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"Articles"

Covenant Between Operation Breadbasket and The A&P Company

Chicago, IL

The Chicago Unit of The A&P Company seeks to build a relationship with the Negro community by implementing equal opportunity employment policies. In return, the ministers of Operation Breadbasket will bring to attention the extensive commitment the A&P Company has to the economic and social future of the Negro community.

Reader Strikes Parallel Between America, Nazis

VIETNAM, Illinois (IL)

This document contains two letters to the editor of an unknown newspaper. The first letter is written by Edwin Johnson. He criticizes the war in Vietnam, making comparisons between the Nazis and the American military. E.D., the author of the second letter, also criticizes the war, calling for an end to the violence in Vietnam.

Call to Survival

Sunday, November 5, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY), VIETNAM, Washington, D.C.

This advertisement offers a "realistic appraisal" of the Vietnam situation and offers possible solutions.

U.S. Reds Fan Racist Flames To Stir Vietnam War Protest

New York, NY, Pittsburgh, PA, VIETNAM, New York (NY), Pennsylvania (PA), Stockholm, Sweden, SWEDEN, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

William F. Buckley, a conservative columnist, decries the involvement of Negro leaders such as Dr. King and Stokely Carmichael n a recent Vietnam War protest. He compares Carmichael with members of the Ku Klux Klan, and he also alleges Communist involvement with the protest.

Dr. Luther King Cause of U.S. Violence

Thursday, November 11, 1965
SOUTH AFRICA, New York (NY), Los Angeles, CA

The articles mentions Dr. King and his supposed involvement with the Communist Party. The author is not convinced that Dr. King is the "good Samaritan" everyone believes him to be, and he is ensuring more violence with his cause.

"Rev. King Jumps Back into the Act"

Washington, D.C.

This article expresses how Dr. King wants to take the attention off of the militants and place the focus back on non-violent expression.

Notes on a Letter from Birmingham Jail

Dr. King records notes on three different topics. First, he examines the concept of extremism and individual responses in their respective environments. Next, he expresses disappointment with the white church and its leadership. The final note describes the challenges and hardships of early Christians.

News Article about MLK's Church and Atlanta Housing Project

Atlanta, GA

In this article, the author highlights Dr. King's involvement with a recent urban housing redevelopment project. The author states that the Ebenezer Baptist Church will commit full sponsorship; he later discusses the various plans in more detail and the purpose to community it will serve.

The Social Organization of Nonviolence

Virginia (VA), Arkansas (AR), North Carolina (NC), INDIA, London, England

Dr. King breaks down the structure of a nonviolent movement. He describes at length the difference between "token" integration and true integration. He describes three types of violence that could be used to achieve integration to which he prefers the "wholesome," nonviolent choice. Lastly, Dr. King gives his opinion on the "evils" of war.

"The Negro's Road to Equality" by Roscoe Drummond

Washington, D.C.

This article reports on the historic decision of the United States Supreme Court to end segregation in 1954. Outlining a brief narrative of segregation in America, the writer makes it clear that the decision was imperative and timely.

Negative Letters to the Editor about MLK

Chicago, IL

In these newspaper clippings, four people criticize Dr. King and the SCLC Chicago Campaign of 1966.

"Delaware Hears Nixon Fight Bias"

Friday, October 1, 1954
Delaware (DE), Washington, D.C., California (CA)

This New York Times article provides details about Vice President Richard Nixon's decision to support the end of school segregation.

At Your Service!

Washington, D.C.

The Washington Office of the Council for Christian Social Action chronicles the events of the organization including various seminars and cooperation with other organizations.

Housing Plan at Gadsden Is Upheld

Thursday, October 11, 1962
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

The U.S. Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals rules against Negroes in Gadsden, Alabama who wanted to stop urban redevelopment plan which would segregate the Negroes.

"Question of Credibility"

Sunday, October 16, 1966
Mississippi (MS), New York (NY)

In this article, the author highlights and questions the credibility of The Child Development Group, which was created to assist in educating the youth of Mississippi.

Americans Need Some Discipline

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Chicago, IL, New York, NY, Los Angeles, CA

This Daily Californian editorial calls for "self-restraint" in civil rights demonstrations and a return to the "hard work, thrift, and adherence to the moral precepts that form the basis for this democracy." It continues to maintain that gratuitous demonstrations cause racial riots and violence, provoking the "wrath of whites who resent Negro intrusion in their neighborhoods" and thus undermine political support for Dr. King's cause. Dr.

WDIX: In Whose Interest Is Changing The Law?

Wednesday, March 20, 1968
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Orangeburg, SC

This editorial was broadcast on WDIX, a radio station based out of Orangeburg, South Carolina, on March 20, 1968. The piece questions if President Johnson's actions in favor of civil rights were under the pressure of Dr. King and Stokely Carmichael, stating that the Great Society is an danger. The author further argues that the status of African Americans as been largely improved, just "not as quickly" as they would have hoped and that should be good enough.

Negroes Suffer From Riots, King Writes In New Book

Sunday, June 25, 1967
Oregon (OR)

The Oregonian newspaper published this brief review of Dr. King's last publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?". The article highlights Dr. King's perspective on the negative impact of riots. According to Dr. King, riots were menacing for both black and white communities.

Eartha, Verbal Tempest, Flies to Los Angeles

Washington, D.C., VIETNAM, Los Angeles, CA, New Jersey (NJ), Kansas (KS), Oklahoma (OK)

This article references statements made by entertainer Eartha Kitt during a White House luncheon for women. Kitt expressed her concerns about the impact of the Vietnam War on American families and their sons.

Can You Live Where You Want to Live?

New York (NY), New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ), Pennsylvania (PA)

George and Eunice Grier write regarding the topic "Can you live where you want to live?" This article discusses discrimination and segregation in housing. The Griers assert that integration in jobs and public places is advancing, but segregation in housing still plagues many people in America.

Martin Luther King To Speak in Ithaca

Tuesday, March 28, 1961
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

This article from the Ithaca Journal talks about Dr. King's speaking engagement at Cornell University's Bailey Hall in Ithaca. The article also gives some background information on Dr. King.

Lawyer Ejected By House Inquiry; Seven Walk Out

Thursday, August 18, 1966
Washington, D.C., New York (NY)

New York lawyer Arthur Kinoy was ejected from the hearing room of the House Committee on Un-American Activities in Washington following a heated legal argument. Seven other lawyers withdrew from the proceedings following Mr. Kinoy's ejection.

States Avoid Woes: Hughes and Stanley Attacks Deadbeats in UN

Sunday, January 5, 1964
Des Moines, IA, Iowa (IA), CONGO / ZAIRE, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

These are two articles from the Des Moines Sunday Register. The first article entitled "States Avoid Woes: Hughes" by Donald Kaul focuses on a statement by then Iowa Governor Harold Hughes. Hughes asserts that it is the right and responsibility of the states to solve domestic social problems. The other article explores the opinion of then state representative David Stanley. Stanley believes that all United Nations members should share in the operating costs of the UN.

MLK Supports New York City Teachers

Wednesday, September 13, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King sends telegram of support to the United Federation of Teachers backing them in their efforts to create better conditions to work and educate students.

KCLS Radio Editorial about MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967
Arizona (AZ), Washington, D.C.

James C. Garchow, of KCLS Radio, sent Dr. King a transcript of an editorial to comply with the Fairness Doctrine of the F.C.C. that mandates an opportunity to reply to such commentary.

Why Integration Won't Slow Up

Tuesday, November 20, 1962
Iowa (IA), Mississippi (MS), Missouri (MO)

This article featured in the St. Louis Post Dispatch is an extract from Dr. King's address at Cornell College. Dr. King discusses three attitudes that can be taken toward the question of progress in race relations: extreme optimism, extreme pessimism and the realistic position.

Fisk News: The Montgomery Story

Thursday, July 12, 1956
Montgomery, AL, CHINA, INDIA, PAKISTAN, JAPAN

This publication of Fisk News features one of Dr. King's speeches on page five. The speech is entitled "The Montgomery Story," and was delivered at the 13th Annual Institute of Race Relations at Fisk University. Dr. King commences to share of Rosa Parks' refusal to move from her bus seat and help begin the historic Montgomery Bus Boycott. Blacks boycotted public transportation for 7 months in Montgomery, Alabama and achieved success in changing the city's discriminatory practices.

People in Action: Segregation And The Church

Saturday, February 2, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

In this New York Amsterdam News article of February 2, 1963, Dr. King mentions writer James Baldwin’s scathing indictment of the Christian Church and states that the Church has been complicit in the system of racial segregation or remained silent on racial injustice, the nation’s most urgent social ill. The church should be the headlight, he states, not the taillight and be true to the prophetic call for justice. King takes hope, however, having just attended the National Conference on Religion and Race in Chicago, which brought together Catholic, Protestant, and Jewish leaders.

Bold Design for a New South

Saturday, March 30, 1963
Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, Mississippi (MS), North Carolina (NC)

Dr. King notes that civil rights has been replaced as the "Number One" domestic issue, dwarfed by the Cuban missile crisis, trade legislation and tax reform. He attributes this to public acceptance of tokenism as well as an overly cautious administration. While acknowledging that the administration has made greater efforts on civil rights than previous ones, Dr. King says the progress is constricted and confined.

People In Action : "Birmingham Part 2"

Saturday, August 17, 1963
Mississippi (MS), Birmingham, AL, Albany, GA, New York (NY), Chattanooga, TN, Virginia (VA), Georgia (GA)

Dr. King, along with the SCLC, devises a plan to stop government officials from shutting down public facilities. Dr. King goes on to discuss the racism in Albany and plans to generate peace with the white communities.