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King, Coretta Scott

b. 1927 - d. 2006

Daughter of Obadiah and Bernice Scott, Coretta Scott King was the wife of Dr. King and founded the Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change in Atlanta. An accomplished musician, she graduated from New England Conservatory of Music after studying at Antioch College. Meeting and courting in Boston, Coretta and Martin married on June 8, 1953 and relocated to Montgomery, Alabama when Martin became pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church. They returned to Atlanta and Dr. King’s home church, Ebenezer Baptist, for the wider work of the movement. A deeply committed civil rights and peace activist herself, Mrs. King primarily reared their four children. Her decades-long effort finally materialized in legislation setting her late husband’s birthday as a federal holiday in 1986. She died in 2006 on January 30.

Associated Archive Content : 367 results

Letter from H. D. Bollinger to Dora McDonald

H.D. Bollinger is honored to have Dr. King as a speaker for their Eighth Quadrennial Methodist Student Movement Conference at the Municipal Auditorium. Mr. Bollinger communicates with Dora McDonald the details of Dr. King's trip. He also informs her that they will cover the travel expenses for Dr. King's assistant and have received the items he requested. In an additional letter a month later, the director of the conference notifies Miss McDonald that they are in need of five additional photographs and the address of Dr. King.

Letter from H. L. Wynter to Dora McDonald

H. L. Wynter writes to Ms. McDonald stating new developments regarding Dr. King's visit to Jamaica in hopes that Dr. King and Mrs. King can adjust.

Letter from Harry Belafonte to MLK

Harry Belafonte outlines the details of the African Program to Dr. King. The document references King's future delegation to several African countries and emphasizes the "Afro-American Banking Proposal" as a topic of interest.

Letter from Harry G. Boyte to Coretta Scott King

In this letter, Harry G. Boyte offers his personal admiration to Mrs. King for the "strength [she has] provided Dr. King."

Letter from Hazel Gregory to MLK

Hazel Gregory, on behalf of the Montgomery Improvement Association, asks Dr. King about transportation to the March on Washington. She also commends him on his recent article published in "Ebony." Dr. King was president of the Montgomery Improvement Association from 1955 to 1960. The organization was founded after the arrest of Rosa Parks, which sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

Letter from Hazel Jardine to MLK and CSK

Mrs. Hazel Jardine commends Dr. King on his efforts to obtain equality for all men.

Letter from Helen G. Frumin to Coretta Scott King

Mrs. Frumin writes Mrs. King to request sponsorship for the Committee of Responsibility. She includes a list of others who have agreed to sponsor the organization among which is Dr. Benjamin Spock, affluent pediatrician and anti-war activist, and other prestigious figures.

Letter from Homer Littlefield McCall to MLK

In this letter, Mr. McCall requests that Dr. King send the certificate of his ordination from Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Letter from Irene Harper to Dora McDonald

Irene Harper inquires of Dr. King's secretary if it would be possible to meet with the King family.

Letter from Israel Goldstein to MLK

Israel Goldstein congratulates Dr. King on winning the Nobel Peace Prize and extends an invitation to the King family to visit his home in Jerusalem.

Letter from Jack Egle to MLK

Jack Engle, European Director of the Council on Student Travel, thanks Dr. King for intervening during the "Nuit des Droits Civiques" in Paris. He also informs Dr. King that the ad hoc committee formed for the event will be disbanded at an upcoming meeting.

Letter from Jack Thayer to Mrs. King

Jack Thayer, of KLAC Radio, writes to Mrs. King thanking her for a recent guest appearance on "Two-Way Radio," in Southern California.

Letter from James Dombrowski to Mrs. King

In this letter, James Dombrowski of the Southern Conference Educational Fund requests financial contributions from Mrs. Coretta S. King for a proposed publication to be entitled "The Color Line in Voting." The initial prototype publication would include the stories of Gus Courts and George W. Lee, who were assassinated, after refusing to remove their names from a voter registration list in Humphreys County, Mississippi.

Letter from James E. Bristol to Coretta Scott King

Mr. Bristol responds to a previous invitation to attend the SCLC's Tenth Annual Convention. He informs Mrs. King of his inability to attend due to a prior engagement but trusts that the convention will make a significant impact.

Letter from James Gilliam to MLK

Mr. Gilliam sends Dr. King financial support in the amount of fifty dollars.

Letter from James McKee to Dora McDonald Concerning MLK's Antioch Commencement Address

James McKee, Chief of the Yellow Springs Police Department, writes Dora McDonald regarding security arrangements for Dr. King's visit to Yellow Springs, Ohio for Antioch College's Commencement.

Letter from James P. Dixon of Antioch College to MLK

James P. Dixon, President of Antioch College, thanks Dr. King for accepting an invitation to speak at the school's commencement ceremony.

Letter from James R. McDowell to Mrs. King

Rev. James McDowell, Headmaster of The Lovett School in Atlanta, informs Mrs. King that the application for Martin Luther King III has been rejected. Mrs. King's application represented the first formal Negro application in the history of The Lovett School, thus the Headmaster had consulted the Board of Trustees. Upon receiving the rejection from the Trustees, McDowell returns Mrs. King's check and apologizes for any inconvenience. Attached to this set of documents is Coretta's statement regarding why she wanted her son to attend The Lovett School.

Letter from Janet Somerville to MLK

Janet Somerville writes to Dr. King, expressing how he has been a renewal of hope for her. She also thanks Dr. King, his family and the SCLC for their hospitality during her visit to Atlanta.

Letter from Jerry Russell to Mrs. King

Jerry Russell offers his sympathy to Coretta Scott King following the death of Dr. King. He describes Dr. King as an individual of greatest integrity.

Letter from Jessie Treichler of Antioch College to Coretta Scott King

On behalf of Antioch College, Jessie Treichler invites Dr. King to speak and Mrs. King to perform at the college. She informs Mrs. King of the honorarium and requests a tentative response.

Letter from Joan Daves to Coretta Scott King

Joan Daves expresses her gratitude toward Mrs. King for her support of her husband throughout his work in the Civil Rights Movement, following his receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Joan Daves writes to Dr. King to thank him for making a visit, in reference to his book. Ms. Daves mentions the positive reactions from the audience and how she believes that their positive feedback will make for a good start of the book.

Letter from John O. Killens to MLK About a Book Party

In this letter, Killens discusses the possibility of a book party in Dr. King's honor. Killens, Ruby Dee, Lofton Mitchell, Ossie Davis, and Harry Belafonte are exploring this idea and believe that at this event many books would be sold and the message of civil rights could be communicated to thousands.

Letter From John Payak to Mrs. King & Family

John Payak offers condolences from a religious perspective to Mrs. King and family.

Letter from John R. Yungblut to CSK

Mr. Yungblut of Quaker House, writes Mrs. King to inquire whether the King Children may be interested in participating in a youth dramatics program.

Letter from John to MLK

John discusses some points on religious ethics with Dr. King and offers gratitude for a Labor Day dinner with the King family.

Letter from Joseph A. Scahill to Mrs. King

Following Dr. King's assassination, Minister Joseph Scahill sent this letter of sympathy to Mrs. King. Minister Scahill mentioned, briefly, his participation in the 1965 Selma campaign with Dr. King and vowed to continue such work.

Letter from Joseph S. Clark to MLK

Mr. Clark, a representative of the United States Senate, requests a written statement from Dr. King concerning a recent Bill (2993) up for election.

Letter from Juanita Turner to MLK

35 year-old Juanita Turner writes Dr. and Mrs. King seeking help in her time of crisis. She has lived in Chicago for 12 years and suffers from epilepsy. She needs help finding a trustworthy attorney, a dependable doctor, and basic necessities.

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