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Letter from the National Committee To Combat Nazism to MLK

Tuesday, June 6, 1967

Rabbi S. Burr Yampol, Chairman of the National Committee to Combat Nazism, sends Dr. King a resolution on civil rights that was passed at their fourth annual conference in Chicago. The resolution formally announces the organization's support of the Civil Rights Movement.

Telegram from Irving Block to MLK

Sunday, January 28, 1968

Rabbi Irving J. Block of the Brotherhood Synagogue in New York requests to meet with Dr. King regarding the Negro Jewish community.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Jack H. O'Dell

Wednesday, July 3, 1963

In response to recent allegations, Dr. King and members of the SCLC Administrative Committee conduct a formal investigation on Mr. O'Dell's reported association with Communist affiliates. Dr. King regrettably informs him that due to this speculation, despite lack of concrete results, he must permanently resign from his position with the SCLC's New York office.

The Suffering Servant

Dr. King writes that Isaiah 53 presents a different view of the servant from chapters 42, 49 and 50. The concept of God's servant evolved from that of Israel as a nation, to the spiritual or inner Israel, to an individual who would take up the work that the others would not. King concludes that the prophecy was fulfilled in Jesus of Nazareth.

What Will You Be When You Grow Up

This pamphlet is one of the early equal employment opportunity publications by the US government. The President's committee on government contracts was established by President Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1953.

Letter from W. F. Washington to MLK

Thursday, April 13, 1967

Rev. Washington assures Dr. King that he has his support as a fellow minister for his stand on the Vietnam War.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Paul J. Dolan

Wednesday, July 12, 1967

On behalf of Dr. King, Dora McDonald grants Paul J. Dolan approval to use the "I Have A Dream" speech that Dr. King delivered at the March on Washington.

Telegram from MLK to President Kennedy

In this draft telegram, Dr. King expresses his appreciation to President Kennedy for the Executive Order outlawing discrimination in all federally assisted housing.

Program - SCLC Presentation of Mahalia Jackson

Sunday, December 1, 1963

This SCLC program is for Miss Mahalia Jackson's concert benefitting the organization.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, June 29, 1965

In this letter Ms. Daves covers several topics relating to dealings with publishers and the protocol in the future. She makes a number of recommendations on the allocation of Dr. King's time and resources and stresses the priority of "a constructive and continuing publishing program related to your work and ideas."

We Return to Birmingham Jail to Bear Witness

On his way to turn themselves in to Birmingham jail again in 1967, Dr. King writes this article in longhand, asserting the purposes of the civil rights activists' civil disobedience. Their unjust incarceration, he states, will allow them to bear witness to an unjust justice system, from Bull Connor's dogs to the US Supreme Court. The Court had just issued a decision supporting Connor's injunction forbidding the protests of the Birmingham campaign, which had led to his first incarceration there in 1963.

Letter from Jean L. Bennett to Dora McDonald

Friday, May 20, 1966

Ms. Jean L. Bennett writes to Ms. McDonald regarding the Platters recording of the song "We Ain't What We Was." She believes that the SCLC should adopt this song as an actual theme song for it was inspired by Dr. King. The Platters were a successful vocal group during this time.

Letter from Gitta Gossman to Dora McDonald

Friday, February 26, 1965

Gitta Gossman forwards Ms. McDonald two copies of the contract for the Dutch-language edition of "Why We Can't Wait" for Dr. King's signature.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Hans Spehr to Ralph David Abernathy

Sunday, April 28, 1968

This letter is addressed to Rev. Ralph Abernathy from the Spehr family of Germany. The couple wanted to inform Rev. Abernathy of their written correspondence to President Lyndon Johnson, drafting a plan that would lead to full employment.

Barth

Dr. King notes Swiss theologian Karl Barth's favorite expression on revelation.

"Dr. King Warns Against the Riots"

Tuesday, June 27, 1967

Eugene Patterson, of the Atlanta Constitution, transcribed his analysis of Dr. King's final publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" Mr. Patterson evaluated Dr. King's views on riots and agreed that riots did not produce any solid improvements to solve the problems in the Negro community.

Letter from Robert Way to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

Robert Way, Chairman of the Hadley Executive Committee, writes to correct a misunderstanding regarding restrictions on the contents of a lecture Dr. King is scheduled to deliver. Mr. Way assures Dr. King he has the freedom to express what he feels is important.

Letter from W.J. Hurt to MLK

Sunday, August 13, 1967

W.J. Hurts thanks Dr. King for his tireless efforts to call for an end to the Vietnam war. He notes that although he doesn't agree with Dr. King on most things, he definitely can stand with him on his position regarding Vietnam.

Letter from SNCC Communication Director Horace Julian Bond to MLK

Sunday, May 31, 1964

Horace Bond, writing on behalf of the Council of Federated Organizations, asks Dr. King to join other civil rights organizations in writing a letter to President Johnson to support the organization's bid for a meeting with the President.

Letter from Hosea Williams to Project Leaders and Field Staff

Tuesday, March 5, 1968

Hosea Williams, Director of National Mobilization for the Washington Poor People's Campaign, informs each project leader of their immediate supervisors of mobilization.

Letter from MLK to Robert J. McCracken

Thursday, February 27, 1964

Dr. King declines to preach twice on one Sunday at Riverside Church in New York City. Besides time constraints, he needs to conserve his strength as per his doctor's recommendation. Because the 1964 World's Fair will be in New York at that time, they expect big crowds, requiring two services.

God's Omniscience

Dr. King references the Biblical Book of Psalms regarding God's omniscience. King notes that God knows everything before it is even done. This, however, does not have an effect on human free will.

Letter from William M. Gray to Ralph Abernathy

Monday, April 8, 1968

William Gray offers his prayers and support as Rev. Abernathy takes over command of the SCLC following Dr. King's death.

God

Dr. King cites a scripture that derives from the Old Testament biblical book of Deuteronomy, stating "the seeing of God's face meant death."

Letter from Pastor G. Murray Branch to MLK

Wednesday, June 7, 1967

In this letter, Pastor Branch invites Dr. King to be the speaker on the 90th Anniversary of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church.

Funeral

Dr. King quotes Shakespeare's "Hamlet."

War in Vietnam Must Be Ended

Friday, December 31, 1965

Marriner S. Eccles, a banker and former governor of the Federal Reserve System, urges an end to the Vietnam War, saying the U.S. is violating international law and has taken over the war to fight communism in Vietnam. He believes the billions spent on war would be more effective in preventing the spread of communism if spent on eliminating poverty and illiteracy in the developing countries.

Letter to MLK from Alan Westin

Friday, April 8, 1966

Alan F. Westin invites Dr. King to serve on the Board of Governors of the Center for Research and Education in American Liberties of Columbia Univeristy and Teachers College. Westin describes the mission of the Center and asks Dr. King to join in their efforts of developing civil rights teaching techniques to be used in all levels of public education.

Why We Cant Wait Sticker

This document is a New American Library window sticker advertising Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Samuel Starr to MLK

Friday, January 12, 1968

Mr. Starr shares his thoughts regarding the "negro people," suggesting they go back to Africa and organize civilization under Dr. King's leadership.