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Jesus Christ

Associated Archive Content : 228 results

Letter from Irene M. Koch to MLK

Irene M. Koch uses a Native American legend of a man walking in the moccasins of his enemy to gain understanding of his enemy. She relates this legend to the current civil rights movement and specifically the civil rights movement in Chicago, Illinois.

Letter from J. L. Roberts to MLK

Minister Roberts writes to Dr. King expressing his support of the Civil Rights Movement along with making a donation to the SCLC.

Letter from James E. Davis to MLK

Rev. James A. Davis requests the assistance of Dr. King in his graduate studies focusing on pastoral care and race relations. Davis was recently appointed as the assistant pastor of the Carroll Street Methodist Church in Nashville and expresses distaste with the fact that there are no Negroes members in the congregation. Davis wishes for the Carroll Street Methodist Church to become more inclusive.

Letter from James Gustafson to MLK

James Gustafson, President of 'O KAIROS, writes to Dr. King welcoming him to the University of Minnesota's St. Paul campus. 'O KAIROS is the campus Lutheran community of worship.

Letter from Johann R. Goelz to MLK

Johann R. Goelz highlights the spiritual irony that Dr. King's has the same name of the historical Martin Luther. Mr. Goelz served as a former Lutheran pastor in Germany and expounds on the religious realities of Jesus Christ.

Letter from John to MLK

John discusses some points on religious ethics with Dr. King and offers gratitude for a Labor Day dinner with the King family.

Letter from Joseph P. Robinson to MLK

Reverend Joseph P. Robinson invites Dr. King to contribute to Robinson's book of sermons titled, "Pulpit Evangelism."

Letter from K. Emmons to MLK

K. Emmons proposes to Dr. King that Christians should put God and Jesus above "fumbling politicians." K. Emmons also comments on soldiers in Vietnam.

Letter from Macedonia Church to MLK

Members of Macedonia Church seek advice and help from Dr. King in regards to continuing Sunday worship service.

Letter from Marie Williams and Rev. Harvey Spivey to MLK

Marie Williams and Rev. Harvey write to Dr. King expressing gratitude for the work of SCLC. They further request a donation for their church's building fund.

Letter from Menno Klassen to MLK

Menno Klassen offers support on behalf of the Peace Committee of the Mennonite Central Committee for Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War. Klassen explains that Dr. King is facing the same opposition that Jesus Christ did because he is continuing Jesus' work.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. J. T. Brent

Dr. King responds to a letter from Mrs. Brent by explaining his views about love and its place in the Civil Rights Movement. He affirms that "it is through love and understanding that we approach the segregationist." He mentions that striking out in any act of violence is not condoned by leaders of the movement.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. William Machesney

Dr. King communicates with Mrs. William Machesney of Compton, California regarding her letter about children who need help. Dr. King recommends that Machesney pursue her initiative and encourages her to solicit the support of the State of California.

Letter from MLK to Newsweek Editor Joseph Cummings

Dr. King writes Joseph B. Cummings, Jr. in response to a headline article suggesting that Dr. King had advocated that Negroes turn to a new ideology in their struggle – Communism or the Muslim Movement. He wonders how his statement on a television program in Cleveland could be so misinterpreted.

Letter from MLK to Pastor Summerville

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Pastor Summerville's efforts as translator for a speech he gave before a French audience in Paris.

Letter from MLK to Rev. E. Wayne Roberts

Dr. King writes Rev. E. Wayne Roberts in support of his fellow friend and SCLC Co-Founder Rev. C. K. Steele, Jr. He notes Rev. Steele as "a thorough and competent pastor" that exemplifies the teachings of Jesus Christ.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Phale D. Hale

Dr. King congratulates Rev. Hale on Union Grove Baptist Church's 75th Anniversary.

Letter from Mrs. Donald H. Hage to MLK

Mrs. Hage praises Dr. King's work, particularly his use of peaceful means to accomplish his goals. She also requests information about how best to help at the local level in Colorado.

Letter from Mrs. Emil Singdahlsen to MLK

Mildred Singdahlsen writes to Dr. King concerning the attitude of negro leaders regarding New York Congressman, Adam Clayton Powell. She calls Powell, "not only dishonest, but an opportunist who selfishly advances his own ends," and expresses her hope that Dr. King would speak out about the situation.

Letter from Mrs. J. T. Brent to MLK

Mrs. Brent states her support for Dr. King's cause, and asks him to encourage his people not to hate whites. She writes that "hate will destroy you."

Letter from Mrs. Ted Gustafson to MLK

Mrs. Ted Gustafson writes Dr. King to express her dismay with pastors and the pulpit, providing her belief that a Saint is long overdue.

Letter from Omer Allison to MLK

Mr. Allison expresses dissatisfaction with Dr. King's representation of the Negro race, the church and the Kingdom of God.

Letter from Phyllis Light to the NAACP

Mrs. Light argues that the goals of the NAACP are too low. She compares the efforts of the movement to those of Hitler, Mussolini, Napoleon, and Caesar. Because of these comparisons, Mrs. Light promotes segregation amongst the races and accuses educated African Americans of abandoning their culture.

Letter from Roland Smith to MLK

Roland Smith requests that Dr. King prepare a list of themes for the Baptist Training Union. Smith encloses a copy of themes from the previous year for Dr. King to use as a template.

Letter from Ronald H. Lind to MLK

Reverend Ronald Lind writes to Dr. King, urging him to take a positive stand on the integrity of Representative Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter from Roy T. Poorman to Philadelphia Tribune Editor

Roy T. Poorman writes the editor of the Philadelphia Tribune regarding an article by Morris I. Liebman that opposed "negro civil rights protest demonstrations." Poorman identifies Liebman as a person of Jewish descent and compares the techniques of Dr. King to Biblical leader Moses. Poorman also discusses the lack of action by Jews in America or Germany prior to the genocide of 6,000,000 Jews along with the recent discrimination of the Jewish people in other countries. He writes in support of Dr. King's approach.

Letter from Theodore A. Hamilton to MLK

In this letter, Theodore Hamilton challenges Dr. King to prove that he is not the son of Satan. To prove this Hamilton proposes that he and Dr. King tape open their eyes and look at the sun, claiming that the true Christian will walk away with sight.

Letter from Thomas M. Ward to MLK

Thomas M. Ward, Assistant to the Minister of Calvin Presbyterian Church, requests that Dr. King provide documentation to defend against allegations of being a Communist or Communist sympathizer.

Letter from Warrington Allsop to MLK

During the fall of 1958, Dr. King was stabbed by an African American woman during a book signing in Harlem, an event that nearly cost him his life. Following this event, Warrington Allsop sends his support and well-wishes for Dr. King's immediate recovery.

Letter to MLK from the Daughters of Zion

H.B. Williams, the Shepherdess of the Daughters of Zion, sent this letter to Dr. King saying that they had taken notice to his actions in the fight for civil equality. Williams writes that they do not participate in demonstrations, because that has caused their organization "downfall in ancient times." She further explains that this has "turned into a Holy war, and it is no longer a fight for equality and rights to vote."

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