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King's Viet Stand Has Cost Him Some Financial Support

The Associated Press releases this article acknowledging the lack of funding forwarded to the SCLC because of Dr. King's views on Vietnam. The article also discusses how various other civil rights organizations have received more contributions based on the financial support drawn away from Dr. King. However, the article notes that Dr. King emphasizes the imperative link between the civil rights and peace movements.

Negro Morality and Why Didnt She Stay Home?

Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, recommends two articles published in The Carolina Israelite. "Negro Morality" makes distinctions between crime committed by impoverished Negroes and their ethically challenged white counterparts. The second article,"Why Didn't She Stay Home?" discusses tactics of the "Far Right," the ignoring of crimes committed against Negroes, and the role of both white and black clergy in the preservation of Christian ideals.

Tampa Tribune: MLK – A Religious Prophet

Saturday, November 7, 1964

In a letter to the editor, Rev. Gordon Christensen responds to The Tribune’s editorial “Peace Prize Puzzle,” saying the problem can be solved from both the secular and religious perspectives. King’s nonviolent resistance to segregation supports national law as laid out in the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Supreme Court decisions. The effort to gain freedom for Negroes through nonviolence offers the world an alternative to Communism as a means of ending colonialism.

Along This Way: The Violence of Poverty

Saturday, January 1, 1966

In his regular column of the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King discusses the rate of unemployment among Negroes. He states that 2/3 of all Negro families live in poverty. Dr. King argues that the administration needs to carry out the mandate of the Unemployment Act of 1945 and stimulate employment.

MLK Explains Nonviolent Resistance

Dr. King explores the underpinnings of nonviolent resistance by analyzing Thoreau's "On Civil Disobedience," the teachings of Gandhi and the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

Article Written by MLK for The Progressive

In this unfinished draft of an article for The Progressive, Dr. King writes about the social ills of America through the context of what he calls the two most important documents in American history: the Declaration of Independence and the Emancipation Proclamation.

Letter From Birmingham City Jail

Wednesday, May 1, 1963

Dr. King's famous "Letter from Birmingham Jail" is a response to a statement written by several Alabama Clergymen. In that statement, the Clergymen assert that Dr. King's methods are both "unwise and untimely." They brand him an "outside agitator" who should not be advocating the breaking of the law. Dr. King responds with this Letter and politely references Biblical, Classical and early American figures to counter the arguments of the Clergymen.

More and Faster

Sunday, January 5, 1964

Dr. King writes on the topic of "The Negro Goal: More and Faster." King highlights the black political and social climate in 1964 and discusses how the act of nonviolence gave blacks hope.

SCLC Newsletter: Of Riots and Wrongs Against Jews

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

This draft of an article for the July-August 1964 edition of the SCLC newsletter discusses recent riots in New York City and Rochester, New York. The riots are a disappointment not only because they deviate from the path of nonviolence, but also because the rioters looted many Jewish-owned businesses. The article closes by listing examples of Jews helping in the fight for racial equality in the United States.

The New York Times: New Way Sought to Teach Rights

Sunday, February 20, 1966

Columbia University and its Teachers College plan to begin a nationwide initiative to improve the teaching of civil rights. The plan will not only apply to elementary and secondary schools but also to college, universities and adult education forums. Instead of using textbooks, teachers will utilize case studies and films to keep information up to date.

Chicago Daily News: Operation Breadbasket

Monday, August 8, 1966

The Chicago Daily News posts an article highlighting Operation Breadbaskets success in opening up two hundred and twenty four jobs in Chicago's dairy industry for Negroes.

Powell's Court Suit Challenged by House Move

Saturday, April 1, 1967

Congressman Adam Clayton Powell, the first black Congressman from New York State, files a suit with the federal court to regain his congressional seat after being excluded from Congress due to "unauthorized travel at taxpayers' expense and payroll padding." This newspaper article briefly details Powell's suit and The House of Representatives' response to the charge. The case would eventually be heard by the Supreme Court in Powell vs. McCormack, leading to the Federal Contested Elections Act in 1969.

The Danger of A Little Progress

Saturday, February 15, 1964

In Dr. King's article, The Danger of a Little Progress, he discusses the work of the SCLC and SNCC in correlation to statistics regarding integrated housing and schools, as well as discrimination in employment. Dr. King concludes that there has been little progress among blacks in Atlanta statistically.

In the Battle for Desegregation

Tuesday, September 1, 1964

Francis Keppel, U.S. Commissioner of Education, expresses his thoughts on the solution for desegregation. Keppel believes the best way to end segregation is through education, providing children with an education and outstanding teachers.

The Jackie Robinson Saga

This brief biographical sketch highlights Jackie Robinson's life and his accomplishments as a baseball player, Army Lieutenant and business executive.

"Meaning of Georgia Elections"

Saturday, July 3, 1965

Dr. King speaks about the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's Summer Community Organization and Political Education Project (SCOPE). He also talks about the political advancements that were made in the south.

When Peace Becomes Obnoxious

This 1956 newspaper column is a re-print of a sermon delivered by Dr. King on segregation and events in Alabama.

Battle of Economic Opportunity

Friday, November 17, 1967

In this New York Post article, the author provides a perspective of the events leading to the Economic Opportunity Act as it pertains to both opposing sides; Democratic and Republican.

"They are Waiting for Godot in Mississippi, Too"

Sunday, January 31, 1965

This article, posted in the New York Times, discusses the play, "Waiting for Godot," held by the Free Southern Theatre in Mississippi. The play focuses on racial and social issues dealing with civil rights.

Observer: The Fiery Savior

Journalist Ponchitta Pierce sends Dr. King an article that details the press conference of "The Militant." In response to questioning, the individual expresses their discontent with liberal politics, the United States of America, and its presence in Vietnam.

What Moderation Means

Saturday, August 14, 1965

Dr. King explores the meaning of the word moderation, and shares his thoughts on its position in relation to nonviolence.

City Council Kills Hopes for Low Rental Apartment Complex

Sunday, September 3, 1967

This article, located in The Independent, covers a housing conflict in San Diego, California. The housing project would provide clean, modern apartments for the Negro population, using the extra land of Mt. Hope Cemetery. The goal of the project is to alleviate an area with over 4,000 substandard housing units. Approved by federal agencies, the project would also offer supplemented rent to those unable to afford the full amount. Despite approval, city council members rejected the idea due to opposition from white property owners and residents.

Operation Breadbasket

Saturday, December 10, 1966

Rev. Jesse Jackson meets with National Tea Company and Del Farm Foods representatives to sign an agreement that will create jobs for blacks.

Howe Fears Draft Of Too Many Students

This article discusses how Education Commissioner Harold Howe complained to a House Special Education Sub-Committee that more than a third of graduate students could expect to be drafted in the following year due to the changes in the Selective Service law.

Article Regarding New Head Start Project

Head Start is Shifted to College and Politics Behind OEO's Cutoffs.The two articles depicted provide details on the relationship between the Office of Economic Opportunity and the funds being cut off from the Child Development Group to be given to a small Mississippi college.

Postcard from Anonymous Sender to MLK

Tuesday, September 5, 1967

This postcard from an anonymous author contains a newspaper clipping which was published in the Athens Daily News. In the article, Archie Moore, former light heavyweight champion, gives his views about a "guaranteed national income."

SCLC Newsletter: June-July 1965

Thursday, July 1, 1965

The cover story for this 1965 SCLC Newsletter features Dr. King leading a March in Chicago, and also includes the usual wide gamut of Civil Rights Movement issues. Editor Ed Clayton's column discusses the "loss of fear" among Negroes, who "never again will be systematically excluded from office, or driven back from the voting booth."

Negro Leaders' Mistakes Hurting Civil Rights

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

In this article, David Lawrence explains his dissatisfaction with "Negro leaders" for supporting the actions of Adam Clayton Powell, who in Lawrence's mind, has abused his office and trust.

The Klansman Article Regarding MLK

This article on Dr. King appears in "The Klansman," a publication of the White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan of Mississippi. Dr. King, who is here referred to as the "Reverend Riot Inciter" and "Riot King," is alleged to have caused civil unrest in Leflore County and Greenwood, Mississippi.

City's Leaders Plan Dinner for MLK

Wednesday, January 6, 1965

This article announces a banquet to be held to honor Dr. King for his Nobel Peace Prize award. The banquet is hosted by various leaders in the City of Atlanta.