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A Country Called Corporate America

Sunday, July 3, 1966

New York Times Magazine writer Andrew Hacker writes about the growing problems caused by the "bigness" of corporate America. He says that large corporations are beginning to have so much power that they can damage the society without having to account for the consequences, as "corporate wealth buys corporate wishes." Some of the ways that they effect society are through their advertisements, their control of the labor market and education.

The Danger of A Little Progress

Saturday, February 15, 1964

In Dr. King's article, The Danger of a Little Progress, he discusses the work of the SCLC and SNCC in correlation to statistics regarding integrated housing and schools, as well as discrimination in employment. Dr. King concludes that there has been little progress among blacks in Atlanta statistically.

Let My People Vote

In this statement for the Amsterdam News, Dr. King assures that a victory is in the midst regarding the Senate's recent passage of the voting bill. He elaborates on the objectives of SCOPE, as there is much to accomplish. He ends the statement with the battle cry, "Let My People Vote."

News Release About Upcoming Lecture by Coretta Scott King

This news release announces Coretta Scott King's upcoming lecture on the Crusade for Voter's Registration entitled "Free in 64-with 6,000 more."

Washington D. C. Star: Negro Lawyer Pushing Town Incorporation Plan

Thursday, October 5, 1967

Congressman John Conyers shares an article with civil rights attorney, Orzell Billingsley. The article highlights Attorney Billingsley's efforts to join 20 predominately black municipalities, so that more African Americans can have a voice within politics and economic development.

Brutality in Mississippi

This document contains two articles that reference CORE worker Scott B. Smith. Disclosing accounts of Smith's experiences in Mississippi, the articles emphasize racially charged brutality as a common occurrence.

"Barnett Says JFK Aids Reds"

Saturday, July 13, 1963

In a testimony before the Senate Commerce Committee, Mississippi Governor Ross R. Barnett expresses his staunch opposition to President Kennedy's recent civil rights legislation. Governor Barnett goes as far as to associate recent Communist Party activities to the recent "racial agitation, strife, and conflict" emerging from the Civil Rights Movement.

The Luminous Promise

Saturday, December 1, 1962

This draft of "The Luminous Promise," published in the December 1962 issue of The Progressive, marks the 100th celebration of the Emancipation Proclamation. In the article Dr. King writes, "there is but one way to commemorate the Emancipation Proclamation. That is to make its declaration of freedom real."

The Strength of the Legacy

Sunday, November 22, 1964

In this New York Herald Tribune article, Dr. King refers to the recent 1964 Presidential election as a decisive repudiation of segregation and extremism. He claims the election results honored the memory of President John F. Kennedy, assassinated a year earlier. Kennedy’s greatest contribution to human rights, King says, was his televised appeal to the American people on June 19, 1963 describing equal rights and equal opportunity as a moral issue as old as the scriptures and as clear as the Constitution.

Articles Regarding Strides Made in the Civil Rights Movement

This SCLC news bulletin published around 1964, discloses information regarding Dr. King and others staying in the Birmingham jail. Also included are updates on the progress of the Civil Rights Movement in various cities, additions and changes within the SCLC and relationships with familiar and notable personalities.

Thousands Protest Bombings

This article discusses the numerous civil rights demonstrations taking place around the country surrounding the 1963 Birmingham church bombings.

Political Cartoon: The FBI Adds

This satirical cartoon in the Nashville Banner equates protests in the U.S. with the Communist buildup in Vietnam.

Brotherhood Cannot Be a Theory

Friday, February 19, 1965

This newspaper clipping of The Southern Israelite features segments on the Atlanta banquet honoring Dr. King's acceptance of the Nobel Peace Prize. Given on his return to the States, there were twelve hundred and fifty Atlanta citizens in attendance. Included articles are: welcoming comments by Rabbi Jacob Rothschild, a tribute by Archbishop Paul Hallinan, and a transcription of Dr. King's speech.

The Catholic Review: Letter From Birmingham Jail

Friday, July 19, 1963

Dr. King's "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" is printed in this publication along with articles and columns illustrating the Church's civil rights activities. Efforts included priests taking part in direct action to integrate an amusement park and an archbishop backing the civil rights bill.

MLK Fights For Peace

Saturday, April 1, 1967

Included on page four of this Bedding, Curtain and Drapery Workers Union newsletter is an article regarding Dr. King's courageous efforts in helping Negros achieve equality, and the support he has received from the trade union. The union also supports Dr. King's stand against the Vietnam war, and agrees that the war is harming America's domestic programs against poverty.

MLK to Confer in June to Plan Summer Drive Here

Monday, May 29, 1967

Referencing Dr. King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Bob Modic wrote about an upcoming meeting in Cleveland, Ohio. This meeting was in preparation for the implementation of a campaign to increase employment and housing opportunities for the city's African Americans.

Executive "Action Team" of Dr. King's SCLC Leads Aggressive Programs for Human Rights

Monday, February 5, 1968

This news release discusses programs developed by the SCLC Executive Action Team to aggressively address the human rights struggles of the American Negro. Some of these programs include the Citizenship Education Program, Operation Breadbasket and the Urban Leadership Program.

Newark Evening News: King's Standing Grows

Wednesday, August 24, 1966

This 1966 Newark Evening News article outlines the history and progression of Dr. King's leadership during an SCLC initiative addressing discriminatory living practices in Chicago.

Ebony: Advice For Living

Thursday, May 1, 1958

Dr. King answers readers' questions regarding family dynamics, the NAACP, outer versus inner beauty and the image of Negroes in literature and the media. He advocates for open communication and pleasant attitudes in familial relationships, and he offers hope that the portrayal of Negroes in movies and "other public channels" is improving.

Civil-Righters Isolation

Saturday, April 1, 1967

David Lawrence states that the recent initiatives of Negro leaders are hindering the overall mission of the Civil Rights Movement. He believes that Negro groups are defeating their own cause.

Commentary on MLK Article

This article describes Dr. King's approval of a recent civil rights ordinance passing in Gary, Indiana. The purpose of the ordinance is to prohibit discrimination in the sale, rental, leasing or financing of real estate. Dr. King thanks the community and members of the City Council for making the ordinance possible.

A Southern Point of View

Eliza Paschall writes this article to express her feelings toward the Georgia legislature's willingness to close down the schools rather than integrate them. Paschall states that "segregation is a disease that infects all parts of a being, human or political." The time for action is now, so that equality can be achieved by all.

The Nation: Hammer of Civil Rights

Monday, March 9, 1964

This article by Dr. King appeared in the March 9, 1964, edition of The Nation. Dr. King discusses the impetus for the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Kennedy and Johnson Administrations' commitment to the cause. Recognizing the complexity of such a political movement, King lauds the President Johnson for fighting off attempts to weaken the bill. King also recognizes the achievements of the Fair Employment Committee, established by President Kennedy and headed by then-Vice President Johnson, in providing employment opportunities for many southern Negroes.

Should F.E.P.C. Become a Federal Law?

In this draft article Dr. King discusses employment discrimination and the need for the Fair Employment Practices Commission to become legislation.

Chicago IL The New Crusader: "The World of Books"

Saturday, June 24, 1967

Under the heading "The World of Books", the New Crusader newspaper published this review of Dr. King's last book. The review touches on Dr. King's examination of the Black Power movement and its effect on racial tension in America.

Memo from Tom Offenburger to MLK and Others Regarding Article

Monday, January 8, 1968

Tom Offenburger sends Dr. King a copy of a newspaper clipping from the Atlanta Constitution in which the writer Bruce Galphin expresses his sentiments regarding the often violent occurrences at nonviolent protests.

A Call to Vietnam Week

This article discusses the Call to Vietnam Week, scheduled to take place April 8 through the 15th. The goal of this event was to promote grass roots awareness of war's destruction.

The Man Who Knows: General Westmoreland on Vietnam

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

This editorial from a New York newspaper features statements from General William C. Westmoreland arguing for the public's support "about what is going on in Viet Nam, and why." Dr. King is among those listed as having opposing viewpoints towards the War.

Article Written by the Spring Mobilization Committee To End the War in Vietnam

The following article written by the Spring Mobilization Committee illustrates the growing international support for ending the Vietnam War. It specifically highlights the Union of Vietnamese Students in France, an organization seeking to cooperate with American students in order to promote peace in Vietnam.

Newspaper Article: "Giving Away a Library"

Sunday, July 10, 1966

This Chicago's Sunday AMERICAN newspaper article discusses the issue concerning the decision of the Chicago Law Institute to give the government their legal library without the consent of the membership.