the location, prices, floor plans and descriptions of new homes for Negro families.

New York Times: The Case Against Tokenism

In this article for the New York Times, Dr. King writes of his experiences in an Albany, GA jail. Furthermore, he submits the idea that a delayed response to integration and equality for all is no longer acceptable due to the Negro having a "new sense of somebodiness."

News Release from Congressman John Conyers Jr.

Congressman John Conyers, Jr. requests that a conference be held including Negro elected officials to support his thirty billion dollar bill to help the nation's ghettos.

Newsmakers Interview with MLK

Los Angeles' Channel 2 interviews Dr. King for its Newsmakers program. Topics include King's call for a negotiated settlement in Vietnam and the resulting criticism by other civil rights leaders, plans for mass demonstrations in Los Angeles on the poverty bill, King's position on the armed group called the Deacons and his commitment to nonviolence, and how he responds to the personal threats on his life.

Oberlin College Commencement

This issue of the Oberlin Alumni Magazine features commencement articles and photos as well as Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution, Dr. King’s address to the graduating class.

Operation Breadbasket

Rev. Jesse Jackson meets with National Tea Company and Del Farm Foods representatives to sign an agreement that will create jobs for blacks.

Operation Breadbasket Advises Tastee Bread Company on Negro Economic Relations

The Cincinnati and Midwestern Division of SCLC's Operation Breadbasket provides Tastee Bread Company with several recommendations concerning employment practices and involvement in the Negro community.

Operation Breadbasket As Vision, Promise and Hope

This report discusses the socio-economic position of Negroes as it relates to education achievement, employment opportunities, and access to power and societal institutions.

Operation Breadbasket Food Store Agreement

Economic conditions begin to change as High-Low Foods and the ministers of Operation Breadbasket team up to provide better opportunities for African Americans.

Operation Breadbasket Program Hosts MLK

This program acts as proof of direct action as Dr. King, Reverend Newberry, Reverend Jesse Jackson, and Reverend Johnson present Operation Breadbasket to New Friendship Church.

Operation Breadbasket Seminar

This brochure explains the economic development program "Operation Breadbasket." It consists of Negro and white clergymen of all faiths who are working to build a solid economic base among Negro people.

Operation Breadbasket: A Statement by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Dr. King announces an agreement made with Pick-n-Pay Supermarkets that will open numerous jobs for the Negro community. The

Pathos and Hope

Dr. King speaks about a trip to the Mississippi Delta where he first witnessed hope and pathos simultaneously.

People in Action: "The Negro Looks at America"

Dr. King discusses the synonymous relationship between segregation and colonialism which was addressed at the Arden House Campus of Columbia University. This discussion was formally named the American Negro Leadership Conference for it covered in array of issues and involved various organizations.

People In Action: A Profound Moral..Continued

Dr. King challenges the Negro church and its leadership to uphold the morals of the community. He insists that clergymen must speak out guardedly to obtain support.

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