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Letter from Saul Miller to MLK

Tuesday, September 13, 1966

Saul Miller, Director of the Department of Publications for the AFL-CIO, writes Dr. King requesting him to write a description of the activities of the SCLC. This write-up will be featured in the November issue of the AFL-CIO magazine, which will be devoted entirely to the issue of civil rights.

J.H. Emms to MLK

J.H. Emms offers his approval and support to Dr. King regarding his position on Civil Rights and the Vietnam problem, which were expressed at speeches in Los Angeles and New York.

Letter from Mrs. Berdeax to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

Mrs. Berdeax of Ohio informs Dr. King that she supports his position on the war in Vietnam and is ashamed of her country.

Telegram from Stanley Levison to Coretta Scott King

Friday, January 17, 1969

Stanley Levison warns Mrs. King about interceding between governments.

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to Dora McDonald

Friday, January 13, 1967

Ernest Shaefer, the Executive Secretary of Hadley Executive Committee, attempts to reschedule an event previously canceled by Dr. King. Shaefer informs Dr. King's secretary, Ms. McDonald, of the hundreds of people that purchased tickets to attend the event and their desire to have it rescheduled.

Letter from MLK to Michael Swann

Thursday, September 21, 1967

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak at St. Giles Cathedral in Edinburgh, Scotland on selected dates in 1967 and 1968. He assures the recipient of the letter that he is grateful for the invitation, however, he states that he already has commitments on the proposed dates.

Invitation from Saint Vincent College to MLK

Friday, March 8, 1963

Ralph J. Hils Jr., Director of Assemblies, invites Dr. King to address the student body at St. Vincent's College. He shares a local encounter with discrimination against their American and African Negro students. Mr. Hils outlines the history of the college and provides the names of other prominent visitors of the campus.

Letter from G. P. Beckman to MLK

Thursday, November 3, 1960

G. P. Beckman writes to Dr. King expressing his appreciation for people of similar faith. He asserts that he loves the black race as a whole and because of this love he does not want his children to grow up and experience similar persecutions.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald about Book Autographs

Friday, August 28, 1964

With this letter Joan Daves sends three copies of "Why We Cant Wait" to Ms. McDonald requesting them to be autographed by Dr. King and returned to the specified recipients.

Antidotes For Fear

Dr. King uses this sermon to discuss the causation of human fears while identifying four ways in which these shortcomings can be combated. He does not promote the eradication of all human fears, for some are essential to creation and innovation. However, Dr. King encourages the elimination of unfounded fears as a method to overcome adversities that are experienced in life.

Letter from Maryknoll College to MLK

Thursday, March 14, 1968

Patrick J. Ryan, the Campaigning Committee Coordinator at Maryknoll College, requests that Dr. King provide materials such as his political views, stickers, posters and more to support his political campaign and bring political consciousness to the student body.

Institute on Nonviolent Resistance to Segregation

Tuesday, August 11, 1959

The SCLC publishes this manifesto declaring that all eyes are focused on the South as it confronts the controversial issues of freedom and equality for Negroes. In the quest for equality, the southern Negros' plan of defense is Christian love and non-violent resistance. The document not only reveals tragic conditions in the South, but also affirms five principles by which equality can be achieved for Negro citizens.

MLK's Address to Syracuse University

Thursday, July 15, 1965

Dr. King, in a public speech at Howard University, talks about numerous factors that affect education in America.

Letter from MLK to Catriona Cole White

Tuesday, March 26, 1968

Dr. King writes to Mrs. Catriona Cole White to thank her for her contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Foundation. He explains that their recent projects have included voter registration in the south.

Two Poems for MLK

The unknown author writes two poems titled, "A Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr." and "Time! Time!! Time!!!" One of the poems uses the letters of Dr. King's name for the leading word of each verse.

Points for Progress, Birmingham, Alabama

This is a list or outline of points for progress in the Birmingham Campaign. They may have been used in a face-to-face presentation with local community leaders or with media officials. These words carefully enumerate the demands or wishes of the civil rights leaders and the Negro community.

Telegram from Dora McDonald to E. M. Bettenson

Monday, September 11, 1967

Dora McDonald informs Mr. E. M. Bettenson from the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne of a date that Dr. King will be available to receive an Honorary Degree.

Arnobius

Dr. King gives information on fourth century teacher, Arnobius and his conversion to Christianity.

Theology and Science

Dr. King cites Albert Knudson's "The Doctrine of God" as a source on theology and science.

Letter from Robert Gabor to MLK

Thursday, June 27, 1963

Robert Gabor writes Dr. King inviting him to Oslo, Norway to speak at the 7th International Congress of the International Union of Socialist Youth. Gabor expresses to Dr. King that their organization supports "the present struggle of the American Negro."

Request from Wm. James Stuart to MLK

Monday, June 14, 1965

Wm. James Stuart, a student, seeks the recommendation of books that helped Dr. King develop his own way of preaching.

A Message from Jail

Saturday, July 21, 1962

After being arrested and charged with parading without a license, Dr. King wrote a column from jail. The column shared his and Ralph David Abernathy's decision to serve the jail sentence instead of paying a fine of $178.

MLK's Speech on Civil Rights and Vietnam

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

Dr. King speaks about his role as a leader of the Civil Rights Movement and his position on the Vietnam War.

Letter from Andrew Heiskell to MLK

Tuesday, July 25, 1967

Mr. Heiskell extends an invitation for Dr. King to join Mayors of major cities and other national leaders in forming a coalition to address urban problems.

Man (Hamlet)

Dr. King quotes from the Shakespearean play.

Letter from W. Russell Chapman to MLK

Monday, January 22, 1962

The York County, Pennsylvania branch of the NAACP sends a second invitation to Dr. King to be a guest speaker.

Letter from Jacob Javits to MLK

Wednesday, May 13, 1964

Senator Jacob Javits expresses his gratitude for an inscribed book that Dr. King sent him.

Letter from the University of Newcastle to MLK

Thursday, February 23, 1967

E. M. Bettenson, the registrar of the University of Newcastle, sends Dr. King a follow up letter inquiring his availability to accept an honorary degree.

Letter from K. B. M. Crooks, Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, November 7, 1967

K. B. M. Crooks, Jr., of the Southeast Regional Office of the National Urban League, writes to Dr. King about a letter of recommendation for Lonnie King, Jr.

Transcendence and Immanence of God

Dr. King quotes Jeremiah 23:23, and he provides his interpretation of the biblical passage.