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Letter from Dora McDonald to Martin Peretz

Wednesday, October 11, 1967

In this letter, Ms. McDonald informs Dr. Peretz that Dr. King will be able to have lunch with him and that he will be accompanied by Reverend Andrew Young, Reverend Bernard Lee and herself.

Liberation: Our Struggle

Sunday, April 1, 1956

Dr. King contributes an article to the "Liberation" publication explaining the reasons for the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott. He conveys the issues involving segregation on buses, the demise of Negro inferiority and the miscalculations of white Montgomery civic leaders. According to Dr. King, "Every attempt to end the protest by intimidation, by encouraging Negroes to inform, by force and violence, further cemented the Negro community and brought sympathy for our cause from men of good will all over the world."

Mr. Reed, Mr. Baldwin and Slums

Dr. King writes a story pertaining to a Mr. Reed and Mr. Baldwin to describe the importance of keeping after one's soul.

Thank You Letter from MLK to Dr. J.M. Stansberry

Monday, July 20, 1964

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation to Dr. Stansberry for his contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King states that without the aid from supporters, the initiatives of SCLC could not be carried out effectively.

People to People: The Negro Looks at Africa

Saturday, December 8, 1962

In his column in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King reports on the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa that brought together a cross-section of the Negro community to discuss foreign policy toward Africa. He writes that colonialism and segregation are siblings and that the future of the emerging nations of Africa and the American Negro are interrelated. He speaks of the contradictions in policy toward Africa, the need for more Negroes in the diplomatic corps, and the importance of action by the Administration against racism at home and racism in US foreign policy.

God (His Love)

Dr. King writes that the answer to F. W. H. Myers' question about whether the universe is friendly lies at the basis of religion. His cites E. C. Wilm's "The Problem of Religion."

Greeks

Dr. King shares his personal insight on Greek and African "ability," relative to African-Americans.

Is Nonviolence Doomed To Fail?

Dr. King enumerates the accomplishments made in the fight for civil rights through nonviolent practices. Additionally, he utilizes this article in the Associated Negro Press to discredit the claim that nonviolence is losing shape in the United States.

Note Regarding Boycotting Olympic Game

This is a brief handwritten note of appreciation for encouraging the boycott of the Olympic Games.

Telegram from Bea Stanley to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967

Bea Stanley writes to Dr. King during his confinement at the Jefferson County Courthouse Jail. Stanley informs him that many of his supporters and friends are concerned regarding his health and safety, and also updates him on the progress of one of his publications.

Letter from Mildred Hood to MLK

Saturday, May 7, 1966

Mildred Hood explains to Dr. King what she and her daughter experienced at the Cook County Hospital in Chicago. Hood wants to know what she can do about the situation.

Fundamentalism

Dr. King discusses the concept of religious fundamentalism as it relates to the Christian faith.

Letter from Jo Ellen Braveman to MLK

Jo Ellen Braveman, Secretary of the Human Relations Club of Julia Richman High School, presents Dr. King with the Julia Richman Brotherhood Award. Braveman says, "You truly deserve this award because of your dedicated outstanding work in Human Relations."

Letter from John E. Farrow to MLK

Monday, November 18, 1963

John Farrow writes Dr. King to suggest he tread softly as he continues the fight for social justice. Farrow states that whites will fight back with brute force against desegregation and civil rights for all. Farrow urges Dr. King to offer knowledge but not seek to antagonize whites during the March on Washington and his future efforts for the civil rights movement.

Eartha, Verbal Tempest, Flies to Los Angeles

This article references statements made by entertainer Eartha Kitt during a White House luncheon for women. Kitt expressed her concerns about the impact of the Vietnam War on American families and their sons.

Letter from Don Blaine to MLK

Thursday, August 26, 1965

Don Blaine seeks advice from Dr. King concerning the idea of organizing a peace caravan that would travel throughout the United States. Blaine views this suggestion as a way to garner international support for peace.

Adverse Note to MLK on Political Cartoon

This anonymous critic of Dr. King described their grievances on a political cartoon from The Birmingham News that referred to Dr. King as a hypocrite.

Outline Regarding Jacques Maritain

Dr. King outlines in great detail Catholic philosopher Jacques Maritain's views on: communism, democracy, politics, and the relation between church and state.

Comment On Proposed Resolution: Ending Racism in the Democratic Party

Friday, October 9, 1964

On October 9th, 1964, the Democratic National Convention adopted a resolution ending racial discrimination in Party membership.

New Attack on Highlander Folk School

Tuesday, July 16, 1963

The Southern Conference Educational Fund distributed this "Action Memo" to generate support for Highlander High School in a fight against the State of Tennessee.

Telegram from Terrence Hallinan to MLK

Tuesday, November 7, 1967

Mr. Hallinan requests Dr. King's assistance in aiding a service member undergoing a "court martial for refusal to go to Vietnam."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Nina C. Brown

Wednesday, January 13, 1965

Dora McDonald provides Nina C. Brown with details about Dr. King's upcoming appearance at Pennsylvania State University.

News from the American Jewish Committee

Wednesday, February 14, 1968

This news release announces that John Gardner, former Secretary of Health (among other positions) accepted the head position of the Urban Coalition, a campaign that combats urban poverty.

Invitation from Gene Joseph to MLK

In this note to Dr. King, Gene Joseph says that he is planning a trip to visit the troops in Vietnam. Mr. Joseph then asks Dr. King to take a special collection that will sponsor one of their members for the trip.

Letter from Mrs. William Wenger to MLK

Mrs. Wenger pleads with Dr. King to never give up the fight for civil rights.

"Green Power" for Negroes

This SCLC news release documents the success of "a pioneer agreement between the Chicago Freedom Movement and a large grocery chain." As a product of Operation Breadbasket, this development cycled both jobs and capital to keep them organic to the Negro community.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An anonymous individual sends Dr. King newspaper clippings showing African-Americans participating in looting and violence. Dr. King is asked to review the articles and offer comments via television.

Letter from Sarah Harvey to MLK

Saturday, December 9, 1961

An "English Quaker" thanks Dr. King for his letter and references an impending donation. The contributor informs Dr. King that she intends on communicating with her bank to find out if she can transfer the whole sum and promises to have definite news soon.

Bill of Complaint: City Board of Education of Birmingham, Alabama

Friday, May 10, 1963

The City Board of Education of Birmingham, Alabama accuses several civil rights leaders and organizations of discouraging Negro students from attending public schools.

Letter from Eleanor Bell Barnard to MLK

Tuesday, January 10, 1967

Eleanor Bell Barnard expresses her appreciation for Dr. King's position on Vietnam and Civil Rights. Ms. Barnard also describes to Dr. King how his work is motivation to those who are unemployed.