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A Call to Vietnam Week

VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This article discusses the Call to Vietnam Week, scheduled to take place April 8 through the 15th. The goal of this event was to promote grass roots awareness of war's destruction.

Negro Church Finest Hope for Christianity

Thursday, January 18, 1962
London, England, Pittsburgh, PA

Ruth Haefner forwards a publication from The Pittsburgh Courier which states, "the newly militant Negro theologians in America, may perform the miracle of raising the dead (Western Christendom) to life." She further expresses her hopes that Dr. King may do the work of reviving the Christian spirit with a weekly letter featured in London press.

Memo from the American Lutheran Church to Denver Area Pastors

Virginia (VA), Washington, D.C., Denver, CO

David Brown of the American Lutheran Church sends an article and copy of a letter from a pastor responding to the article to Denver area pastors. The article, published in "Common Sense," depicts Dr. King as a "Marxist tool" and agitator.

Newspaper Article Concerning Race Riot at Northwestern University

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

The author of this article gives an account of a race riot that occurred during a basketball game at Northwestern University.

Field Foundation Station on the Death of MLK

Friday, April 5, 1968
New York, NY

A portion of the statement on the death of Dr. King from the Field Foundations states, "As at other times of national shame and self-despair, what is at issue now is how ell we as a nation shall respond morally and politically." The heart of this statement reminds readers that the "ugly scars of racism and poverty will not be eliminated in this country until the people will it to be done."

The Integrity of Martin Luther King

Boston, MA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, VIETNAM

This letter was written in response to Dr. King's address concerning U.S. involvement in Vietnam. The address was given at the Ford Hall Forum, in Boston, MA. The author speaks to Dr. King's courage and integrity for humanity.

New York Times: US Judge Forbids A House Inquiry; Panel is Defiant

Tuesday, August 16, 1966
VIETNAM, Washington, D.C.

This article discusses the decision of a federal judge, ordering the House Committes of Un-American Activities to not hold a hearing on a bill that would make it illegal for Americans to aid the Vietcong.

The Danger of A Little Progress

Monday, February 3, 1964
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

This focuses on the issue of short term progress within the Civil Rights Movement because it does not offer long term lasting solutions.

"Barnett Says JFK Aids Reds"

Saturday, July 13, 1963
Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Oklahoma (OK), Tennessee (TN), New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA), Louisville, KY, Kentucky (KY)

In a testimony before the Senate Commerce Committee, Mississippi Governor Ross R. Barnett expresses his staunch opposition to President Kennedy's recent civil rights legislation. Governor Barnett goes as far as to associate recent Communist Party activities to the recent "racial agitation, strife, and conflict" emerging from the Civil Rights Movement.

Newspaper Article: "Giving Away a Library"

Sunday, July 10, 1966
Chicago, IL

This Chicago's Sunday AMERICAN newspaper article discusses the issue concerning the decision of the Chicago Law Institute to give the government their legal library without the consent of the membership.

"Delaware Hears Nixon Fight Bias"

Friday, October 1, 1954
Delaware (DE), Washington, D.C., California (CA)

This New York Times article provides details about Vice President Richard Nixon's decision to support the end of school segregation.

People in Action: Our New President

Saturday, February 1, 1964
New York (NY)

In this article in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King writes optimistically about the prospects for civil rights in the transition from President Kennedy to President Johnson. He believes that Johnson's Southern-ness may disarm the likes of George Wallace and that the President's proven commitment to civil rights and skills as Majority Leader in the Senate will aid in passing legislation.

The Blame in Birmingham

Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, South Carolina (SC)

The article, "The Blame in Birmingham", discusses the situation in Birmingham where four little girls were killed during a Sunday school class when a bomb was detonated. Governor Wallace's reaction and the consequences of the actions are mentioned in the article.

Newspaper Submissions on Race from U.S. Soldiers

This newspaper clipping features two submissions from U.S. Soldiers, both concerning racial issues.

Daily News: NAACP Anti-South Propaganda Article

Thursday, March 5, 1959
Jackson, MS, New York, NY, Richmond, VA, Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), Virginia (VA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The author writes about a secret meeting that was held at the NAACP's headquarters regarding race identification.

People In Action: "Virginia's Black Belt"

Saturday, April 14, 1962
Virginia (VA), Mississippi (MS), Prince Edward County, VA, Washington, D.C.

In this article from the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King describes his expereince on his "People to People" tour through the United States, noting his experience in the "black belt" in Virginia.

Why Integration Won't Slow Up

Tuesday, November 20, 1962
Iowa (IA), Mississippi (MS), Missouri (MO)

This article featured in the St. Louis Post Dispatch is an extract from Dr. King's address at Cornell College. Dr. King discusses three attitudes that can be taken toward the question of progress in race relations: extreme optimism, extreme pessimism and the realistic position.

A Big Johnny Reb Special Editorial

Sunday, April 9, 1967
Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The Big Johnny Reb Radio Show, a show syndicated throughout the State of Georgia, criticizes Dr. King for his position on the Vietnam War. The management of the radio station agrees with the view that too much American blood has been spilled, but they also state Dr. King should not denounce his own country's cause in the fight against Communism.

Birmingham Manifesto

Birmingham, AL

This manifesto details the methods, accomplishments, failures and reasons for the use and postponement of direct action tactics in Birmingham, Alabama.

Vietnam and the Conscience of U.S.A.

Monday, May 1, 1967
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, VIETNAM, Denver, CO, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

The author argues that the U.S. is fighting a false bogey of international communism in Vietnam at the expense of Great Society programs at home.

Teacher Exchange

Thursday, December 17, 1964
Connecticut (CT), New York (NY)

The Darien Board of Education exchange program is under scrutiny, given claims that African American teachers integrating into the majority Caucasian Connecticut school district will be unqualified to teach.

Anti-Semitism, Israel and SCLC:- A Statement on Press Distortions

Sunday, August 27, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Chicago, IL, Mississippi (MS), Cleveland, OH, ISRAEL, Alabama (AL)

This is a document that addresses the impression that the press created reporting that the SCLC was part of a group that condemned Israel and endorsed the policies of the Arab powers. This document also includes the annual report of the president by Dr. King.

Esquire Magazine: The Red Chinese American Negro

New York, NY, Baltimore, MD, North Carolina (NC), CHINA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, CUBA, Birmingham, AL, LIBERIA, Detroit, MI

This segment of Esquire Magazine features an article discussing the militant activities of Robert F. Williams. Williams had returned home from military service and headed the Monroe, North Carolina branch of the NAACP. Frustrated by the inactivity of local legislation to reform segregation and aggravated by Klu Klux Klan attacks, Williams adopted more violent methodologies. The article also emphasizes his association with Chinese leader Mao Tse-tung and discusses Tse-tung's solidarity with racial goodwill policies.

Birmingham Jail

Tuesday, December 7, 1965
Birmingham, AL, Missouri (MO)

Reverend Robert J. Leuver sends Dr. King an article titled "Birmingham Jail.". In the article, Harry Cargas learns that there are some members of the police force who support the Civil Rights Movement, but are too fearful to speak out against the racial atrocities. It was here that Mr. Cargas realized the ongoing struggle for outspoken and silent supporters of the movement for social change.

New York Amsterdam News: White-On-White Darien's Open Door

Saturday, December 12, 1964
New York (NY), Connecticut (CT), New York, NY

In this editorial Ms. Gertrude Wilson highlights a teacher exchange program in an affluent White community. This particular program aims to enrich the lives of students by integrating a diverse representation of professionals.

The U.S. Negro, 1953

Monday, May 11, 1953
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington (WA), Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, New York, NY, New York (NY), CANADA, San Francisco, CA, ITALY, Detroit, MI, Delaware (DE), Louisville, KY, SOUTH KOREA, Washington, D.C., KENYA, Tennessee (TN)

This Time Magazine article discusses socioeconomic components for the Negro in 1953. Topics range from the Mason-Dixon Line and Cadillacs, to the difference between Southern and Northern Negroes.

"Are We Ready"

This column by Joseph D. Bibb makes the argument that not only is "the colored American" ready for his civil rights, but also it is hypocritical to deny him those rights given the ignorance and savagery of many of his white counterparts.

Great Man

Gene Lyle writes the editor of a newspaper article entitled "Americans Need Some Discipline" to address unjustified criticism expressed against Dr. King. The author is certain that the article persuaded some readers that Dr. King "is to be feared and despised" for being a contributor to civil unrest. However, the writer predicts that "Dr. King will enter American history...as one of the great men of all time."

Help For Nigeria

Saturday, March 25, 1967
New York (NY), NIGERIA

Nigeria requests help from Negro civil rights leaders such as Dr. King, Randolph, and Roy Wilkins. Nigerians feel that the hate between the government and its people will result in war.

Political Cartoon: The FBI Adds

VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This satirical cartoon in the Nashville Banner equates protests in the U.S. with the Communist buildup in Vietnam.