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Letter from Alberta Brown to MLK

Monday, July 26, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

The Adah Grand Chapter write Dr. King regarding an enclosed check for the SCLC.

Letter from Harriet Davis to Dr. King Regarding Eugene Peterson's editorial

Sunday, July 30, 1967
Georgia (GA)

In this letter, Harriet Davis informs Dr. King that she is a white women who has decided to teach at a Fairmont High School, which was formerly completely Negro. Although she has received criticism for her decision she proclaims that her motivations are right. She then informs Dr. King that she fears not being able to understand her co-workers and students.

Letter from Mildred Maroney to MLK about a Donation

Thursday, May 11, 1967
Washington, D.C.

In this letter Mildred Maroney of the Brookings Institute forwards a donation which was an honorarium due to Mr. Robinson Hollister. This was done because Mr. Hollister requested that the honorarium be donated to the SCLC on his behalf.

Letter from Linda Robinson to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965
Berkeley, CA, California (CA)

Linda Robinson, a sixth grade student at Lincoln School in California, writes Dr. King expressing her admiration towards him for his work with the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from MLK to J. Martin England

Tuesday, September 21, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King express his appreciation for Mr. J. Martin England's support.

Making the Best of a Bad Mess

In this sermon, Dr. King discusses the letter Paul sent to Titus while he was in Crete. According to the letter, Crete was a terrible place for Christians, and Titus may have been confused as to why he was left there. Paul wrote to him saying that he left him there to make the situation better for the other people there. That is how one makes the best out of a bad mess.

McGraw-Hill Requests MLK Comment for New Author

Wednesday, November 8, 1967
New York, NY

An editor from McGraw-Hill Book Company writes Dr. King to introduce the work of young African-American author Audrey Lee. The company sends him a galley copy of "The Clarion People", in the hope that he will add a positive remark to help promote the book.

Letter from Thomas Price to MLK

Thursday, October 8, 1964
Maryland (MD), Baltimore, MD, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., New Jersey (NJ), Massachusetts (MA)

Major Thomas Price, United States Army, requests Dr. King's assistance in retaining his commission and active duty service with the United States Army.

SCLC News Bulletin

Wednesday, November 1, 1967
Cleveland, OH, Chicago, IL, ISRAEL, Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS), Lowndes County, AL

This SCLC bulletin to supporters details the organization's progress in numerous locations, including its growing presence in northern cities such as Cleveland, Operation Breadbasket in Chicago, and the Citizenship Education Program. A "Fiscal Facts" section stresses that Dr. King receives no salary from SCLC, nor any other income from his work with the organization.

Why Pay for Segregation?

Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), North Carolina (NC), Virginia (VA), Louisiana (LA), Arkansas (AR)

In this appeal to the public, the author personifies segregation and urges Negroes to stop spending money at any store that practices segregation until segregation is dead and buried.

Letter from Prarthana Samaj Bombay (India) to MLK

Wednesday, April 14, 1965
New York, NY, INDIA, London, England, NETHERLANDS

The former ambassador of India to the United States previously wrote Dr. King, inviting him to the Centenary Celebrations. The author recalls this invitation and references the history of Bombay's Prarthana Samaj. The organization is founded on the betterment of society, religion and education. The Prarthana Samaj would be proud to welcome Dr. King, as he is an "apostle" of Mahatma Gandhi.

Telegram from Francis Lucas to Lucille Banta

Friday, January 17, 1969

Francis Lucas, assistant to Coretta Scott King, informs Lucille Banta of a scheduling conflict. She also requests information about which people "have agreed to sign the cable gram to His Holiness Pope Paul."

Letter from J. M. Lawson Jr. to MLK

Wednesday, September 13, 1967
Memphis, TN, Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., Cleveland, OH, Atlanta, GA

Minister J. M. Lawson Jr. served as director of nonviolent education for SCLC from 1960 to 1967. In this letter to Dr. King he expresses concerns about program efforts for the summer and fall seasons. Mr. Lawson is conscious of the necessary redirection of the project and informs Dr. King that he has recommendations.

Telegram from MLK to Senator Robert Kennedy

Monday, March 18, 1963
Washington, D.C., Virginia (VA)

Dr. King requests that Senator Robert Kennedy initiate an investigation into complaints about the actions of police during demonstrations in Petersburg, Virginia.

May 1963, Letter from William M. Kunstler to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. requesting television interview

Wednesday, May 15, 1963
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

William M. Kunstler "Bill" writes to inform Dr. King of the National Educational Television's interest in doing a series of programs on the American Negro. Henry Norgenthau would like to interview Dr. King for the series.

Letter from Representative Stanley R. Tupper to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965
Washington, D.C.

Maine Congressman Stanley R. Tupper acknowledges his receipt of Dr. King's telegram concerning the Washington D. C. Home Rule Bill. He informs Dr. King that he will sign the discharge petition for the bill if it remains obstructed by a committee for much longer.

A Letter to MLK to President Lyndon B. Johsnon

Friday, April 13, 1962
Atlanta, GA

In a letter to MLK, President Lyndon B. Johnson addresses the issue of Federal employment in Atlanta. Johnson informs King of the previous meeting held with the Civil Service Commission and the steps being taken to move forward.

Operation Breadbasket Program Hosts MLK

Thursday, May 26, 1966
Chicago, IL

This program acts as proof of direct action as Dr. King, Reverend Newberry, Reverend Jesse Jackson, and Reverend Johnson present Operation Breadbasket to New Friendship Church.

Letter from MLK to Daniel Casten, M.D.

Tuesday, July 26, 1966
New York, NY, Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King took the opportunity to address this letter to Daniel Casten, M.D. thanking him for his financial donation to the Mississippi "James Meredith" March. He noted that the march allowed Negroes, in Mississippi, to resolve their fears and fight for justice. A key quotation, in this document, stated to Dr. Casten, "You are a part of that dedicated group of people standing as a beacon light of hope to all of the disinherited men and women of our nation."

Letter from Julius H. Avery to MLK

Monday, November 14, 1966
Florida (FL), Atlanta, GA

Julius H. Avery notifies Dr. King that he will be in Atlanta for a conference at the Home Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Convention. Mr. Avery further requests that during his visit to the city, he and Dr. King arrange a meeting.

Letter from L. K. Jackson to President Kennedy

Washington, D.C., Indiana (IN), Birmingham, AL

Dr. Jackson produces a copy of this telegram sent to President John F. Kennedy, in which he requests the president use his executive power to suppress violent racial tensions in the South. This telegram was prompted by the bombing of a church in Birmingham, Alabama that killed four little girls.

Telegram from Dow Kirkpatrick to MLK and Mrs. King

Wednesday, January 27, 1965
Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dow Kirkpatrick congratulates Dr. King and apologizes for his absence at the event.

Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy's Statement Following MLK's Assasination

Sunday, April 7, 1968
Memphis, TN, Washington, D.C., Tennessee (TN)

Rev. Abernathy acknowledges the deep pain and anger those in SCLC feel at the senseless taking of Dr. King’s life. They pledge that his work and commitment to nonviolence will continue. They are as much against violence, says Abernathy, as they are against racial and economic injustice. He announces that Mrs. King will join him in leading a march in Memphis in support of the sanitation workers and that the Poor People’s Campaign will proceed. He calls upon Congress to respond to the major loss represented by Dr.

Dexter Echo: March 2, 1960

Wednesday, March 2, 1960
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

This edition of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church newsletter, The Dexter Echo, reports information about upcoming events and the latest news, including a recent gift made to Dr. King and his family. A key article speaks to the power and necessity of worship.

Letter from Robert W. Fischer to MLK

Monday, January 27, 1964
Washington, D.C., ITALY

Robert Fischer is a collector of autographed TIME magazine covers that feature famous personalities. He requests the cover with Dr. King's portrait, so that he may add it to his growing collection.

Letter from Aggrey Oji to Theodore Brown

Tuesday, March 28, 1967
New York, NY, NIGERIA

Mr. Oji writes Mr. Brown thanking him for a previous correspondence of support regarding various issues in Nigeria. Mr. Oji also offers to meet with Mr. Brown and other members of the American Negro Leadership Conference to discuss further issues.

Telegram from SCLC to Miss Geneva Jones

Tuesday, August 17, 1965
Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA)

The SCLC writes Miss Geneva Jones providing her information on their traveling agenda for a trip to McIntosh, Georgia.

Letter from Cass Canfield to MLK

Thursday, May 4, 1967
New York, NY

Cass Canfield, of Harper & Row, informs Dr. King about the enclosure of the first copy of "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Letter From MLK to Judge B.

Thursday, February 1, 1968
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes to Judge B, inviting him to the Board Meeting in Washington D.C. The meeting is to discuss the War in Vietnam and Poor People's Campaign.

Letter from National Committee for Free Elections in Sunflower to MLK

Monday, August 14, 1967
Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), New York, NY

The National Committee for Free Elections in Sunflower informs Dr. King of the tremendous strides made by the African American community during the elections in Sunflower County, Mississippi. Four years prior, the loss of elections by black candidates was attributed to local intimidation, but new organizational tactics provided the group with tools to combat this issue. The success of the election set a precedent for many other Mississippi counties to view voting rights as a means to change citizens' lives and the nature of the state.