Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Articles"

Newspaper Clippings from New York and New Jersey

These newspaper clippings represent the views of several individuals who are critical of the Black Power Movement, the work ethics of African Americans and the government's policies.

People in Action: Most Abused Man in Nation

Saturday, March 31, 1962

This article by Dr. King, published in his "People in Action" series in the New York Amsterdam News, describes the national and local reaction to the Birmingham jailing of Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth and J. S. Phifer.

University of Mississippi at Oxford Crisis

Dr. King discusses the Mississippi crisis after the admittance of James Meredith into the local University.

"Outrage in Alabama"

Sunday, May 5, 1963

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference reprinted the article, "Outrage in Alabama," which was originally printed in The New York Times. The article describes violent acts against civil rights demonstrators discussing the flaws within the legal system.

S.C.L.C's Rev. Bevel Charges U.S. Gov't With Genocide

This article, details the work and beliefs of Reverend James L. Bevel, a Baptist minister and field representative of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Bevel claims that the United States Government is committing genocide against Negro people.

Powell's Court Suit Challenged by House Move

Saturday, April 1, 1967

Congressman Adam Clayton Powell, the first black Congressman from New York State, files a suit with the federal court to regain his congressional seat after being excluded from Congress due to "unauthorized travel at taxpayers' expense and payroll padding." This newspaper article briefly details Powell's suit and The House of Representatives' response to the charge. The case would eventually be heard by the Supreme Court in Powell vs. McCormack, leading to the Federal Contested Elections Act in 1969.

Credit

Saturday, September 1, 1962

This poem examines a man's earthly worth and finally his heavenly worth.

Notes on a Letter from Birmingham Jail

Dr. King records notes on three different topics. First, he examines the concept of extremism and individual responses in their respective environments. Next, he expresses disappointment with the white church and its leadership. The final note describes the challenges and hardships of early Christians.

The Burning Truth in the South

This article reprinted from "The Progressive," details the discriminatory conditions experienced by blacks in the South and urges support in the nonviolent struggle for freedom and equality.

Dr. King Plans '67 Pilgrimage to Holy Land

This newspaper clipping outlines plans for Dr. King's Pilgrimage to the Holy Land.

Alabama Council Newsletter

Amidst a battle between federal and states' rights, Reverend Hughes discusses the arrival of the Commission on Civil Rights and its intended purpose in the state of Alabama.

U.S. News and World Report: Is Insurrection Brewing in U.S.?

Monday, December 25, 1967

This article in the U.S. News and World Report features an interview with Richard H. Sanger, known for his experience in the United States Foreign Service and his abilities to recognize the patterns of political violence.

King Assails Westmoreland, Praises Clay

This article discusses Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War. Dr. King asserts that the US is on the wrong side of the war and denounces it during a speech at Ebenezer Baptist Church.

People In Action: Literacy Bill Dies

Saturday, May 26, 1962

Dr. King shares his disappointment with the Senate vote that stopped the 1962 Voting Rights Bill, then known as the Literacy Bill. The bill would have eliminated the literacy tests that Dr. King believed were used to keep African-Americans of all education levels from qualifying to vote.

Shriver Outlines Summer Program

Saturday, March 4, 1967

This New York Times article reports that if Congress approves the $75 million supplemental appropriation for antipoverty programs, Sargent Shriver, director of the Office of Equal Employment Opportunity, plans to use $47 million for the Neighborhood Youth Corps and $25 for community action agencies to help provide youth with employment and recreation. It also mentions efforts in the Senate to increase the supplemental appropriation.

Tampa Tribune: MLK – A Religious Prophet

Saturday, November 7, 1964

In a letter to the editor, Rev. Gordon Christensen responds to The Tribune’s editorial “Peace Prize Puzzle,” saying the problem can be solved from both the secular and religious perspectives. King’s nonviolent resistance to segregation supports national law as laid out in the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Supreme Court decisions. The effort to gain freedom for Negroes through nonviolence offers the world an alternative to Communism as a means of ending colonialism.

Out of the Long Night of Segregation

Friday, February 28, 1958

In this article, "Out of the Long Night of Segregation", Dr. King discusses the result of Negroes waiting to be treated as equals to no avail. He also presents several actions that should take place to provoke change.

Long Beach Dispatch: American Talking Back

In this letter to the editor, Mr. Joseph Holmes uses rhetorical questions and graphic imagery to illustrate respective positions on the Vietnam War.

Darien Seeking Negro Teachers

Thursday, November 26, 1964

This article discusses the teacher exchange program between New York City Public Schools and Darien, Connecticut. The program calls for African American teachers to teach students in the predominately white town. The superintendent states the purpose of the project is to show the students that African Americans, if given the same opportunity, are just as intelligent as their white counterparts.

A Look to 1964

This is a draft of the article "A Look to 1964" written by Dr. King. Published on January 1, 1964 in the New York Amsterdam News. In the article, Dr. King addresses the strides the African American people have taken towards the struggle for equality.

Clergymen Set Negro Market Wholesaler

Monday, February 7, 1966

This article explains how "three clergymen have organized a wholesale tour service which will cater to the Negro travel market." The service was called "Concreta Tour Service" and it took tourists abroad, focusing on many cities with religious significance.

The Martin Luther King Column

Dr. King discusses the hardwork and efforts of Daisy Bates and her husband Lucius on behalf of the civil rights movement.

Dr. Spock Joins King in March

Pediatrician and anti-war activist Dr. Benjamin Spock and Dr. King lead thousands of individuals throughout the streets of Chicago in objection to the Vietnam War. Both Dr. King and Dr. Spock express their dissatisfaction with President Johnson's focus on Vietnam rather than the war on poverty.

Six Lessons from Red China

Wednesday, August 1, 1951

The author discusses six lessons that readers can learn from Communist China concerning America and the church. The first lesson being on corruption, if uncontrolled, leads to tyranny. The second and third lessons focus on change. The forces in the world during that time (namely Communism) and the methods they used exceeded what people thought was possible in history.

Black Power: Two Views

Saturday, October 1, 1966

James Peck, a white civil rights activist, writes an article concerning the path of the Civil Rights Movement. He is beginning to notice that black power and black racism are taking over organizations that had been focused on nonviolence and racial equality.

Operation Breadbasket Food Store Agreement

Economic conditions begin to change as High-Low Foods and the ministers of Operation Breadbasket team up to provide better opportunities for African Americans.

The Emergency Civil Liberties Committee Defends the Constitutional Rights

Friday, February 16, 1968

ECLC writes to ask for assistance with their efforts to criminalize governmental draft tactics. As staunch supporters of the Bill of Rights and the Constitution, ECLC argues that the Draft is a violation of citizen's constitutional rights. Furthermore, they have dedicated their services to protecting the rights of youth, arguing that the draft is economically discriminatory in "student deferments". The organization challenges other civil liberties organizations to join them in this fight.

The Man Who Was a Fool

The sermon "The Man Who Was a Fool," was published in the June 1961 issue of the journal The Pulpit. Dr. King delivered the sermon in both Chicago and Detroit in early 1961.

Diary in Jail

Thursday, August 23, 1962

Dr. King wrote a personal diary of his day-to-day experiences while in an Albany, Georgia jail for attempting to pray in front of City Hall. He pledged to return to jail, if necessary, if the City Commission refused to negotiate with Negro leaders on demands for immediate desegregation of all public facilities.

"Meaning of Georgia Elections"

Saturday, July 3, 1965

Dr. King speaks about the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's Summer Community Organization and Political Education Project (SCOPE). He also talks about the political advancements that were made in the south.