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Workers Defense League Docket

The Workers Defense League was an organization that defended workers in the interest of social and economic justice. This docket is simply a schedule of the upcoming proceedings in a court of law. The lawsuits deal with immigration, selective service, and the rights of the mentally ill, to name a few.

ABC's Issues and Answers: MLK Interview

Sunday, June 18, 1967

Dr. King sat down with Tom Jerriel, Atlanta Bureau Chief, and John Casserly, Washington Correspondent, of the American Broadcasting Company for their program "Issues and Answers." They discussed the civil rights movement, Dr. King's upcoming book, and the U.S. Supreme Court ruling that Dr. King would serve jail time in Birmingham.

Letter from High School Student Jeanne Adams to MLK

Thursday, May 16, 1963

Joanne Adams, a student from Central High School, writes Dr. King to voice her support for what he is doing for negro citizens in Birmingham, Alabama.

Incarnation

Here, Dr. King notes that the problem of Jesus' Incarnation "boils down to" one single question.

Memorandum from William M. Gray

Friday, April 5, 1968

This memorandum from William M. Gray lists the address to which mourners should send acknowledgements following Dr. King's death.

Science (Its Limitations)

Dr. King notes that while man’s actions as an animal are biological (science), his actions as a person are spiritual and require a spiritual cause, suggesting there is a Creator God.

Letter from Dr. King's Secretary, Maude L. Ballou

In this standard response letter, Dr. King's personal secretary highlighted the progress made in his recovery from a nearly fatal stabbing in Harlem. It also notes that Dr. King would respond to his many "well wishes", once he had been cleared by his physicians.

The Future of Integration

Dr. King discusses "The Future of Integration." King opens with background history of three distinct periods of race relations. The first period extends from 1619 to 1862, the era of slavery. The next period extends from 1863 to 1954 when blacks were emancipated, but still segregated. The third period started on May 17, 1954 when segregation was deemed unconstitutional and integration commenced. Furthermore, Dr. King explains the changes that occurred as a result of integration and how it will affect blacks and whites in the future.

Introduction to an Educational Program on Nonviolence

Monday, September 26, 1966

This document explains the purpose of an educational program on nonviolence. The document then goes into specific details on the curriculum taught in the workshops for nonviolence.

Letter from Joan Daves to Tetsuo Kohmoto

Monday, April 13, 1964

In this letter Joan Daves informs Tetsuo Kohmoto that his letter to Dr. King has come. Joan also says that the terms are being worked out with Katahira of Charles E. Tuttle Co. The letter closes by telling Mr. Kohmoto that he will be hearing more about the matter.

Worship

Dr. King quotes an excerpt from James Bissett Pratt's "Religious Consciousness," which focuses on the purpose of the Protestant sermon. Dr. King expands Pratt's analysis to encompass the entire Protestant service.

Letter from MLK to David Brandyberry

Friday, August 9, 1963

Dr. King thanks Mr. Brandyberry for his recent letter and explains why the current time is "a wonderful and challenging age." He also expresses his hope that the work done in Birmingham, Alabama will bring about better race relations.

Calvin Kytle to Head Information Center for Urban America

This press release revelas that Calvin Kytle will head a new national information center for Urban American, Inc.

Letter from MLK to Senator Daniel Brewster

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King commends Senator Daniel Brewster for his support of the 1964 Civil Rights Act.

Telegram from MLK and Joseph Lowery to William Anderson

Joseph E. Lowery and Dr. King addressed this telegram to William Anderson asking him to attend a SCLC board meeting regarding the Poor People's Campaign.

The Union Baptist Church Sunday Morning Worship Service

Sunday, September 11, 1966

The Union Baptist Church Sunday Morning Worship Service Program outlines the events for September 11, 1966. Dr. King is the guest speaker to commemorate "the retirement of Rev. D. C. Rice from the pastorship of The Union Baptist Church."

Statement by MLK in San Francisco

Tuesday, May 26, 1964

Dr. King gives an address in San Francisco regarding race relations, equality, and segregation. Dr. King charges people from all communities to unite so that hope can be created for others.

The Negro Past and It's Challenge for the Future

In honor of Negro History Week, Dr. King offers this speech on the black community's past and future in America.

Letter from MLK and Rev. Abernathy Regarding the Clergymen's Conference

Dr. King and Rev. Abernathy write to inform their readers of the tentative dates of the Clergymen's Conference on Operation Breadbasket. King and Abernathy mention that the dates of the conference need to be moved due to their impending jail sentence.

Methodology, Tests of Truth

Dr. King discusses Henry Nelson Wieman's test of truth in religion described in "The Source of Human Good."

Telegram from Duncan Wood to MLK

Monday, September 25, 1967

Telegram from Duncan Wood on behalf of the Oslo Committee, hoping to arrange interviews in Moscow with Dr. King and Father Pire.

Paul's Letter to American Christians

Dr. King writes an imaginary letter to modern day Christians from the perspective of the apostle Paul. In the letter, Paul praises his listeners for their technological advancements, yet reprimands them for their spiritual degradation. He encourages them to uphold Christian values despite outside factors.

Enclosure to MLK - A Call for a National Fast by CALCAV

This is an enclosure that accompanied a letter dated March 22, 1968 from John C. Bennett to Dr. King. Dr. King spoke often of the need of fasting to repent for the sin of Vietnam, and was closely associated with the Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam (CALCAV). Between the writing of this letter and the event itself, Dr. King would be assassinated.

Dr. Abernathy Selected for World Peace Mission

Friday, December 29, 1967

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference announces that Ralph D. Abernathy and his wife will embark on a world-wide mission for peace. Abernathy will serve as a delegate to the International Inter-religious Symposium on Peace.

Letter from June Parker to MLK

June Parker writes to Dr. King with much hesitation, stating that what she is going to say has been on her heart for a long time. Parker writes that she believes Negroes, such as herself, must be free in all aspects of life and not just a few areas. She writes she is not a fan of Dr. King's urging to vote Democrat, and alleges that the Democratic Party gave Dr. King $50,000 for his support. She further states Democrats are just getting their friends to be millionaires while slaughtering young men in their prime.

Letter from Ralph M. Holdeman to MLK Pertaining to a Speaking Invitation

Tuesday, February 21, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Holdeman of the National Council of Churches of Christ, requests that Dr. King speak at the Ecumenical Evangelism Conference in Wisconsin.

Letter from MLK to Robert McDougal, Jr.

Tuesday, December 14, 1965

Dr. King thanks Robert McDougal, Jr. for his contribution and support to SCLC and the NAACP Legal Defense Fund.

Mission to Mississippi : Invitation to a Conference

This document lists Dr. King and other clergymen as they invite selected religious leaders to a conference entitled "Mission to Mississippi." The Mission is in support for the Freedom Riders of 1961. It will be a one day event to be held in Jackson, Mississippi on July 20, 1961.

Letter from K. Emmons to MLK

K. Emmons proposes to Dr. King that Christians should put God and Jesus above "fumbling politicians." K. Emmons also comments on soldiers in Vietnam.

Letter from MLK to Joe C. Sullivan Jr.

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

Dr. King thanks Joe Sullivan for his previous correspondence supporting the civil rights movement and the implementation of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Dr. King expresses how he will use nonviolence against those who believe in segregation.