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Shuttlesworth, Fred L.

b. 1922 - d. 2011

Born in Mount Meigs, Alabama, Fred Shuttlesworth became pastor of Bethel Baptist Church in Birmingham in 1953. When Alabama banned the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) in 1956, Shuttlesworth organized the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights (ACMHR). Later that year, his home was bombed. Shuttlesworth helped found the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) in 1957. He and his wife Ruby were beaten trying to enroll their children in school. In 1963, the SCLC joined Shuttlesworth in leading Project C (confrontation) to challenge segregation in Birmingham. Public Safety Commissioner Bull Connor responded to demonstrators with fire hoses, dogs and billy clubs. Hundreds, including children, were arrested. The images of police brutality shocked the nation, led to the integration of public spaces in Birmingham and prompted President Kennedy to submit legislation that became the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Shuttlesworth became pastor of Greater New Light Baptist Church in Cincinnati in 1966.

Associated Archive Content : 79 results

Southern Conference Educational Fund Endorsement of MLK Vietnam Stance

The Southern Conference Educational Fund issues this article in the Patriot News Service. This statement supports Dr. King's sentiments regarding the Vietnam War and also details issues of race, injustice, and inequality in various places throughout the world.

Southern Leaders Conference letter to Eisenhower

Ministers meeting at the Southern Negro Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration co-signed this letter to Pres. Eisenhower.

Statement Regarding Fred L. Shuttlesworth's Court Appearances

This document explains Rev. Shuttlesworth upcoming court appearances as a result of his civil rights activities. He faces charges for blocking a sidewalk during a demonstration and for protesting at Drake Memorial Hospital.

Telegram from Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights to MLK

The Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights and its executives offer support to Dr. King, who is imprisoned in the Albany jail.

Telegram from Civil Rights Leaders to President Kennedy

Members of the SCLC and prominent civil rights leaders request an immediate conference with President John F. Kennedy regarding the 1963 Birmingham church bombing.

Telegram from MLK to Attorney General Kennedy

Dr. King writes to Attorney General Robert Kennedy regarding the safety of Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth during his 90 day jail sentence.

Telegram from MLK to Fred Shuttlesworth

Dr. King provides support and encouragement to Rev. Shuttlesworth.

Telegram from MLK to Mrs. Lovie M. Lowe

Dr. King attempts to mediate between Mrs. Lowe and her pastor, the Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth.

Telegram from MLK to Robert Kennedy

Dr. King informs Attorney General Robert Kennedy of Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth's arrest and expresses his concern for Shuttleworth's safety due to recent threatening activities directed toward nonviolent leaders.

Telegram from Reverend Fred L Shuttlesworth to MLK

Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy assures Dr. King that the nation extends their congratulations and prayer for his success. Reverend Abernathy asserts that as soldiers of freedom, they must "win this battle" for their country and that there "can be no retreat" in the movement.

Telegram from the Montgomery Improvement Association to Leaders of Birmingham

The Montgomery Improvement Association office staff sends Dr. King, Rev. Shuttlesworth, Rev. Abernathy and other Birmingham civil rights leaders words of encouragement.

Telegram to MLK from Treasurer W. E. Shortridge

Members of the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights send Dr. King encouraging words during his sentence at Albany City Jail.

Telegram to MLK from W.E. Gardner

Rev. Gardner organizes a board meeting to plan for a Southern Christian Leadership Conference Convention.

The Civil Rights Struggle in the United States Today

This pamphlet, published by the Association of the Bar of the City of New York, is a transcript of an address delivered by Dr. King titled "The Civil Rights Struggle in the United States Today." In his first speech before the organization, Dr. King recounts the history of the global civil rights movement.

The Deep South in Social Revolution

The Deep South in Social Revolution was the theme for the 1961 SCLC Annual Meeting.

The New Leader: MLK's Letter from Birmingham Jail

The New Leader, a New York-based biweekly magazine, published Dr. King?s Letter from Birmingham City Jail. This historic piece is a response to the views of some fellow clergymen that Dr. King's methods are both "unwise and untimely.? King's critics had branded him an "outside agitator" and an extremist who should not be advocating lawbreaking. Dr. King responds with this letter and references prominent historical figures to counter these criticisms.

This is SCLC

This is a brochure describing the functions of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Subjects discussed in this brochure include the source of SCLC'S funds, community efforts, civil rights demonstrations, and information on its leadership training and citizenship schools.

Two Noted Rights Workers Added to Staff of SCEF

This article explains Ella J. Baker and John R. Salter were added to the New Orleans based Southern Christian Educational Fund shortly before its headquarters were raided by more than 100 policemen on October 4th.

We Return to Birmingham Jail to Bear Witness

On his way to turn themselves in to Birmingham jail again in 1967, Dr. King writes this article in longhand, asserting the purposes of the civil rights activists' civil disobedience. Their unjust incarceration, he states, will allow them to bear witness to an unjust justice system, from Bull Connor's dogs to the US Supreme Court. The Court had just issued a decision supporting Connor's injunction forbidding the protests of the Birmingham campaign, which had led to his first incarceration there in 1963.

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