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"Articles"

The Man Who Knows: General Westmoreland on Vietnam

Tuesday, April 25, 1967
New York (NY), VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This editorial from a New York newspaper features statements from General William C. Westmoreland arguing for the public's support "about what is going on in Viet Nam, and why." Dr. King is among those listed as having opposing viewpoints towards the War.

Dr. King Plans '67 Pilgrimage to Holy Land

PALESTINIAN TERRITORY, OCCUPIED, JORDAN, ISRAEL

This newspaper clipping outlines plans for Dr. King's Pilgrimage to the Holy Land.

Dr. King on Vietnam: Demagogic Tactics

VIETNAM

Brigadier General S. L. A. Marshall critiques Dr. King's Vietnam stance and asserts that Dr. King's position undermines his work and credibility as a civil rights leader.

Negro Morality and Why Didnt She Stay Home?

Louisiana (LA), Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), California (CA), North Carolina (NC), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, recommends two articles published in The Carolina Israelite. "Negro Morality" makes distinctions between crime committed by impoverished Negroes and their ethically challenged white counterparts. The second article,"Why Didn't She Stay Home?" discusses tactics of the "Far Right," the ignoring of crimes committed against Negroes, and the role of both white and black clergy in the preservation of Christian ideals.

Beyond the Los Angeles Riots

Saturday, November 13, 1965
Los Angeles, CA, Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King discusses the legacy of the Los Angeles riots in nonviolent protest. A decade after the Montgomery Civil Rights demonstrations, Dr. King speaks to the improvement of Southern African Americans' lives and the degradation of Northern African Americans' situations.

Wipe Out Police Brutality

Wednesday, January 1, 1964
Tennessee (TN), Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C.

This news bulletin created by the Nashville chapter of NAACP and the Davidson County Tennessee Independent Political Council implores African Americans to take action against police brutality and racial discrimination. To illustrate the point, the bulletin contains several pictures capturing police actions against student demonstrators. The article encourages the community's 30,000 unregistered Negro voters to "join the fight for freedom" by registering to vote, writing their Congressmen, and making their voices heard.

Organize Voter Registration in North

Georgia (GA), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King discusses the gap in black and white voters across the US,specifically in the North. King organizes speeches and a tour across Northern cities to get blacks registered to vote.

"Delaware Hears Nixon Fight Bias"

Friday, October 1, 1954
Delaware (DE), Washington, D.C., California (CA)

This New York Times article provides details about Vice President Richard Nixon's decision to support the end of school segregation.

The Nobel Couple

Thursday, December 10, 1964
Oslo, Norway, NORWAY

The cover photo of the December 1964 issue of The American Chronicle captures Dr. and Mrs. King after they discover he was named the winner of the year's Nobel Peace Prize.

We are Still Walking

Saturday, December 1, 1956
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King describes how African Americans reacted to the Klan's plan to intimidate them after the decision of the Supreme Court. Although deeply involved in the bus protest, Dr. King stated that there were other goals to achieve such as establishing a bank and credit union in Montgomery for African Americans.

The Negro Speaks

New York (NY), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Several prominent African Americans describe the issues that plague the black community. Some of these issues include poverty, segregation, civil rights and race relations.

Letter and Article from D. Parke Gibson to MLK

Wednesday, July 12, 1967
New York, NY, Philadelphia, PA, Cleveland, OH, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

D. Parke Gibson sends this article in Race Relations and Industry to Dr. King with the intention of including him in a future issue of the magazine. Those involved in the article agree that progress towards having minorities in leadership roles is on the rise, but not fast enough.

"Negro Rights: Key Dates"

Louisiana (LA), Texas (TX), Oklahoma (OK)

This image depicts the chronological history of laws passed as it pertains to the life and wellbeing of Negros. The first date of reference is January 1st, 1863, the day when slavery was abolished.

Why Negroes Are Still Angry

Friday, July 1, 1966
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), New York, NY, Philadelphia, PA, Detroit, MI, Connecticut (CT), Cleveland, OH, Chicago, IL, Texas (TX), Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

American journalist Victor Bernstein details for Redbook why Negroes are still angry in the face of the apparent success of the Civil Rights Movement. He points out that the Movement has enabled many whites to see that integration and equal rights are right, but still knowingly choose to behave as if they are wrong.

A Call to Vietnam Week

VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This article discusses the Call to Vietnam Week, scheduled to take place April 8 through the 15th. The goal of this event was to promote grass roots awareness of war's destruction.

People to People: Civil Rights and Negative Normalcy

Saturday, March 12, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Jackson, MS, Brooklyn, NY, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA)

Dr. King attempts to answer questions from white liberals concerning the progress and importance of the Civil Rights Movement.

People to People: Is Non-Violence Doomed to Failure?

Saturday, February 12, 1966
Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King shares his view on the criticism that the nonviolent philosophy in America is disintegrating. Reviewing the historical success of nonviolence, he contends that the "unselfish" element of the movement is what has ensured its victory for all races in the past, and will continue to spur it to victory in the future. He surmises that proponents of nonviolence "shall be able, not only to remove injustice, but to establish in its place freedom and social peace for all Americans."

Article Regarding Harry Belafonte and Associates Denied Service

Friday, June 1, 1962
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

This article states, Harry Belafonte and associates were denied lunch service at the King's Inn Restaurant. Dr. King issued a statement that no action will be taken at the present time, due to the loss of several distinguished leaders in a recent air disaster.

"Are We Ready"

This column by Joseph D. Bibb makes the argument that not only is "the colored American" ready for his civil rights, but also it is hypocritical to deny him those rights given the ignorance and savagery of many of his white counterparts.

Redbook: The Police

Wednesday, February 1, 1967
New York (NY), Philadelphia, PA, California (CA), Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL

In this article from Redbook magazine, Sam Blum informs readers that policemen are not only "crime fighters" but also are expected to be skilled in numerous other areas as well. He exposes the FBI's often inaccurate assessment of the cost of crime and states that this is an effort to keep the public in fear and generate increased funding. Blum discusses the different experiences of the middle class and slum-dwellers, the perception of police brutality, and the need for professionalized training.

"Attorney's Arrest is Protested"

Thursday, August 18, 1966
Washington, D.C., Texas (TX), New York (NY), San Francisco, CA

This Washington Post article, entitled "Attorney's Arrest is Protested", talks about Arthur Kinoy's arrest and the complications that aroused as a result of it.

Advice for Living

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Oklahoma (OK)

Dr. King addresses questions in the "Advice for Living" column published in Ebony Magazine on February 12, 1958.

SCLC Newsletter: September 1962

Saturday, September 1, 1962
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), CONGO / ZAIRE, Atlanta, GA, North Carolina (NC), Mississippi (MS), South Carolina (SC), New York, NY, New York (NY), Tallahassee, FL, Florida (FL), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), West Virginia (WV), Birmingham, AL, New Jersey (NJ)

Dr. King discusses the terrible cost of securing voting rights for blacks, especially in Leesburg, Georgia, where the Shady Grove Baptist Church was bombed and burned following the SNCC's use of the space to register voters.

Nonviolence: The Only Road to Freedom

Los Angeles, CA, California (CA), New York (NY), New York, NY, GHANA, ZAMBIA, ZIMBABWE, SOUTH AFRICA, TANZANIA, NIGERIA, ANGOLA, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, INDIA, Georgia (GA)

In this article, Dr. King argues that the American Negro's salvation will be reached by "rejecting the racism, materialism and violence that has characterized Western civilization" and working instead toward a world of brotherhood and cooperation. The civil rights leader denounces recent violent uprisings in urban ghettos, as they only contribute to the growing frustrations and issues perpetuating America's racial divide.

My Dream: Peace - God's Business and Man's

Saturday, November 27, 1965
VIETNAM, New York, NY, Chicago, IL, Selma, AL, Washington, D.C.

This document is a draft in progress of an article wrote for the Chicago Defender. Dr. King conveys his desire for war to be eliminated as an option to solve the nation's problems. He feels that full equality will never come to pass unless solutions involving violence are deemed to be methods of the past.

SCLC Newsletter: February 1964

Saturday, February 1, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Ohio (OH), Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C., Florida (FL), North Carolina (NC), Wisconsin (WI), SOUTH AFRICA

This SCLC newsletter covers items ranging from Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize nomination to voter registration drives throughout the country. The lead photo features national civil rights leaders "summoned to the White House for a special conference with President Lyndon B. Johnson."

The Klansman Article Regarding MLK

Mississippi (MS), Greenwood, MS

This article on Dr. King appears in "The Klansman," a publication of the White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan of Mississippi. Dr. King, who is here referred to as the "Reverend Riot Inciter" and "Riot King," is alleged to have caused civil unrest in Leflore County and Greenwood, Mississippi.

"Dr. King Outdated"

Saturday, July 15, 1967
North Carolina (NC), VIETNAM

This editorial reviews Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" Under the heading "Dr. King Outdated." The review expresses Mr. Bob Smith's disagreement with many themes of the book.

Walter Winchell: American Talking Back

VIETNAM, Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, California (CA), New York (NY), New York, NY, Texas (TX), Philadelphia, PA

In this article, Walter Winchell provides excerpts of news articles and adds his own commentary to each. Following an excerpt about Dr. King's having a conference to coordinate civil disobedience activities, Winchell urges his leaders to write to Dr. King and "tell him to stop posing as a Man of Peace and 'fess up that his big "act" is causing more trouble than Ho Chi Mihn." Other recipients of Winchell's attention in this column include President Lyndon B. Johnson.

Revolution in the Delta: Farm Hands Go on Strike

Mississippi (MS)

David R. Underhill discusses the strike of farm laborers in various Mississippi Delta cities. Underhill highlights strike procedures, methods, and locations.