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"Correspondence"

Letter from Harry Wachtel to David Hunter

Wednesday, November 2, 1966

Mr. Wachtel expresses gratitude for a grant awarded by the Stern Family Fund to the American Foundation on Nonviolence and the SCLC.

Letter from James R. Herrington to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

James R. Herrington wrote this adverse letter to Dr. King, calling both him and his doctrine of civil disobedience "trash." Herrington ends his letter by saying that President Johnson cared more for Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement than the rest of the country, and therefore, won't be president again.

Letter from MLK to Attorney Bell

Dr. King writes Attorney Bell thanking him for offering his services "to the Freedom Movement and the work of the SCLC."

Letter from Bond R. Faulwell to MLK

Friday, November 8, 1963

Faulwell, a freshman at Grinnell College, is writing a term paper on civil rights for a political science course and requests advice from Dr. King as an "acknowledged leader" of the protest movement.

Letter from William R. Rice to MLK

Thursday, October 20, 1966

William Rice, editorial director for WLS radio in Chicago, offers Dr. King suggestions for Operation Dropout. Also enclosed in the letter is a statement on the reasons to stay in school.

Letter from June Parker to MLK

June Parker writes to Dr. King with much hesitation, stating that what she is going to say has been on her heart for a long time. Parker writes that she believes Negroes, such as herself, must be free in all aspects of life and not just a few areas. She writes she is not a fan of Dr. King's urging to vote Democrat, and alleges that the Democratic Party gave Dr. King $50,000 for his support. She further states Democrats are just getting their friends to be millionaires while slaughtering young men in their prime.

Letter from Charles Harris to MLK

Monday, March 22, 1965

Pastor Charles Harris of the Calvary Baptist Church encloses a check to Dr. King in support of the Selma to Montgomery March. He regrets his inability to participate in the march due to his wife's illness.

Letter from Richard Dannenfelser to MLK

Friday, July 1, 1966

The acting chaplain of Ohio Wesleyan University inquires of Dr. King's availability to speak at their college during his trip to Columbus. Dr. King is scheduled to address the Ohio Council of Churches Pastors' Convention.

Letter from Edward Wright to MLK

Edward Wright, a member of the Black Panther Party, request Dr. King helps his leader, Huey P. Newton. Newton was wrongfully charged with murder of an Oakland city policeman during the fight for freedom.

Letter from The American Foundation On Nonviolence to David Hunter

Thursday, January 18, 1968

The American Foundation On Nonviolence makes an inquiry to the distribution of grant funds from David Hunter.

Correspondence from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, November 20, 1964

Joan Daves writes Dr. King and attaches a letter from Pierre Servais, a publisher who plans to translate King's book "Strength to Love" to French. Servais also inquires if Dr. King can visit Paris or Brussels while he is in Europe, as his appearance would create an excellent opportunity to launch the sale of his book.

Letter from June Alder to MLK

Monday, August 8, 1966

Mrs. Alder expresses her support and concern regarding integrated housing.

Letter of Support to MLK While In Jail

Tuesday, October 31, 1967

Silas Townsend wrote this letter to Dr. King upon his jailing in Birmingham in 1967. Townsend writes how appropriate it is that Dr. King is jailed on All Saints Day.

Letter From A. S. Raman to MLK

Thursday, December 8, 1966

In this letter, Raman invites Dr. King to be a part of a discussion in the anniversary issue of the Indian Republic by contributing about 800 to the article.

Letter from Leonard Newell to MLK

Friday, March 1, 1968

Leonard A. Newell writes to Dr. King to ask for his opinion about the pursuit of a consumer strike to protest the War in Vietnam.

Letter from MLK to Mr. A. Fouche

Wednesday, February 6, 1963

Dr. King expresses appreciation for Mr. Fouche's hospitality during his visit to the Bay Area.

Letter from Harry Denman to Billy Graham and MLK

Friday, June 18, 1965

Harry Denman, an evangelist at the Methodist Church in Nashville, Tennessee, writes to Dr. King and Dr. Billy Graham in the hope that they will appear together for eight consecutive nights on a television program to be broadcast nationally and themed "God's Society."

Letter from John R. Yungblut to CSK

Monday, August 2, 1965

Mr. Yungblut of Quaker House, writes Mrs. King to inquire whether the King Children may be interested in participating in a youth dramatics program.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Bent Ostergaard

Wednesday, October 20, 1965

Miss McDonald informs Mr. Ostergaard that Dr. King is unable to accept his recent invitation to visit Copenhagen.

Letter from Joan Daves Regarding International Travel

Tuesday, September 15, 1964

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that she telephoned Mr. Smeaton regarding lodging arrangements in London and Berlin.

Letter from Eugene Exman to MLK

Tuesday, May 28, 1963

Mr. Exman writes to Dr. King to inform him that the Religious Book Club has chosen "Strength to Love" as a selection. Exman adds that 9,000 advance copies will be published despite concerns about the book's reception in the south.

Letter from Maschera Pier-Carlo to MLK

Friday, October 6, 1967

Maschera Pier-Carlo, a citizen of Italy, writes Dr. King informing him that his book "Strength to Love" helped her understand the true value of Christian love and God.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding "A Stride to Freedom"

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

In this letter, J. Campe encloses the German royalties, received from J.G. Onken, for Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom" German language edition.

Letter from Gino David Dassatti to MLK

Tuesday, May 9, 1967

Gino David Dassatti expresses his concern that Dr. King's stand on the war in Vietnam may deem him a traitor. In Dassatti's words, "The blood of these Americans will rest forever on your soul and conscience."

Letter from University of King's College to MLK

Monday, February 3, 1964

The University of King's College sends a follow up letter to Dr. King inquiring if he will accept their offer to receive an Honorary Doctorate of Civil Law.

Letter from Congressman Charles Diggs to MLK

Monday, July 22, 1963

Michigan Congressman Charles Diggs returns the proposed plans for the August 28th, 1963 "March on Washington" to Dr. King.

Letter from Marion Hoyt to MLK

Friday, May 26, 1961

Marian Hoyt, manager of the Winsor School's Senior Play, writes Dr. King, providing him a donation on the behalf of the school in Boston. The writer cites specifically appreciation for Dr. King's "work in Montgomery."

Letter from Senator Robert F. Kennedy to MLK

Thursday, March 31, 1966

Senator Robert Kennedy thanks Dr. King for a previous correspondence and expresses his aligned views regarding nonviolent reconciliation. Senator Kennedy believes in the preservation of dignity and freedom internationally without imposing "incessant military conflict" upon those with unaligned views. He references Dr. King's statement regarding the precedence of progress in America to that of other countries. He also wishes to hear Dr. King's reaction to a series of his speeches on "A Program for the Urban Crisis" that he has attached.

Letter from W. L. Overholser to MLK

Saturday, August 13, 1966

W.L. Overholser of Winnimac, Indiana proposes that the SCLC change its tactics and support the Peace Welfare Party that he is forming. He maintains that, because too few people control too much of the country's wealth, a lack of jobs creates too much feuding and racial prejudice. Overholser argues that neither party can serve both the richest 10%, who control all the wealth, and the other 90% of the country, because the disparity makes most politicians two-faced. Overholser feels that whites and blacks should focus on forming a new party, and asks Dr.

Letter from James T. Hale to MLK

Tuesday, September 22, 1964

Morehouse alumnus James T. Hale invites Dr. King to speak to the community in Clarksville, Tennessee. He expresses how the majority of the community has not had the opportunity to hear Dr. King speak and asks that Dr. King provide a possible date.