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Chicago IL The New Crusader: "The World of Books"

Saturday, June 24, 1967

Under the heading "The World of Books", the New Crusader newspaper published this review of Dr. King's last book. The review touches on Dr. King's examination of the Black Power movement and its effect on racial tension in America.

Headquarters Torched After Milwaukee March

This article discusses the destruction of the Freedom House, home of the Milwaukee Youth Council of the N.A.A.C.P. The Freedom House was destroyed by a firebomb, which entered through the front window. Young Negro housing demonstrators attempted to hold a rally on the southside of Milwaukee in support of an open housing ordinance, only to return to a destroyed headquarters. This article was written by Milwaukee's Associated Press.

Newsweek: Road to Selma - Hope & Death

Newsweek issues this synopsis of the 1965 voting rights march from Selma to Montgomery. The article illustrates the details surrounding the brutal racial murder of Viola Liuzzo, delving into the federal investigation of Mrs. Liuzzo's murder and its impact on the future passage of the pending 1965 Voting Rights Act.

The American Jewish Committee

Friday, March 1, 1968

The American Jewish Committee reports on two projects recommended by the Kerner Commission to address "the imbalance between white and Negro in America."

Pueblo Poll: "King's Vietnam Opinion Lacks Majority Support"

Sunday, May 7, 1967

This article contains opinions from various residents of Pueblo, CO, concerning Dr. King's position on the Vietnam War.

At Your Service!

The Washington Office of the Council for Christian Social Action chronicles the events of the organization including various seminars and cooperation with other organizations.

Great Man

Gene Lyle writes the editor of a newspaper article entitled "Americans Need Some Discipline" to address unjustified criticism expressed against Dr. King. The author is certain that the article persuaded some readers that Dr. King "is to be feared and despised" for being a contributor to civil unrest. However, the writer predicts that "Dr. King will enter American one of the great men of all time."

Darien Seeking Negro Teachers

Thursday, November 26, 1964

This article discusses the teacher exchange program between New York City Public Schools and Darien, Connecticut. The program calls for African American teachers to teach students in the predominately white town. The superintendent states the purpose of the project is to show the students that African Americans, if given the same opportunity, are just as intelligent as their white counterparts.

The Spirit of Kinloch

The Spirit of Kinloch is a community newspaper with various articles. Kinloch is the oldest African American community to be incorporated in the state of Missouri.

The Evening Star: The Perversion of a Cause

Monday, March 13, 1967

This article describes the effect of James Meredith's withdrawal from the race for Adam Powell's congressional seat. Civil Rights activists such as Dr. King, Mr. Carmichael and Mr. McKissick offer their opinions on how the race was handled.

Unfair to Put Blame on Mississippi Poor

This editorial in the Tupelo (MS) Daily Journal claims it is unfair to attribute the proposed Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C. to poor Mississippians, who are uneducated and have no knowledge of Congress or how to mount a massive protest. The piece takes both Dr. King and Stokely Carmichael to task for suggesting that the wheels of government be ground to a stop until their demands are met.

Revolution in the Delta: Farm Hands Go on Strike

David R. Underhill discusses the strike of farm laborers in various Mississippi Delta cities. Underhill highlights strike procedures, methods, and locations.

Albany Student Penalty Stressed

Approximately 40 African American students were suspended from school and charged for participating in mob action. The students were suspended for taking part in an anti-segregation demonstration to Albany City Hall. The demonstration included White students as well but they were not punished for their actions. The 40 students planned to appeal their cases to the federal court.

Birmingham Jail

Tuesday, December 7, 1965

Reverend Robert J. Leuver sends Dr. King an article titled "Birmingham Jail.". In the article, Harry Cargas learns that there are some members of the police force who support the Civil Rights Movement, but are too fearful to speak out against the racial atrocities. It was here that Mr. Cargas realized the ongoing struggle for outspoken and silent supporters of the movement for social change.

Newark Evening News: King's Standing Grows

Wednesday, August 24, 1966

This 1966 Newark Evening News article outlines the history and progression of Dr. King's leadership during an SCLC initiative addressing discriminatory living practices in Chicago.

Wilkins Praises Darien Teacher Exchange Setup

Friday, December 11, 1964

Roy Wilkins, Executive Secretary of the NAACP, applauds Darien's efforts to integrate minority and suburban communities through its exchange program with New York City. The program "sought Negro teachers, business and professional people to live and work in their community."

MLK - Out of the Night of Segregation

Saturday, February 1, 1958

This essay by Dr. King is featured in the February 1958 edition of Lutheran Woman's Work. King focuses on nonviolence and segregation while critiquing the sociological impacts of oppression.

What Moderation Means

Saturday, August 14, 1965

Dr. King explores the meaning of the word moderation, and shares his thoughts on its position in relation to nonviolence.

"They are Waiting for Godot in Mississippi, Too"

Sunday, January 31, 1965

This article, posted in the New York Times, discusses the play, "Waiting for Godot," held by the Free Southern Theatre in Mississippi. The play focuses on racial and social issues dealing with civil rights.

The Negro is the Most Glaring Evidence of White American's Hypocrisy

Dr. King shares the desire and need of American Negroes to have a social revolution for equality.

Vietnam and the Conscience of U.S.A.

Monday, May 1, 1967

The author argues that the U.S. is fighting a false bogey of international communism in Vietnam at the expense of Great Society programs at home.

The Lonesome Road

Wednesday, July 12, 1967

Stanley D. Levison sends Dr. King an article from The Washington Post titled "The Lonesome Road," which is a review of Dr. Kings book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" Martin Duberman, the author of the article, explains Dr. King's reasons for writing the book, and Duberman also provides a favorable review of the publication.

Letter From Birmingham City Jail

Wednesday, May 1, 1963

Dr. King's famous "Letter from Birmingham Jail" is a response to a statement written by several Alabama Clergymen. In that statement, the Clergymen assert that Dr. King's methods are both "unwise and untimely." They brand him an "outside agitator" who should not be advocating the breaking of the law. Dr. King responds with this Letter and politely references Biblical, Classical and early American figures to counter the arguments of the Clergymen.

What's Your Brotherhood Quotient?

National Comics Publications, Inc. publishes this questionnaire as a public service to gauge the attitudes of readers while also enlightening readers about their own xenophobic perceptions. The writer asserts that it is okay to dislike vegetables or insects, but to dislike people is to "hurt them and cheat yourself."

War in Vietnam Must Be Ended

Friday, December 31, 1965

Marriner S. Eccles, a banker and former governor of the Federal Reserve System, urges an end to the Vietnam War, saying the U.S. is violating international law and has taken over the war to fight communism in Vietnam. He believes the billions spent on war would be more effective in preventing the spread of communism if spent on eliminating poverty and illiteracy in the developing countries.

To the Negroes of America

Robert Welch compares the American Negro Population to Negro populations around the world in regards to ownership of various consumer items. He asserts that Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, Bayard Rustin and Walter Reuther are shameless liars working in league with communists.

May 17 -- 11 Years Later

Saturday, May 22, 1965

Dr. King discusses the eleven years since the Supreme Court ruled that segregated schools were not constitutional in Brown v. Board of Education. He explains that it was not until the Civil Rights Act of 1964 that people began to understand the harms of segregation.

Press Release: MLK Demands US Action Against Killers of Negroes in Orangeburg, S.C.

Tuesday, February 13, 1968

Dr. King's telegram to United States Attorney General Ramsey Carlk was reprinted in this press release from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. In it, Dr. King urges the Justice department to take proper legal action against the perpetrators of violence against Negroes following the wounding and killing of 37 to 50 students in Orangeburg, South Carolina.

Five Denominations of Protestants Said To Ignore Negroes

This article discusses a claim brought against "five influential Protestant denominations" by members of the Rockefeller Fund for Theological Education. Specifically referenced is Rev. Dr. C. Shelby Rooks, Executive secretary of the fund, who is reported as saying that the American Baptist Convention, the Episcopal, the Methodist, the United Presbyterian Churches, and the United Church of Christ discriminated against African Americans "from the centers of denominational power and decision making." Dr.

Chicago - Striving Toward Progress

The author of this article identifies two leaders, to include Dr. King and Joseph Germano, in the civil rights movement to speak on the new political focus on economic disparities.