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The Irish Echo: Ann Daly's Corner

Saturday, June 15, 1963

Ann Daly, a writer for the Irish Echo newspaper, reviews Dr. King's "Strength to Love" and recommends that her readers get a copy of it. She notes that the Irish community should be sympathetic to the plight of Negroes in Alabama because their Irish ancestors also endured oppression. She also gives her opinion on a Gaelic society publication, a book for teenage boys, and recent Irish cultural events.

The Denver Post Reprint "Boy, 13, Ashamed of Shaby Clothes"

Thursday, January 25, 1962

In this reprint, of the Denver Post article, entitled "Boy, 13, Ashamed of Shabby Clothes", the reader learns that a 13 year old boy did not go to school because he was ashamed by his clothes. The Colorado judge responded with an attempt to get the boy new clothes and reinstated in school.

Star: "An Analysis of Black Power" 1967

Monday, June 26, 1967

Paul Hathaway, of the Washington, D.C. Star newspaper, crafted a review of Dr. King's final publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" This extensive review of Dr. King's book focused, primarily, on his stance regarding the black power movement. According, to Dr. King, in the book, black power was something that was needed to achieve tangible goals such as: economic and political power. However, the use of the slogan carried a very volatile meaning that would alienate many allies in the movement, not of African American descent.

WRAL- TV Broadcast Transcript of Viewpoint show

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

WRAL-TV Viewpoint #1790 is a critical review of the efforts of Stokely Carmichael and Dr. King. The speaker claims Dr. King uses the threat of riots in cities to blackmail the United States Congress into doing the bidding of the Black Power Movement.

The New York Times: Books of The Times Storm Warnings

Wednesday, July 12, 1967

Eliot Fremont-Smith examines Dr. King's stance on the term of Black Power, his views on political power for Negroes and his focus on nonviolence.

Is Dr. King Used as Soviet Decoy?

This article discusses Dr. King's forthcoming visit to Russia to speak with representatives from the US and North and South Vietnam. Dr. King seeks to assist in ending the war in Vietnam; however, onlookers do not think his actions will lead to positive results.

Letter From Birmingham City Jail

Wednesday, May 1, 1963

Dr. King's famous "Letter from Birmingham Jail" is a response to a statement written by several Alabama Clergymen. In that statement, the Clergymen assert that Dr. King's methods are both "unwise and untimely." They brand him an "outside agitator" who should not be advocating the breaking of the law. Dr. King responds with this Letter and politely references Biblical, Classical and early American figures to counter the arguments of the Clergymen.

The Klansman Article Regarding MLK

This article on Dr. King appears in "The Klansman," a publication of the White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan of Mississippi. Dr. King, who is here referred to as the "Reverend Riot Inciter" and "Riot King," is alleged to have caused civil unrest in Leflore County and Greenwood, Mississippi.

Article regarding MLK

This article highlights Dr. Kings affiliation with the "New Left" Conference held in Chicago, Illinois.

MLK Debuts the Book of the Year

Wednesday, June 10, 1964

This "Christian Century" ad debuts Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait."

The Martin Luther King Column (1)

Dr. King discusses the accomplishments of the Montgomery bus boycott, the challenges Negros will face, and the leadership skills of Ralph Abernathy.

"Barnett Says JFK Aids Reds"

Saturday, July 13, 1963

In a testimony before the Senate Commerce Committee, Mississippi Governor Ross R. Barnett expresses his staunch opposition to President Kennedy's recent civil rights legislation. Governor Barnett goes as far as to associate recent Communist Party activities to the recent "racial agitation, strife, and conflict" emerging from the Civil Rights Movement.

Brutality in Mississippi

This document contains two articles that reference CORE worker Scott B. Smith. Disclosing accounts of Smith's experiences in Mississippi, the articles emphasize racially charged brutality as a common occurrence.

"Race Hate and Divisiveness"

This newspaper clipping depicts Dr. King's decision to move the civil rights movement up north as "one of grave peril to everyone concerned." The author believes that the defiance of the law could cause disaster for the Negro cause.

The Luminous Promise

Saturday, December 1, 1962

This draft of "The Luminous Promise," published in the December 1962 issue of The Progressive, marks the 100th celebration of the Emancipation Proclamation. In the article Dr. King writes, "there is but one way to commemorate the Emancipation Proclamation. That is to make its declaration of freedom real."

The Jackie Robinson Saga

This brief biographical sketch highlights Jackie Robinson's life and his accomplishments as a baseball player, Army Lieutenant and business executive.

New York Post: A Poor Show

Thursday, October 27, 1966

The Child Development Group in Mississippi (CDGM) was a head start project created in 1965 with the help of a federally funded grant. The program not only specialized in child development, but sought to increase community involvement. In late 1966, Mississippi Senator Stennis "opened fire" on the program, charging those involved with malpractice. Consequently, Sargent Shiver, Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity, formed a "more respectable anti-poverty unity" called Mississippi Action for Progress to takeover CDGM.

My Dream

Dr. King writes an article entitled "My Dream," which discusses his campaign to "wage war on the big city ghetto." King visits several slums across the North, and expresses his sentiments regarding the infamous slum conditions.

"Dr. King Outdated"

Saturday, July 15, 1967

This editorial reviews Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" Under the heading "Dr. King Outdated." The review expresses Mr. Bob Smith's disagreement with many themes of the book.

New York Times Graphic: Minority Problems in White Collar Employment

Sunday, January 21, 1968

This graphic from The New York Times shows examples of demographic inequality in white collar jobs.

The Plain Dealer: Dr. King Here Today to Gauge Tensions

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

This article, printed in "The Plain Dealer," provides a brief history of Dr. King and details the plans he had for Cleveland, OH.

Why Negroes Are Still Angry

Friday, July 1, 1966

American journalist Victor Bernstein details for Redbook why Negroes are still angry in the face of the apparent success of the Civil Rights Movement. He points out that the Movement has enabled many whites to see that integration and equal rights are right, but still knowingly choose to behave as if they are wrong.

SCLC Tour of Northern Cities

Dr. King announces an SCLC tour of Chicago, Cleveland, Philadelphia and Washington, DC. He cites the wish to establish communication with people in the black ghettos of northern cities and to assist local leadership in taking movement issues into their communities. He mentions the moral and material support provided by northern allies for the southern struggle and a time to reciprocate.

Chicago Daily News: Operation Breadbasket

Monday, August 8, 1966

The Chicago Daily News posts an article highlighting Operation Breadbaskets success in opening up two hundred and twenty four jobs in Chicago's dairy industry for Negroes.

The Spirit of Kinloch

The Spirit of Kinloch is a community newspaper with various articles. Kinloch is the oldest African American community to be incorporated in the state of Missouri.

Press Release and Interview from Radio Norway

Wednesday, December 9, 1964

Dr. King addresses the press the day before receiving the Nobel Peace Prize in a statement from Radio Norway.

Huge Crowd Hears King Speak

Friday, November 4, 1966

The University of Pittsburgh's campus newspaper, "The Pitt News," reports that Dr. King's speech drew a larger crowd than "John Kennedy, Theodore Sorenson or Herbert Aptheker when these men spoke at the University." Dr. King answers questions about issues such as Vietnam, Black Power, white backlash and Negro anti-Semitism. He also discussed the importance of an anti-poverty effort, particularly when examining what is spent on the war in Vietnam and the nation's space program.

SCLC Newsletter: January 1964

This SCLC Newsletter highlights Dr. King's honor as 'Man of Year' and discusses some of the major work he has done for blacks and the Civil Rights Movement.

Americans Need Some Discipline

This Daily Californian editorial calls for "self-restraint" in civil rights demonstrations and a return to the "hard work, thrift, and adherence to the moral precepts that form the basis for this democracy." It continues to maintain that gratuitous demonstrations cause racial riots and violence, provoking the "wrath of whites who resent Negro intrusion in their neighborhoods" and thus undermine political support for Dr. King's cause. Dr.

Shriver Turnabout on Poverty Project Criticized

William C. Selover writes this article covering the criticism around Sargent Shriver's decision to cut funding for the poverty relief program, Child Development Group of Mississippi. Shriver, Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity, had created Head Start programs and used the CDGM as a model for programs across the country. Several accusations are rendered as cause to the cut, including Shriver giving in to political pressure from segregationist senators of Mississippi. Many believe that once again poor people had "been sacrificed to political expediency."