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"Articles"

"Question of Credibility"

Sunday, October 16, 1966
Mississippi (MS), New York (NY)

In this article, the author highlights and questions the credibility of The Child Development Group, which was created to assist in educating the youth of Mississippi.

How Urban League Helps City on Day-to-Day Basis

Friday, November 5, 1965
Chicago, IL

In this article, the council, activities, and contributions of the Urban League are discussed. Edwin C. Berry, the league's executive secretary, believes that contributions have decreased due to the league's refusal to take a stand against civil rights demonstrations. Mr. Berry is hopeful that contributors will return their support to make Chicago a "hallmark of democracy."

The Nation: Fumbling on the New Frontier by MLK

Saturday, March 3, 1962
Albany, GA, Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), INDIA, Alabama (AL), Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL

Dr. King elaborates on a report regarding civil rights and the collective efforts with the Kennedy Administration to eradicate racial discrimination. The Executive Orders from President Kennedy are unprecedented as he is attempting to eliminate employment discrimination and has appointed Negroes to key government positions. In an effort not to move "too fast," the President's legislative programs have now commenced a pace that is parallel with the consensus. Dr.

Delegation of 11 from Local 237 Walk in Mourning March

Memphis, TN, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This article explains the march that took place after Dr. King's assassination. Many people took part in the mourning march led by Coretta Scott King and Reverend Ralph Abernathy.

Look Magazine: Can Johnson Win His Other War?

Tuesday, June 13, 1967
Washington, D.C., Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Connecticut (CT), West Virginia (WV), Maryland (MD), Indiana (IN), New York (NY), Florida (FL), San Francisco, CA, California (CA), Denver, CO, Colorado (CO)

The Office of Economic Opportunity republished this spotlight on President Johnson's War on Poverty from Look Magazine in June 1967. The editors discuss the "poverty of opportunity" plaguing nearly 1 in every 6 Americans, saying that Johnson's War on Poverty makes an attempt to combat the economic conditions of America's most vulnerable, including Negro Americans. The articles also shed light on the numerous shortcomings the Johnson Administration-supported legislation has encountered amongst legislators and the American public.

People in Action: A Look To 1964

Saturday, January 4, 1964
Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA, Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King writes this article looking forward to the new year of 1964. He notes that all the activity and accomplishments in 1963 set the tone for what is to come in the following year. Though "the Negro as a community has increased his skills tremendously in quantity and quality," there is still much work to be done. King references the civil rights legislation that currently stands before Congress. Among other topics, he also states that there are efforts to broaden the power of the Negro consumer market.

Negroes See No Future for King as National Leader, Except in Politics

Thursday, August 10, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Los Angeles, CA, Cleveland, OH, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL)

Almena Lomax discusses the public opinions of African Americans on Dr. King being elected to a national office.

The Danger of A Little Progress

Monday, February 3, 1964
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

This focuses on the issue of short term progress within the Civil Rights Movement because it does not offer long term lasting solutions.

My Dream

Mississippi (MS), Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL), Tennessee (TN)

Dr. King writes an article entitled "My Dream," which discusses his campaign to "wage war on the big city ghetto." King visits several slums across the North, and expresses his sentiments regarding the infamous slum conditions.

Birmingham Jail

Tuesday, December 7, 1965
Birmingham, AL, Missouri (MO)

Reverend Robert J. Leuver sends Dr. King an article titled "Birmingham Jail.". In the article, Harry Cargas learns that there are some members of the police force who support the Civil Rights Movement, but are too fearful to speak out against the racial atrocities. It was here that Mr. Cargas realized the ongoing struggle for outspoken and silent supporters of the movement for social change.

The Boycott Explained

Saturday, April 10, 1965
Alabama (AL)

Dr. King writes this article in the form of questions and answers to explain the purpose and impact of an upcoming boycott in Alabama.

Memo from Tom Offenburger to MLK and Others Regarding Article

Monday, January 8, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Albany, GA, Birmingham, AL

Tom Offenburger sends Dr. King a copy of a newspaper clipping from the Atlanta Constitution in which the writer Bruce Galphin expresses his sentiments regarding the often violent occurrences at nonviolent protests.

Revolt Without Violence - The Negroes' New Strategy

Monday, March 21, 1960
North Carolina (NC), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Tallahassee, FL, Florida (FL), Nashville, TN, Tennessee (TN)

In this 1960 U.S. News & World Report article, Dr. King discusses the lunch counter sit-in movement spurring across the American South, the nonviolent approach to civil rights demonstrations, and the evolving status of the Negro.

Should F.E.P.C. Become a Federal Law?

In this draft article Dr. King discusses employment discrimination and the need for the Fair Employment Practices Commission to become legislation.

The Luminous Promise

Saturday, December 1, 1962

This draft of "The Luminous Promise," published in the December 1962 issue of The Progressive, marks the 100th celebration of the Emancipation Proclamation. In the article Dr. King writes, "there is but one way to commemorate the Emancipation Proclamation. That is to make its declaration of freedom real."

Shriver Outlines Summer Program

Saturday, March 4, 1967
New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Pennsylvania (PA), South Dakota (SD), Rhode Island (RI), North Dakota (ND)

This New York Times article reports that if Congress approves the $75 million supplemental appropriation for antipoverty programs, Sargent Shriver, director of the Office of Equal Employment Opportunity, plans to use $47 million for the Neighborhood Youth Corps and $25 for community action agencies to help provide youth with employment and recreation. It also mentions efforts in the Senate to increase the supplemental appropriation.

Speaking Out

New York, NY

Dr. King discusses the roles of Civil Rights leaders. He states that leaders do not control crime but have the responsibility of maintaining discipline. Dr. King reminds his audience that the Negro was the creator of nonviolence.

Albany Student Penalty Stressed

Georgia (GA)

Approximately 40 African American students were suspended from school and charged for participating in mob action. The students were suspended for taking part in an anti-segregation demonstration to Albany City Hall. The demonstration included White students as well but they were not punished for their actions. The 40 students planned to appeal their cases to the federal court.

New York Amsterdam News: White-On-White Darien's Open Door

Saturday, December 12, 1964
New York (NY), Connecticut (CT), New York, NY

In this editorial Ms. Gertrude Wilson highlights a teacher exchange program in an affluent White community. This particular program aims to enrich the lives of students by integrating a diverse representation of professionals.

People In Action: The School Boycott Concept

Saturday, April 11, 1964
Birmingham, AL, New York, NY

Dr. King expounds on the effectiveness of school boycotting to combat the issues of de facto segregation. Initially, Dr. King sought boycotting as a creative nonviolent approach to intolerable racial conditions, but he expresses some concern with children involvement in "adult issues" such as civil rights. However, Dr. King states children are affected and since they are the next generation, should partake in the improvement endeavors of the society. The article further details ideologies and methods surrounding the school boycotts.

Reading, Writing, and Race Relations

Thursday, June 1, 1967
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dorothy Singer wrote this piece,"Reading, Writing and Race Relations", regarding the racial integration in schools. Singer discusses several studies and their findings regarding integration.

Memo from the American Lutheran Church to Denver Area Pastors

Virginia (VA), Washington, D.C., Denver, CO

David Brown of the American Lutheran Church sends an article and copy of a letter from a pastor responding to the article to Denver area pastors. The article, published in "Common Sense," depicts Dr. King as a "Marxist tool" and agitator.

The Negro is the Most Glaring Evidence of White American's Hypocrisy

Dr. King shares the desire and need of American Negroes to have a social revolution for equality.

SCLC Newsletter: Of Riots and Wrongs Against Jews

Wednesday, July 1, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Florida (FL), St. Augustine, FL, Mississippi (MS)

This draft of an article for the July-August 1964 edition of the SCLC newsletter discusses recent riots in New York City and Rochester, New York. The riots are a disappointment not only because they deviate from the path of nonviolence, but also because the rioters looted many Jewish-owned businesses. The article closes by listing examples of Jews helping in the fight for racial equality in the United States.

The U.S. Negro, 1953

Monday, May 11, 1953
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington (WA), Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, New York, NY, New York (NY), CANADA, San Francisco, CA, ITALY, Detroit, MI, Delaware (DE), Louisville, KY, SOUTH KOREA, Washington, D.C., KENYA, Tennessee (TN)

This Time Magazine article discusses socioeconomic components for the Negro in 1953. Topics range from the Mason-Dixon Line and Cadillacs, to the difference between Southern and Northern Negroes.

Rutgers Professor Liberties Advocate

Thursday, August 18, 1966
New Jersey (NJ), New York (NY), Mississippi (MS)

Arthur Kinoy, a civil rights lawyer, was arrested in House Un-American Activities Committee hearings. During the few minutes he was in jail, Kinoy spent his time offering free advice to the other inmates.

The Nation: Hammer of Civil Rights

Monday, March 9, 1964
Birmingham, AL, Jackson, MS

This article by Dr. King appeared in the March 9, 1964, edition of The Nation. Dr. King discusses the impetus for the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Kennedy and Johnson Administrations' commitment to the cause. Recognizing the complexity of such a political movement, King lauds the President Johnson for fighting off attempts to weaken the bill. King also recognizes the achievements of the Fair Employment Committee, established by President Kennedy and headed by then-Vice President Johnson, in providing employment opportunities for many southern Negroes.

People in Action: Our New President

Saturday, February 1, 1964
New York (NY)

In this article in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King writes optimistically about the prospects for civil rights in the transition from President Kennedy to President Johnson. He believes that Johnson's Southern-ness may disarm the likes of George Wallace and that the President's proven commitment to civil rights and skills as Majority Leader in the Senate will aid in passing legislation.

WDIX: In Whose Interest Is Changing The Law?

Wednesday, March 20, 1968
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Orangeburg, SC

This editorial was broadcast on WDIX, a radio station based out of Orangeburg, South Carolina, on March 20, 1968. The piece questions if President Johnson's actions in favor of civil rights were under the pressure of Dr. King and Stokely Carmichael, stating that the Great Society is an danger. The author further argues that the status of African Americans as been largely improved, just "not as quickly" as they would have hoped and that should be good enough.

War and Pacifism

New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King examines War and Pacifism. He determines that absolute pacifism is not acceptable, but neither is war. He cites several different philosophies of pacifism and nonviolence set forth by such figures as Nels Ferre, John H. Hallowell, A. J. Muste and Mahatma Gandhi.