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People In Action: The Role of the Church

Dr. King discusses the issues of segregation and the role of the church in rectifying the situation.

Birmingham Manifesto

Birmingham, AL

This manifesto details the methods, accomplishments, failures and reasons for the use and postponement of direct action tactics in Birmingham, Alabama.

How Urban League Helps City on Day-to-Day Basis

Friday, November 5, 1965
Chicago, IL

In this article, the council, activities, and contributions of the Urban League are discussed. Edwin C. Berry, the league's executive secretary, believes that contributions have decreased due to the league's refusal to take a stand against civil rights demonstrations. Mr. Berry is hopeful that contributors will return their support to make Chicago a "hallmark of democracy."

Information Regarding the Baha'i Faith


This excerpt on the Baha'i Faith claims that America is to be a leader in bringing world peace. The Baha'i faith has spread worldwide and promotes all religions as having a common golden rule.

To the Negroes of America


Robert Welch compares the American Negro Population to Negro populations around the world in regards to ownership of various consumer items. He asserts that Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, Bayard Rustin and Walter Reuther are shameless liars working in league with communists.

"Attorney's Arrest is Protested"

Thursday, August 18, 1966
Washington, D.C., Texas (TX), New York (NY), San Francisco, CA

This Washington Post article, entitled "Attorney's Arrest is Protested", talks about Arthur Kinoy's arrest and the complications that aroused as a result of it.

MLK to Confer in June to Plan Summer Drive Here

Monday, May 29, 1967
Cleveland, OH, Louisville, KY

Referencing Dr. King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Bob Modic wrote about an upcoming meeting in Cleveland, Ohio. This meeting was in preparation for the implementation of a campaign to increase employment and housing opportunities for the city's African Americans.

Dr. Spock Joins King in March


Pediatrician and anti-war activist Dr. Benjamin Spock and Dr. King lead thousands of individuals throughout the streets of Chicago in objection to the Vietnam War. Both Dr. King and Dr. Spock express their dissatisfaction with President Johnson's focus on Vietnam rather than the war on poverty.

Intervention Anyone? A New Look at Social Action

Montgomery, AL, Albany, GA

Dr. Hans B. C. Spiegel wrote this piece to describe the different components of social action. Dr. Spiegel, the Director of the Center for Community Tensions at Springfield College, uses the Montgomery and Albany Movements as examples of various levels of social intervention. He also references the SCLC, the Fair Employment Practices Commission, and the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity.

Tampa Tribune: MLK – A Religious Prophet

Saturday, November 7, 1964
Florida (FL)

In a letter to the editor, Rev. Gordon Christensen responds to The Tribune’s editorial “Peace Prize Puzzle,” saying the problem can be solved from both the secular and religious perspectives. King’s nonviolent resistance to segregation supports national law as laid out in the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Supreme Court decisions. The effort to gain freedom for Negroes through nonviolence offers the world an alternative to Communism as a means of ending colonialism.

Powell's Court Suit Challenged by House Move

Saturday, April 1, 1967
Florida (FL), Massachusetts (MA), Washington, D.C.

Congressman Adam Clayton Powell, the first black Congressman from New York State, files a suit with the federal court to regain his congressional seat after being excluded from Congress due to "unauthorized travel at taxpayers' expense and payroll padding." This newspaper article briefly details Powell's suit and The House of Representatives' response to the charge. The case would eventually be heard by the Supreme Court in Powell vs. McCormack, leading to the Federal Contested Elections Act in 1969.

Draft: The Time for Freedom Has Come

Tuesday, May 1, 1962

In this draft of Dr. King's article, "The Time for Freedom Has Come," he discusses the role of African American students in the Civil Rights Movement. He praises the commitment and determination of students and credits them with the desegregation of lunch counters. He also identifies with the students' frustration with the slowness of forward progress in the struggle for equality. The article was published in New York Times Magazine on September 10, 1961.

Memo from Tom Offenburger to MLK and Others Regarding Article

Monday, January 8, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Albany, GA, Birmingham, AL

Tom Offenburger sends Dr. King a copy of a newspaper clipping from the Atlanta Constitution in which the writer Bruce Galphin expresses his sentiments regarding the often violent occurrences at nonviolent protests.

Political Cartoon: The FBI Adds


This satirical cartoon in the Nashville Banner equates protests in the U.S. with the Communist buildup in Vietnam.

"Mrs. Julia Brown To Speak Here On Martin Luther King"

Sunday, March 17, 1968
Virginia (VA)

This article discusses former FBI undercover agent, Julia Brown's plan to expose Dr. King of his affiliation with the Communist party.

Political Cartoon: Nourishing the Enemy

Thursday, April 20, 1967
Tennessee (TN), Nashville, TN, VIETNAM

This political cartoon satirizes various elements of antiwar protesters regarding Vietnam. The inference is that events and positions originating from those elements are in essence aid and comfort to the enemy. "King Speeches" is prominently displayed.

Pueblo Poll: "King's Vietnam Opinion Lacks Majority Support"

Sunday, May 7, 1967
Colorado (CO)

This article contains opinions from various residents of Pueblo, CO, concerning Dr. King's position on the Vietnam War.

Revolution in the Delta: Farm Hands Go on Strike

Mississippi (MS)

David R. Underhill discusses the strike of farm laborers in various Mississippi Delta cities. Underhill highlights strike procedures, methods, and locations.

Chicago Daily Defender: SCLC Aide Makes Spirited Capital March Call Here

Monday, February 5, 1968
Chicago Theological Seminary, S.C.L.C. Operation Breadbasket, United States White House, Poor People's Campaign, Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, FRANCE

The Chicago Daily Defender published this article about Rev. Ralph Abernathy's visit to Chicago to promote the Poor People's Campaign. According to Abernathy, "Come this summer, thousands of poor Americans are going to take their burdens to the White House and they'll leave them with LBJ."

Bold Design for a New South

Saturday, March 30, 1963
Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, Mississippi (MS), North Carolina (NC)

Dr. King notes that civil rights has been replaced as the "Number One" domestic issue, dwarfed by the Cuban missile crisis, trade legislation and tax reform. He attributes this to public acceptance of tokenism as well as an overly cautious administration. While acknowledging that the administration has made greater efforts on civil rights than previous ones, Dr. King says the progress is constricted and confined.

Darien Integration

Friday, April 17, 1964
Connecticut (CT)

This article is a summary of the integration of the Negro population into high-income residential suburbs. The Superintendent of schools and the Darien Board of Education has created a program to exchange schoolteachers and encourage students to attend schools with integrated classes.

Newspaper Article on MLK

Sunday, August 9, 1964
Florida (FL)

In this article from the Miami Florida Herald, the writer summarizes a portion of the book "Why We Can't Wait", written by Dr. King.

Chicago Tribune: Man's Struggle for Freedom

Sunday, June 25, 1967
Illinois (IL)

Clarence Seidenspinner writes this review for the Chicago Tribune regarding Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" His evaluation centers around Dr. King's progression from using nonviolence as strategy in Montgomery, to his focus on international affairs. He further explains Dr. King's first uneasy experience with the Black Power slogan and its effects.

The Negro Speaks

New York (NY), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Several prominent African Americans describe the issues that plague the black community. Some of these issues include poverty, segregation, civil rights and race relations.

The Strength of the Legacy

Sunday, November 22, 1964
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Mississippi (MS), Florida (FL)

In this New York Herald Tribune article, Dr. King refers to the recent 1964 Presidential election as a decisive repudiation of segregation and extremism. He claims the election results honored the memory of President John F. Kennedy, assassinated a year earlier. Kennedy’s greatest contribution to human rights, King says, was his televised appeal to the American people on June 19, 1963 describing equal rights and equal opportunity as a moral issue as old as the scriptures and as clear as the Constitution.

SCLC News Release on Voter Registration

Monday, February 19, 1962
Atlanta, GA, PUERTO RICO, Mississippi (MS)

This press release from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference describes Dr. King's prediction that many African-Americans would register to vote in the upcoming election. Dr. King also remarks that President Kennedy "has not lived up to his civil rights campaign promises."

The West Indies Laymen Nation Christian League on Communism


The article addresses the issue of Communism within the Caribbean and the need to stop its spread throughout the islands. The article stresses the importance of spreading the message of Christianity so that Communist thought can be laid to rest.

Integrating Elementary Schools in Berkeley

Thursday, April 20, 1967
Berkeley, CA, California (CA), New Jersey (NJ)

This article details the integration of several Berkeley area elementary schools. The Presidents of each school give feedback regarding the public's response and their plans on how they will proceed.

People In Action: The School Boycott Concept

Saturday, April 11, 1964
Birmingham, AL, New York, NY

Dr. King expounds on the effectiveness of school boycotting to combat the issues of de facto segregation. Initially, Dr. King sought boycotting as a creative nonviolent approach to intolerable racial conditions, but he expresses some concern with children involvement in "adult issues" such as civil rights. However, Dr. King states children are affected and since they are the next generation, should partake in the improvement endeavors of the society. The article further details ideologies and methods surrounding the school boycotts.

A Big Johnny Reb Special Editorial

Sunday, April 9, 1967

The Big Johnny Reb Radio Show, a show syndicated throughout the State of Georgia, criticizes Dr. King for his position on the Vietnam War. The management of the radio station agrees with the view that too much American blood has been spilled, but they also state Dr. King should not denounce his own country's cause in the fight against Communism.