Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Articles"

News Release Regarding Birmingham Shooting at Liberty Supermarket

Tuesday, February 22, 1966

This SCLC press release was issued in the wake of a violent episode in Birmingham, Alabama on February 21, 1966. That night, 23 year old Emory W. McGowen drove his car into a group of protesters before opening fire on the crowd wounding five people. The protest, called by Hosea L. Williams, was against Liberty Supermarket, a business being targeted for employment discrimination. The release contains information regarding the incident and includes pertinent quotes from Dr. King, Mr. Williams, and local minister and witness Rev. Wood.

Newspaper Clippings from New York and New Jersey

These newspaper clippings represent the views of several individuals who are critical of the Black Power Movement, the work ethics of African Americans and the government's policies.

Out of Segregation's Long Night

Dr. King addresses the crisis of race relations in America by asserting that there would not be a crisis if blacks accepted inferiority and injustice. He also discusses the physical and spiritual harm that segregation and slavery has caused for blacks and the effect that violence has on the community. Dr. King closes with remarks regarding nonviolence and what it truly represents.

Soap, Brush Help

Addressing Chicago slums, the focal point of Dr. King's Chicago crusade, the writer of the article calls for all tenants, regardless of race, creed or color, to assume some responsibility for the upkeep of their buildings instead of expecting Dr. King and the landlords of the buildings to solve the issue for them.

Cape Times: No Reply to Luther King Invitation

Tuesday, November 23, 1965

L. Marquard writes an article discussing the discontent that Dr. J. D. Vorster and Rev. J. A. Heynes had regarding Dr. King's honorary degree from the Vrye Universiteit of Amsterdam.

Non-Violence Takes Courage: King's Wife

Friday, March 29, 1968

Mrs. Coretta Scott King elaborates on her commitment to nonviolence, referring to it as "the best instrument of change," throughout her involvement in the Civil Rights and Peace Movements.

Out of the Long Night of Segregation

Saturday, February 1, 1958

Missions Magazine published various articles concerning the baptist ministry and how the church is impacting its surrounding community. Dr. King contributed to the magazine by writing an article entitled "Out of the Long Night of Segregation." In the article, he writes about the nonviolent methods being used to end segregation in America.

Article regarding MLK

This article highlights Dr. Kings affiliation with the "New Left" Conference held in Chicago, Illinois.

People in Action: Most Abused Man in Nation

Saturday, March 31, 1962

This article by Dr. King, published in his "People in Action" series in the New York Amsterdam News, describes the national and local reaction to the Birmingham jailing of Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth and J. S. Phifer.

Redbook: The Police

Wednesday, February 1, 1967

In this article from Redbook magazine, Sam Blum informs readers that policemen are not only "crime fighters" but also are expected to be skilled in numerous other areas as well. He exposes the FBI's often inaccurate assessment of the cost of crime and states that this is an effort to keep the public in fear and generate increased funding. Blum discusses the different experiences of the middle class and slum-dwellers, the perception of police brutality, and the need for professionalized training.

University of Mississippi at Oxford Crisis

Dr. King discusses the Mississippi crisis after the admittance of James Meredith into the local University.

People to People: The Law is Majestic

Saturday, July 31, 1965

Dr. King pays homage to the numerous lawyers of the Civil Rights Movement and asserts that the one unifying belief among lawyers is the idea that "law is majestic and the judicial process is supreme." Dr. King supports this claim with a story about his Negro lawyers successfully winning a case in Birmingham with an all-white jury.

Chicago IL The New Crusader: "The World of Books"

Saturday, June 24, 1967

Under the heading "The World of Books", the New Crusader newspaper published this review of Dr. King's last book. The review touches on Dr. King's examination of the Black Power movement and its effect on racial tension in America.

People in Action: Albany Justice

Dr. King discusses numerous injustices in Albany, a pacifist movement to Cuba, and police brutality against Negroes.

Memo from Tom Offenburger to MLK and Others Regarding Article

Monday, January 8, 1968

Tom Offenburger sends Dr. King a copy of a newspaper clipping from the Atlanta Constitution in which the writer Bruce Galphin expresses his sentiments regarding the often violent occurrences at nonviolent protests.

Newspaper Article about MLK

Saturday, August 21, 1965

In this article, Horace Sheffield responds to speculation that Dr. King will hold a "Summer Crusade" in Detroit.

U.S. Reds Fan Racist Flames To Stir Vietnam War Protest

William F. Buckley, a conservative columnist, decries the involvement of Negro leaders such as Dr. King and Stokely Carmichael n a recent Vietnam War protest. He compares Carmichael with members of the Ku Klux Klan, and he also alleges Communist involvement with the protest.

Letter From Birmingham City Jail

Wednesday, May 1, 1963

Dr. King's famous "Letter from Birmingham Jail" is a response to a statement written by several Alabama Clergymen. In that statement, the Clergymen assert that Dr. King's methods are both "unwise and untimely." They brand him an "outside agitator" who should not be advocating the breaking of the law. Dr. King responds with this Letter and politely references Biblical, Classical and early American figures to counter the arguments of the Clergymen.

Ebony: Advice For Living

Thursday, May 1, 1958

Dr. King answers readers' questions regarding family dynamics, the NAACP, outer versus inner beauty and the image of Negroes in literature and the media. He advocates for open communication and pleasant attitudes in familial relationships, and he offers hope that the portrayal of Negroes in movies and "other public channels" is improving.

SCLC Pamphlet of Articles in Rebuttal of MLK's Critics

Andrew Young, the National Executive Director of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, issued this pamphlet entitled "Does Martin Luther King, Jr. Have the Right? The Qualifications? The Duty? To Speak Out on Peace?" The pamphlet features several editorials written in defense of Dr. King that were published in the New York Times, Detroit Free Press, New York Post, and the Nation in April 1967. The pamphlet includes a statement saying the SCLC's primary focus is civil rights but they support Dr. King's right to speak his opinion regarding the Vietnam War.

People In Action: March on Washington

Saturday, August 24, 1968

Dr. King wrote this article for the New York Amsterdam news in anticipation of the March On Washington. He hoped it would be a nonviolent "orderly massing of people." He discusses past meetings and rallies that suffered from low participation due to fear of association with the protest movement. Dr. King encourages supporters to be courageous enough to attend this march.

My Trip to the Land of Gandhi

Dr. King documents his travel throughout India beginning in February 1959 with his wife and Dr. Lawrence Reddick. During his stay Dr. King reflects on the manifestation of Gandhi's nonviolent teachings in low crime rates amidst the impoverished living conditions. Dr. King also addresses the notion of a "divided India," a country deliberating the varying effects of Western modernization.

Newspaper Article Concerning Race Riot at Northwestern University

The author of this article gives an account of a race riot that occurred during a basketball game at Northwestern University.

"Are We Ready"

This column by Joseph D. Bibb makes the argument that not only is "the colored American" ready for his civil rights, but also it is hypocritical to deny him those rights given the ignorance and savagery of many of his white counterparts.

Schools' Mobile TV Unit Tapes Dr. King's Speech

Tuesday, December 1, 1964

This news article highlights Darien, Connecticut for the use of their mobile television unit to tape Dr. King's speech. The mobile studio was moved to Stamford High School, where students filmed the speech. Ten other schools in the area were able to see Dr. King speak with the help of this new technology.

King Plans Capital Shantytown 'In a Tumbledown Shack'

This article describes Dr. King's plans, as observed by a detractor, for the 1968 March of Poor People to Washington.  The Associated Press reports that shacks and poor people from all over the nation will descend on the nation's capital to make the nation aware of their presence. President Lyndon B. Johnson, when reached for comment, said he hoped to work with the groups.

Great Man

Gene Lyle writes the editor of a newspaper article entitled "Americans Need Some Discipline" to address unjustified criticism expressed against Dr. King. The author is certain that the article persuaded some readers that Dr. King "is to be feared and despised" for being a contributor to civil unrest. However, the writer predicts that "Dr. King will enter American history...as one of the great men of all time."

New South: The Current Crisis In Race Relations

Saturday, March 1, 1958

Dr. King, as President of the Montgomery Improvement Association, examines the race relations crisis. He discusses how segregation makes the Negro feel inferior and unaccepted. Dr. King also affirms that he will not accept a system of violence and the "evils of segregation."

The Sword That Heals

Dr. King, in this article adapted from his book "Why We Can't Wait," evaluates the intimidation the Negro faces as a result of securing freedom. He uses the campaigns in Birmingham, Albany, and Montgomery as backdrops to depict how the use of nonviolent direct action causes unrelenting sacrifice in the face of grave danger. This article was published in this quarterly summer 1964 issue of "The Critic."

President Kennedy's Record

Friday, February 9, 1962

In this February 1962 column for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King acknowledges President Kennedy's appointment of Negroes and executive order ending employment discrimination. But he calls the President “cautious and defensive” in providing strong leadership in civil rights and criticizes him for not ordering an end to discrimination in federally-assisted housing.