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Pittsburgh Courier: Mays

Saturday, April 29, 1950
Pittsburgh, PA

Dr. Benjamin E. Mays mourns the recent deaths of Charles Drew and Carter Woodson. Both were highly acclaimed individuals, not only because of their race but also in their areas of study. Drew developed large-scale blood banks during WWI and Woodson cultivated the idea of Black History Month.

Cape Times: No Reply to Luther King Invitation

Tuesday, November 23, 1965
SOUTH AFRICA

L. Marquard writes an article discussing the discontent that Dr. J. D. Vorster and Rev. J. A. Heynes had regarding Dr. King's honorary degree from the Vrye Universiteit of Amsterdam.

King Plans Capital Shantytown 'In a Tumbledown Shack'

Washington, D.C., Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Mississippi (MS)

This article describes Dr. King's plans, as observed by a detractor, for the 1968 March of Poor People to Washington.  The Associated Press reports that shacks and poor people from all over the nation will descend on the nation's capital to make the nation aware of their presence. President Lyndon B. Johnson, when reached for comment, said he hoped to work with the groups.

Goldwater's Nomination

Tuesday, August 1, 1967
New York (NY)

Dr. King expresses his disdain for Republican presidential candidate Senator Barry Goldwater. Dr. King believes that Senator Goldwater is not an adequate candidate, due to his lack of knowledge in foreign policy and philosophies about equality for all.

"DuBois State Memorial Proposed; Would Be in Great Barrington"

Monday, February 12, 1968
New York (NY), Massachusetts (MA), Pennsylvania (PA)

William F. Bell writes an article concerning a proposed W. E. Dubois State Memorial in Great Barrington.

Integrating Elementary Schools in Berkeley

Thursday, April 20, 1967
Berkeley, CA, California (CA), New Jersey (NJ)

This article details the integration of several Berkeley area elementary schools. The Presidents of each school give feedback regarding the public's response and their plans on how they will proceed.

He Was a Moment in the Conscience of Man

Wednesday, April 10, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New York (NY)

This article discusses the importance of preserving Dr. King's teachings and legacy.

Shriver Turnabout on Poverty Project Criticized

Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), Chicago, IL, Cleveland, OH

William C. Selover writes this article covering the criticism around Sargent Shriver's decision to cut funding for the poverty relief program, Child Development Group of Mississippi. Shriver, Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity, had created Head Start programs and used the CDGM as a model for programs across the country. Several accusations are rendered as cause to the cut, including Shriver giving in to political pressure from segregationist senators of Mississippi. Many believe that once again poor people had "been sacrificed to political expediency."

A Country Called Corporate America

Sunday, July 3, 1966
New York (NY), California (CA), Illinois (IL), Pennsylvania (PA), Texas (TX), Ohio (OH)

New York Times Magazine writer Andrew Hacker writes about the growing problems caused by the "bigness" of corporate America. He says that large corporations are beginning to have so much power that they can damage the society without having to account for the consequences, as "corporate wealth buys corporate wishes." Some of the ways that they effect society are through their advertisements, their control of the labor market and education.

Negro Church Finest Hope for Christianity

Thursday, January 18, 1962
London, England, Pittsburgh, PA

Ruth Haefner forwards a publication from The Pittsburgh Courier which states, "the newly militant Negro theologians in America, may perform the miracle of raising the dead (Western Christendom) to life." She further expresses her hopes that Dr. King may do the work of reviving the Christian spirit with a weekly letter featured in London press.

Dr. King's Revealing Report On 'Summer of Discontent'

Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King's responses to the events in Birmingham, Alabama during the summer of 1963 are reported in this Chicago Sun-Times article.

Notes on a Letter from Birmingham Jail

Dr. King records notes on three different topics. First, he examines the concept of extremism and individual responses in their respective environments. Next, he expresses disappointment with the white church and its leadership. The final note describes the challenges and hardships of early Christians.

The Boycott Explained

Saturday, April 10, 1965
Alabama (AL)

Dr. King writes this article in the form of questions and answers to explain the purpose and impact of an upcoming boycott in Alabama.

MLK Debuts the Book of the Year

Wednesday, June 10, 1964
Montgomery, AL

This "Christian Century" ad debuts Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait."

Is It All Right To Break The Law?

Monday, August 12, 1963
New York (NY), Birmingham, AL, New York, NY, Alabama (AL)

Excerpts from Dr. King's 1963 "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" are used to establish an affirmative answer to the question, "Is It All Right to Break The Law?"

MLK - Out of the Night of Segregation

Saturday, February 1, 1958
Philadelphia, PA, Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

This essay by Dr. King is featured in the February 1958 edition of Lutheran Woman's Work. King focuses on nonviolence and segregation while critiquing the sociological impacts of oppression.

Man's Struggle for Freedom

Sunday, June 25, 1967
Chicago, IL, Montgomery, AL, Mississippi (MS), Selma, AL, Wisconsin (WI)

The "Chicago Tribune" reviews Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

The Dexter Echo: Not Guilty!

Wednesday, June 8, 1960
Montgomery, AL, Chicago, IL

This article states that Dr. King was found not guilty for tax evasion charges. The state's tax agent refused to lie under oath or allow prejudice to sway the facts.

The Man Who Was a Fool

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

The sermon "The Man Who Was a Fool," was published in the June 1961 issue of the journal The Pulpit. Dr. King delivered the sermon in both Chicago and Detroit in early 1961.

"Delaware Hears Nixon Fight Bias"

Friday, October 1, 1954
Delaware (DE), Washington, D.C., California (CA)

This New York Times article provides details about Vice President Richard Nixon's decision to support the end of school segregation.

Why We Can't Wait Book Review

Monday, June 22, 1964
Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL

This article highlights Dr. King's books "Why We Can't Wait" and "Stride Toward Freedom."

SCLC Newsletter: Of Riots and Wrongs Against Jews

Wednesday, July 1, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Florida (FL), St. Augustine, FL, Mississippi (MS)

This draft of an article for the July-August 1964 edition of the SCLC newsletter discusses recent riots in New York City and Rochester, New York. The riots are a disappointment not only because they deviate from the path of nonviolence, but also because the rioters looted many Jewish-owned businesses. The article closes by listing examples of Jews helping in the fight for racial equality in the United States.

Crisis and The Church

Montgomery, AL, Johannesburg, South Africa, South Africa, EGYPT, Jackson, MS

Dr. King emphasizes the important role of the Church in the midst of a global political and social shift. He explores in detail the steps necessary to implement changes through the Church and its' constituents.

Useful Work for the Rev. Martin Luther

Chicago, IL

This newspaper clipping contrasts Dr. King's view of the job discrimination to the report by Assistant Secretary of Commerce Andrew Brimmer. According to the article, Dr. King feels that little has been done to ameliorate job discrimination amongst blacks. Mr. Brimmer has an opposite view, which is reflected in his report.

JFK's Executive Order In Housing

Thursday, December 13, 1962

This document is a draft of an article, written by Dr. King, to be placed in the Amsterdam Newspaper. Dr. King breaks down the housing order signed into law by President Kennedy. He makes clear that housing discrimination is a large hurdle to ending segregation.

Organize Voter Registration in North

Georgia (GA), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King discusses the gap in black and white voters across the US,specifically in the North. King organizes speeches and a tour across Northern cities to get blacks registered to vote.

U.S. News & World Report: Negro Leaders Tell Their Plans for '64

Monday, February 24, 1964
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), New York, NY, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, MEXICO, CUBA, Georgia (GA), Kentucky (KY), Michigan (MI), Louisiana (LA), Atlanta, GA, Minnesota (MN), Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Missouri (MO), Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, Louisville, KY, North Carolina (NC), Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, Texas (TX), INDIA, Florida (FL), Tallahassee, FL, Detroit, MI, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, San Francisco, CA, Pittsburgh, PA, Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Virginia (VA), Montgomery, AL

Past, present and future efforts in the area of civil rights are discussed in interviews of five organizational leaders in the civil rights movement. These leaders are: Whitney M. Young, Jr. of the National Urban League, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. of the SCLC, Roy Wilkins of the NAACP, James L. Farmer of CORE, and James Forman of SNCC.

Negroes Are Not Moving Too Fast

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

In this article, Dr. King attempts to refute allegations that Negroes are moving too fast and expect special favors. He states, "the Negro is not going nearly fast enough."

New York Amsterdam News: White-On-White Darien's Open Door

Saturday, December 12, 1964
New York (NY), Connecticut (CT), New York, NY

In this editorial Ms. Gertrude Wilson highlights a teacher exchange program in an affluent White community. This particular program aims to enrich the lives of students by integrating a diverse representation of professionals.

People in Action: Segregation And The Church

Saturday, February 2, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

In this New York Amsterdam News article of February 2, 1963, Dr. King mentions writer James Baldwin’s scathing indictment of the Christian Church and states that the Church has been complicit in the system of racial segregation or remained silent on racial injustice, the nation’s most urgent social ill. The church should be the headlight, he states, not the taillight and be true to the prophetic call for justice. King takes hope, however, having just attended the National Conference on Religion and Race in Chicago, which brought together Catholic, Protestant, and Jewish leaders.