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"DuBois State Memorial Proposed; Would Be in Great Barrington"

Monday, February 12, 1968
New York (NY), Massachusetts (MA), Pennsylvania (PA)

William F. Bell writes an article concerning a proposed W. E. Dubois State Memorial in Great Barrington.

People in Action: Recognition and Opportunity

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King states there are two basic elements to human rights: recognition and opportunity.

The New Leader: MLK's Letter from Birmingham Jail

Tuesday, April 16, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Louisiana (LA), New Orleans, LA, GERMANY, Mississippi (MS), Albany, GA

The New Leader, a New York-based biweekly magazine, published Dr. King?s Letter from Birmingham City Jail. This historic piece is a response to the views of some fellow clergymen that Dr. King's methods are both "unwise and untimely.? King's critics had branded him an "outside agitator" and an extremist who should not be advocating lawbreaking. Dr. King responds with this letter and references prominent historical figures to counter these criticisms.

Nonviolent Leaders

Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King, Hosea Williams, and Bernard Lafayette are mentioned and photographed in a newspaper article that has been defaced by external drawings. The article is also covered in adverse commentary about the three leaders.

KCLS Radio Editorial about MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967
Arizona (AZ), Washington, D.C.

James C. Garchow, of KCLS Radio, sent Dr. King a transcript of an editorial to comply with the Fairness Doctrine of the F.C.C. that mandates an opportunity to reply to such commentary.

Which Way for the Negro Now?

Monday, May 15, 1967
California (CA), Nebraska (NE), Nashville, TN, Louisville, KY, New York, NY, Cleveland, OH, Baltimore, MD, Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

In his thirteenth civil rights cover story, Newsweek General Editor Peter Goldman reports on a movement in crisis, with fragmented leadership, impatient black followers, and increasingly alienated white supporters. Goldman and reporters interviewed top leadership ranging from the Urban League’s Whitney Young to black power advocate Stokely Carmichael. This article asks what will become of the Negro Revolution.

Is It All Right To Break The Law?

Monday, August 12, 1963
New York (NY), Birmingham, AL, New York, NY, Alabama (AL)

Excerpts from Dr. King's 1963 "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" are used to establish an affirmative answer to the question, "Is It All Right to Break The Law?"

Racism Blocks Social Aid to Needy

Sunday, November 12, 1967
Denver, CO, SWEDEN

Dr. King writes that overcoming inequality in America will require a "revolution in attitude and values." He calls for a guaranteed annual income and a Bill of Rights just for the disadvantaged.

People In Action: "Virginia's Black Belt"

Saturday, April 14, 1962
Virginia (VA), Mississippi (MS), Prince Edward County, VA, Washington, D.C.

In this article from the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King describes his expereince on his "People to People" tour through the United States, noting his experience in the "black belt" in Virginia.

Observer: The Fiery Savior

Kentucky (KY), VIETNAM

Journalist Ponchitta Pierce sends Dr. King an article that details the press conference of "The Militant." In response to questioning, the individual expresses their discontent with liberal politics, the United States of America, and its presence in Vietnam.

Men Who Live Differently

Illinois (IL), Tokyo, Japan

James E. Will shares a Christian perspective on conformity and its relation to humanity and God.

Pueblo Poll: "King's Vietnam Opinion Lacks Majority Support"

Sunday, May 7, 1967
Colorado (CO)

This article contains opinions from various residents of Pueblo, CO, concerning Dr. King's position on the Vietnam War.

Help For Nigeria

Saturday, March 25, 1967
New York (NY), NIGERIA

Nigeria requests help from Negro civil rights leaders such as Dr. King, Randolph, and Roy Wilkins. Nigerians feel that the hate between the government and its people will result in war.

The Evening Star: The Perversion of a Cause

Monday, March 13, 1967
New York (NY), Washington, D.C.

This article describes the effect of James Meredith's withdrawal from the race for Adam Powell's congressional seat. Civil Rights activists such as Dr. King, Mr. Carmichael and Mr. McKissick offer their opinions on how the race was handled.

Entering 1964: Toward Full Emancipation

Tuesday, December 17, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Philadelphia, PA

In this draft of an article for the NY Amsterdam News, Dr. King asserts that the thrust of the Negro will increase toward full emancipation as they began the year 1964. Dr. King highlights the March on Washington where both Negroes and whites collectively demonstrated the need for self-respect and human dignity in the United States. He also elaborates on the technique of "selective patronage" to broaden the economic and employment opportunities for the African American community.

People to People: Civil Rights and Negative Normalcy

Saturday, March 12, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Jackson, MS, Brooklyn, NY, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA)

Dr. King attempts to answer questions from white liberals concerning the progress and importance of the Civil Rights Movement.

Insight Broward: Bullets, Backflips & Baby-Talk

Florida (FL)

Moreland Smith forwarded a copy of Insight Broward Magazine for Dr. King to view. In this collection of articles, Jim Corvell expresses his disapproval of Alcee Hastings, a local NAACP lawyer, who was a candidate for the House of Representatives. Coryell heatedly describes his efforts to thwart what he called "the [N]egro racist's political plans.

Walk for Freedom

Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

In this article, Dr. King address the issue of racism occurring in Montgomery. It was here that African Americans, including Dr. King, were victims to humiliation and violent acts because of their race. Dr. King further promote nonviolent protest to combat this civil injustice.

White Backlash Growing

Friday, August 26, 1966
Chicago, IL, Denver, CO, ITALY, AUSTRIA, Boston, MA, GERMANY, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, POLAND, GREECE, Los Angeles, CA, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA)

The intensity in the Civil Rights Movement increased as blacks remained segregated and the Black Power movement gained popularity. White backlash increased during these times, but Dr. King noted that demonstrations "did not breed hate, but only revealed hatred that already existed."

Information Regarding the Baha'i Faith

Illinois (IL), AUSTRALIA, ISRAEL, UGANDA, GERMANY

This excerpt on the Baha'i Faith claims that America is to be a leader in bringing world peace. The Baha'i faith has spread worldwide and promotes all religions as having a common golden rule.

Memo from Tom Offenburger to MLK and Others Regarding Article

Monday, January 8, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Albany, GA, Birmingham, AL

Tom Offenburger sends Dr. King a copy of a newspaper clipping from the Atlanta Constitution in which the writer Bruce Galphin expresses his sentiments regarding the often violent occurrences at nonviolent protests.

Walter Winchell: American Talking Back

VIETNAM, Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, California (CA), New York (NY), New York, NY, Texas (TX), Philadelphia, PA

In this article, Walter Winchell provides excerpts of news articles and adds his own commentary to each. Following an excerpt about Dr. King's having a conference to coordinate civil disobedience activities, Winchell urges his leaders to write to Dr. King and "tell him to stop posing as a Man of Peace and 'fess up that his big "act" is causing more trouble than Ho Chi Mihn." Other recipients of Winchell's attention in this column include President Lyndon B. Johnson.

Martin Luther King To Speak in Ithaca

Tuesday, March 28, 1961
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

This article from the Ithaca Journal talks about Dr. King's speaking engagement at Cornell University's Bailey Hall in Ithaca. The article also gives some background information on Dr. King.

"Where Do We Go From Here?" Asks Negro King

Thursday, February 1, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL

In this article, Palmer Van Gundy reviews Dr. King's most recent book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?." He calls the book a must for all Americans, naming Dr. King not just the greatest civil rights leaders, but also a "leader for peace with freedom and justice."

"Race Hate and Divisiveness"

This newspaper clipping depicts Dr. King's decision to move the civil rights movement up north as "one of grave peril to everyone concerned." The author believes that the defiance of the law could cause disaster for the Negro cause.

"Negro Rights: Key Dates"

Louisiana (LA), Texas (TX), Oklahoma (OK)

This image depicts the chronological history of laws passed as it pertains to the life and wellbeing of Negros. The first date of reference is January 1st, 1863, the day when slavery was abolished.

The Danger of A Little Progress

Monday, February 3, 1964
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

This focuses on the issue of short term progress within the Civil Rights Movement because it does not offer long term lasting solutions.

People In Action: The Role of the Church

Dr. King discusses the issues of segregation and the role of the church in rectifying the situation.

Newspaper Article-New York TImes

Thursday, June 18, 1964
New York (NY)

This newspaper clipping is dated from the June 18, 1964 edition of the New York Times. In this article, Dr. King's new book entitled, "Why We Can't Wait" is advertised as "required reading."

World Journal Tribune: Dream and Demagogy

Thursday, April 6, 1967
New York (NY), VIETNAM, Washington, D.C., New York, NY

The World Journal Tribune writes an article entitled "Dream and Demagogy." The article expounds upon Dr. King's involvement of foreign policy in opposition of the Vietnam War. The authors assert that Dr. King actions have crossed a "thin line" between responsible dissent and irresponsible divisiveness. The article criticizes Dr. King for his political activism and details the military's involvement.