Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Correspondence"

Letter from Dr. Herzl Ragins to MLK

Wednesday, March 1, 1967
New York (NY)

Dr. Herzl Ragins writes to Dr. King, denouncing him because of his support for Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter from Dora McDonald to L. H. Horace Perera

Thursday, May 26, 1966
SWITZERLAND, Atlanta, GA, Geneva, Switzerland

Dora McDonald responds to a letter of recent date from Mr. L. H. Perera regarding an invitation for Dr. King to speak at an event. McDonald states the Dr. King is out of town and will respond once he arrives.

Letter of Thanks from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Monday, February 25, 1963
Atlanta, GA

Dr. Benjamin E. Mays, president of Morehouse College, expresses appreciation to Dr. King for financial support to the college.

Letter from James Marley to MLK

Tuesday, September 24, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

James Marley, Secretary and Treasurer of the Hotel and Club Employees Union Local 6, encloses a contribution to the SCLC "to aid [with] the great task to obtain equality for all Americans."

Letter from MLK to Theodore W. Kheel

Tuesday, September 8, 1964
New York, NY, Berlin, Germany

Dr. King graciously declines attorney and noted labor mediator Theodore Kheel's invitation to sit on the Dais at the International Longshoremen's 50th Anniversary Dinner due to a previous commitment in Berlin, Germany.

Letter from Warren R. Austin to MLK

Wednesday, September 17, 1958

In this letter, Mr. Austin, Honorary Chairman of The Committee of One Million, writes to Dr. King and encloses an advanced review copy of the "Black Book on Red China." The book is scheduled to be published soon and was commissioned by the Committee of One Million as an "international public service."

Message of Thanksgiving to SCLC Staff

Xernona Clayton wishes the SCLC staff a Happy Thanksgiving.

Letter from Ralph J. Bunch to Raphael Gould

Thursday, May 13, 1965
New York (NY)

Though Ralph J. Bunche agrees with the "Unique Value and Importance of Education for Peace", he is unsure to the effectiveness of the principle.

Letter from J. Percy to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967
New Jersey (NJ)

J. Percy sends Dr. King an unpleasant note asserting that he is always complaining. Percy also wishes that Dr. King would stop talking about slums.

Letter from Vice President Hubert Humphrey to MLK Regarding Crisis in Detroit

Thursday, August 3, 1967
Michigan (MI)

In this letter, Vice President of the United States of America, Hubert Humphrey, writes to Dr. King to thank him for his statements promoting nonviolence in the crisis situation in Detroit, Michigan.

Letter from Hester DeLacy to MLK

Los Angeles, CA

Hester De Lacy contributes to the SCLC and expresses an urgent need for written copies of Dr. King's speeches. Mr. De Lacy informs Dr. King that he would prefer a copy of a speech delivered to a large and small audience in both the North and South of the country.

Letter from MLK to Donald Fletcher

Friday, November 22, 1968
Alabama (AL)

In this letter, Dr. King offers his deep gratitude to the contribution made by Donald Fletcher. He acknowledges that because of the support of the contributors, the initiatives of the SCLC can continue to flourish.

Letter from Lily E. Sternlow to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968
SOUTH AFRICA, Atlanta, GA

With topics ranging from "The Poor Pay More for Less" to the featured article "Malawi's Anti-Christian Atrocities - A Shame on Africa," this edition of "Awake" magazine is forwarded by Lily Sternlow to Dr. King. After receiving word of Dr. King's travels to Africa, Sternlow brings attention to issues surrounding Christian witnesses in Malawi.

Letter from Edmond F. Tommy to Senator Edward W. Brooke

Monday, April 3, 1967
Washington, D.C., Connecticut (CT), SOUTH KOREA, NORTH KOREA, CHINA, VIETNAM, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, JAPAN, FRANCE, GERMANY

Mr. Toomy, a veteran of the first World War, writes to Senator Brooke detailing his stance on current military efforts. He provides a historical outline of war related events in relation to the United States military. He asserts that other Negro leaders are hindering progress in the Civil Rights movement due to their lack of patriotism.

Letter from H.M. Arrowsmith to MLK

AUSTRALIA, London, England, UNITED KINGDOM, New York (NY), New York, NY, PAPUA NEW GUINEA

General Secretary of the British and Foreign Bible Society in Australia, Canon H. M. Arrowsmith, M.B.E., extends Dr. King an official invitation to visit Australia in May 1967. It is the Society's hope that Dr. King's trip will focus primarily on the role of the Bible in relation to the "stature and the status of Man" and the "question of racial equality" throughout the world.

Letter from Martin Kessler to MLK

Thursday, November 10, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, CHINA, SOUTH AFRICA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM, Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, Maryland (MD), Baltimore, MD, CANADA

Martin Kessler sends Dr. King an article by Daniel P. Moynihan entitled "Is There Really an Urban Crisis?" Moynihan addresses issues of the economic and social conditions in America in the interview with Challenge Magazine.

Letter from the Committee To Secure Justice for Morton Sobell to MLK

Tuesday, April 10, 1962
New York, NY, Washington, D.C., New York (NY)

Helen Sobell, wife of Morton Sobell and co-chair of the committee trying to free him, requests that Dr. King write a letter supporting the approval of his parole. She includes an attachment explaining the parole process and contact information for the US Board of Parole.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, May 22, 1964
New York, NY

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that the British Broadcasting Company wants to read extracts from "Strength to Love" in their "First Day of the Week" program.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Jutson Sapp

Friday, July 10, 1964
Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes Mr. Sapp expressing how unhappy he is concerning Mr. Sapp's difficulty in receiving assistance from the Social Security Program.

MLK - Form Letter Draft

Dr. King writes a form letter to acknowledge the "sacrifices, fasting, and prayer" from people throughout the world.

Request from Wm. James Stuart to MLK

Monday, June 14, 1965
Kentucky (KY), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

Wm. James Stuart, a student, seeks the recommendation of books that helped Dr. King develop his own way of preaching.

Letter from William L. Harris to MLK

Sunday, March 10, 1968
Virginia (VA)

William Harris, vice-chairman of the Extra Legal Forum at the Law School of the University of Virginia, invites Dr. King to speak at a Forum event.

Memo from Joan Daves to MLK

Thursday, May 28, 1964
New York, NY

In this memo, Joan Daves informs Dr. King, along with others, that the Detroit News will run installments for "Why We Cant Wait." They are also told that the copyright will be in Dr. King's name and that credit will be given to Harper and NAL.

Condolence Letter to Coretta Scott King from Lyman G. Farrar

In this letter Mr. Farrar writes, "Dr. King symbolized for me the celebrant of the century in terms of newness of life in Jesus Christ." With a deep sense of gratitude he reveals the indelible affect Dr. King had on his life and his ministry, as a white middle class male.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Taban

SUDAN, KENYA

Dr. King expresses his concern for Mr. Taban's welfare in Kenya after fleeing Sudan.

Letter from Helga Gulbrandsen to MLK

Thursday, February 13, 1964
Oslo, Norway, Atlanta, GA, London, England

Helga Gulbrandsen invites Dr. King to speak for the Norwegian Fellowship in Oslo, Norway.

Letter from Joseph McKinney to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965
West Virginia (WV), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Selma, AL

Reverend Lee Wright invites Dr. King to speak at the Annual Spring Membership Campaign for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Wheeling Branch in West Virginia.

Congratulatory Letter from YWCA to MLK

Tuesday, October 20, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

The YWCA congratulates Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from A. Philip Randolph to President Lyndon Johnson

Tuesday, July 18, 1967
Washington, D.C., New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ)

A. Philip Randolph, the President of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters (an AFL-CIO affiliate), writes to President Johnson to urge him to convene a small group of national civil rights leaders to advise local leaders and businessmen on how to deal with the escalation of riots occurring all over the country.

Letter from Mrs. W. Brown to MLK

Mrs. W. Brown proclaims that Dr. King should preach a colorblind love that is absent of hate and resentment toward white people. She further asserts that the contributions Dr. King received could have been used to improve substandard housing. Mrs. Brown continues to discuss her perception of the inadequacies within the black community in comparison to white people.