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Letter from William Kivi to MLK

Saturday, May 13, 1967

William Kivi warns Dr. King that Senator Edward Brooke is a danger to the progress made as a result of the civil rights movement. Sen. Brooke alleges that Dr. King caused major harm to the movement once he chose to speak out against the Vietnam War. In Kivi's view of Brooke and his policies, "He reasons like a true Republican-out to feather his own nest at the expense of the entire negro race-worldwide."

Statement by Congresswoman Leonor K. Sullivan

Tuesday, November 28, 1967

Congresswoman Leonor K. Sullivan issues a statement on the passing of the Consumer Credit Protection Act of 1967.

Letter from J. T. Brooks to Dr. and Mrs. MLK

Monday, November 16, 1953

Dexter Avenue Baptist Church representative J. T. Brooks conveys the church's interest in considering Dr. King for the pastorate.

Letter from MLK to Howard O. Eaton

Wednesday, December 29, 1965

Dr. King writes Howard Eaton to explain that he will have his assistants read and brief him on the document due to his limited amount of time. He expresses that the document is a worthy contribution to the movement and he and his staff are appreciative.

Letter from Mark Cohen to MLK

Saturday, September 25, 1965

Mark Cohen, of the Political Union of Central High School, requests for Dr. King to speak at the school regarding peace and civil rights on the same day he's addressing the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom in Philadelphia.

The Dimensions of a Complete Life

Dr. King begins this sermon with the story of John's first sight of the holy city of Jerusalem. He uses the story to emphasize "an eternal truth which we must forever recognize, and that is that life at its best and life as it should be is the life that is complete on all sides." This famous sermon had been drafted several times and also takes up the name "Three Dimensions of A Complete Life."

Letter from Richard Schweiker to MLK

Tuesday, October 5, 1965

Representative Richard Schweiker offers his gratitude to Dr. King for his support for home rule in the District of Columbia. He, however, states that the legislation has been defeated on the floor of Congress. Schweiker urges persistence to see that home rule is established in Washington, D.C.

Religion

This document is a notecard titled "Religion," in which Dr. King expounds on John Dewey's definition of religion in "A Common Faith" as a "purely ethical meaning" of religion.

Letter From Philip S. Riggs to MLK

Friday, March 24, 1967

In this letter, Philip Riggs writes to express his difference of opinion with Dr. King regarding the treatment of House Representative Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter from Archon Bowen to MLK

Monday, February 26, 1968

Mr. Bowen, Chairman of the Nominating Committee for Sigma Pi Phi Kappa Boule, expresses concern to Dr. King regarding a decrease in membership due to a high mortality rate of members throughout the nation. Enclosed is a membership nomination form to be completed and returned to the Chairman.

Non-Violence Takes Courage: King's Wife

Friday, March 29, 1968

Mrs. Coretta Scott King elaborates on her commitment to nonviolence, referring to it as "the best instrument of change," throughout her involvement in the Civil Rights and Peace Movements.

Letter from Chester Robinson to Harry Belafonte

Friday, October 6, 1961

In this letter, the Executive Director and Field Organizer of WSO - West Side Organization, in Chicago, asks Harry Belefonte to work with some of the youth in their community.

Letter from Jeanne Whitaker to MLK

Jeanne Whitaker does not oppose the slogan "Black Power", however she identifies the distinction between power and violence. Mrs. Whitaker elaborates on the influence of non-violence that was rooted from Mahatma Gandhi's methodology and practice.

Letter from Dora Byron to MLK

Saturday, November 23, 1963

The assistant director for the Office of Community Educational Service at Emory University invites Dr. King to appear on a local television program. She informs Dr. King that the program will feature influential leaders from the South and consist of a 30-minute interview by an Emory faculty member. In closing, she asks Dr. King to commit to a date between March 19 and April 16, 1963.

Adverse Postcard to MLK

American Opinion illustrates a propaganda postcard of Dr. King that accuses him of being a communist. The photo on the postcard was taken at the Highlander School in 1957 which trained leaders in nonviolent passive resistance.

Crisis In the Nation

Dr. King and Joseph E. Lowery inform an anonymous recipient of an urgent meeting of the SCLC Executive Board.

Customer's Reciept from MLK to Morehouse College

This document is a customer's receipt from Dr. Martin L. King Jr. to Morehouse College.

Letter from W. David Angus to MLK

Friday, October 25, 1963

W. David Angus extends an invitation for Dr. King to speak to the members of the Canadian Club of Montreal about the Civil Rights Movement.

Leibniz

This twenty card series gives a biographical sketch of the German mathematician and philosopher Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz. It also intricately details many aspects of Leibnizean philosophy under multiple subject titles including "Notion of Force," "Idealism," "Monads," "Leibniz as Compared with Predecessors," "The Mind-Body Problem," "Panpsychism," "Theory of Knowledge," and "Arguments for the Existence of God."

Letter from MLK to Matthew Schoenwald

Thursday, August 20, 1964

Dr. King thanks Matthew Schoenwald and the members of the Undergarment and Negligee Workers Union for their contribution to SCLC.

Seventh Annual Gandhi Memorial Lecture

Sunday, November 6, 1966

Howard University presents Dr. King as its primary speaker for their seventh annual Gandhi Memorial Lecture in 1966. Dr. King traces the slow but meaningful progress society has made from slavery to the current civil rights movement. However, he notes that the present challenges in achieving equality involve not only the silence of individuals of good will but also the conditons that keep the Negro inferior.

Letter from President of Yugoslav Baptist Union to MLK

Tuesday, January 3, 1967

The President of the Yugoslav Baptist Union writes excitedly as he finds out Dr. King will be in his country. He requests that Dr. King stop by the church or his home during his short visit.

MLK Speech Outline

This document contains a preliminary speech outline by Dr. King. The topic of the talk is "The Rising Tide of Racial Consciousness," and in it Dr. King maintains that, "We must continue to courageously challenge the system of segregation."

Nobel Foundation's Invitation to Dr. and Mrs. King

The Consul General of Sweden requests the presence of both Dr. and Mrs. King. The Kings are offered an invitation to meet the director of the Nobel Foundation and attend a reception in New York.

Letter from a Fellow American to MLK

Thursday, December 14, 1967

This anonymous author expresses his concern regarding SNCC; explaining that the organization and its leaders have a communist backing. The author closes the letter with references to jobs, education, and a list of several small countries in need of assistance.

Notes about Books

Dr. King opposes the existence of books that degrade the Negro image and falsely contribute to a "national brainwashing." He cites quotations from novelist John Steinbeck, which discourse on the "sacred" nature of a book.

Letter from A. Dolezalek to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968

A. Dolezaler, director of a German library, requests a copy of a poster published by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He would like to add the poster to a collection about social, political movements.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. and Mrs. Robert Wise

Friday, October 4, 1963

Dora McDonald writes to Mr. and Mrs. Robert Wise to inform them of a transfer of funds to the intended recipient.

Letter from Thomas Hirst to MLK

Tuesday, November 1, 1966

Thomas E. Hirst re-extends Dr. King an invitation for a speaking engagement at the Law School Forum of the University of Alberta. The Law School Forum publicly presents many intellectuals to present to their audience and provide community service. Mr. Hirst asserts that Canada serves as a neighbor to the United States and is concerned with the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Jan Jansen to MLK

Thursday, February 20, 1964

Jan Helgo Jansen sends a letter on the behalf of the student organizations in Norway, Denmark and Sweden, inviting Dr. King to speak in Scandinavia.