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McDonald, Dora E.

b. 1925 - d. 2007

Dora Edith McDonald attended South Carolina State College. After graduation she worked as secretary for Benjamin Mays, president of Morehouse College. In 1960 Dr. King hired her as his personal secretary, a position she held until his death. Working from Ebenezer Baptist Church and then the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) office, McDonald typed King’s manuscripts and sermons, took telephone calls, organized his speaking engagements and often traveled with him. She was his confidante, sounding board and close family friend. McDonald traveled with the Kings to Oslo for the Nobel Peace Prize ceremony and informed Mrs. King of her husband’s assassination. From 1972 to 1977 she worked for Andrew Young in his congressional office, taking a job with IBM when Young was appointed United Nations ambassador. Her memoir Sharing the Dream: Martin Luther King, Jr., the Movement, and Me was published in 2007.

Associated Archive Content : 454 results

Letter from Dora McDonald to Julia Smith

Dora McDonald responds to Julia Smith's letter on behalf of Dr. King and informs Smith that they hope she accomplishes her dream of becoming a nurse. Miss McDonald also tells Smith that they will remember her in their prayers.

Letter from Dora McDonald to K. Natwar Singh

Enclosed is an article that was originally sent to Mr. K. Natwar Singh from Dr. King. The article discusses Jawaharial Nehru and his fight for peace. In the article, Dr. King expresses the importance of Nehru's beliefs to the United States.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Katherine McBride

Dora McDonald responds to the President of Bryn Mawr College expressing that Dr. King has committed to being the key note speaker for the upcoming graduation. Following the letter is the official commencement invitation.

Letter from Dora McDonald to L. H. Horace Perera

Dora McDonald responds to a letter of recent date from Mr. L. H. Perera regarding an invitation for Dr. King to speak at an event. McDonald states the Dr. King is out of town and will respond once he arrives.

Letter from Dora McDonald to L. N. W. Christian

Dora McDonald writes Mr. Christian on Dr. King's behalf. She acknowledges his disagreement with Dr. King's philosophy and refers him to Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail" for answers to his questions.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Laurence Kirkpatrick

Dora McDonald sends a biographical sketch and photograph as requested to Laurence Kirkpatrick.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Laurence V. Kirkpatrick

Andrew Young instructs Dora McDonald to respond to Laurence V. Kirkpatrick's invitation to Dr. King. Ms. McDonald affirms Dr. King's arrival date and informs Mr. Kirkpatrick that they must accommodate the cost expense for two. She asserts that it is necessary for Dr. King to travel with at least one of his aides.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Linda F. Neslage

Dora McDonald informs Linda F. Neslage that she has the permission to print Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech in the textbook, "Principles and Types of Speech."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mamie Reese

Dr. King's assistant writes Mamie Reese to applaud Eartha Kitt's courage in speaking up about what she believes is the cause of “restlessness” and crime in the streets. Kitt spoke out against the Vietnam War at a White House luncheon hosted by Lady Bird Johnson, the First Lady.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Marie Freckelton

Dora McDonald sends acknowledgement of the receipt of a letter and photograph on behalf of Dr. King to Marie Freckelton.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Marilyn Coulter

Dora McDonald encloses an informational packet from Dr. King to Marilyn Coulter. Dr. King's only request for Coulter is that when she uses the information she cites the source from which it derives.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Marshall E. Bean

Dora McDonald communicates to Marshall E. Bean that Dr. King is remembering him in his prayers and sends a photograph as a visual reminder. Miss McDonald also includes a scripture from the Book of Psalms.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Martin Peretz

In this letter, Ms. McDonald informs Dr. Peretz that Dr. King will be able to have lunch with him and that he will be accompanied by Reverend Andrew Young, Reverend Bernard Lee and herself.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mary V. Leath

Dora McDonald informs Mary Leath of Dr. King's current incarceration in Selma, Alabama. McDonald also tells Leath that her request will be brought to Dr. King's attention upon his return.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Michael J.. Gerstley

Miss McDonald sends Michael Gerstley an autographed card per Dr. King's instructions.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mildred R. Morris

Dora McDonald responds to Mildred R. Morris on behalf of Dr. King, who will take into consideration her offer after meeting with the Executive Staff of SCLC.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Miss Rankin at the US Justice Department

Dora McDonald sends Miss Rankin of the Justice Department a copy of a statement made by Dr. King before the Republican Party. The statement was in reference to his proposed "Bill of Rights for the Disadvantaged."

Letter from Dora McDonald to MLK

Dora McDonald updates Dr. King regarding the numerous letters, invitations, phone calls and other pending business matters while he has been away from the office. During this period of absence, Dr. King had been imprisoned and was now recovering at home.

Letter from Dora McDonald to MLK

Miss McDonald writes Dr. King regarding his recent mail and messages. Included are numerous invitations and missed telephone calls.

Letter from Dora McDonald to MLK about CORE National Convention

This response letter dated June 11, 1964, was sent from Ms. McDonald, secretary of Dr. King to Mr. James Farmer. She states that while Dr. King will not be able to attend the CORE National Convention, he will send a representative from the SCLC to the meeting.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Moisa Bulboaca

Dora McDonald responds to a request from Louisiana native Moisa Bulboaca invites Dr. King to visit Romania. Ms. McDonald states Dr. King is involved in the freedom struggle and at the present time will be unable to accept the invitation.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Monica Wilson

Dora McDonald, on behalf of Dr. King, responds to Monica Wilson at the University of Cape Town in acceptance of her invitation to speak at the institution. McDonald closes requesting confirmation of a date for Dr. King, as well as accommodation information.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. and Mrs. Robert Wise

Dora McDonald writes to Mr. and Mrs. Robert Wise to inform them of a transfer of funds to the intended recipient.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. Arrignton

Miss McDonald writes on behalf of Dr. King concerning a photograph request. She informs Mr. Arrington that Dr. King will be unable to honor his request due to his apprehension surrounding for profit merchandise.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. Eric N. Gerdeman

Dora McDonald informs Eric N. Gerdeman that Dr. King is unable to provide an article due to his involvement in Birmingham, Alabama, Danville, Virginia, and writing assignments already accepted.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. H. L. Wynter

Dora McDonald communicates to Mr. H. L. Wynter that Dr. King will be able to attend his baccalaureate service for the University of the West Indies.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. Maurice B. Fagan

In this letter, Ms. Dora McDonald confirms receipt of recent letter from Mr.Maurice Fagan. She conveys to Mr. Fagan of Dr. King's desire to nominate The Honorable Richard Hatcher Mayor of Gary, Indiana, for the 1967 National Fellowship Award.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. R. Elliot

This letter is in response to an inquiry made by Mr. R. Elliot, on February 8th, 1968, in regards to housing development plans for the Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. S.C. Njonjo

Dora McDonald responds to Mr. Njonjo's invitation for Dr. King to attend Kenya's Independence Celebration. Ms. McDonald informs Mr. Njonjo that Dr. King is happy to accept the invitation.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. Thomas J. Gilliam, November 8, 1967

In this correspondence to Mr. Thomas J. Gilliam, Miss. Dora McDonald - Dr. King's secretary, informed him that his letter came during his Dr. King's absence, but she had an opportunity to communicate with him. She expressed that Dr. King's calendar would not allow him to meet with Mr. Gilliam, for an interview, but suggested that he send in one or two questions for Dr. King to answer and send back.

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