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The Southern Struggle - What Can You Do?

North Carolina (NC), Atlanta, GA, Montgomery, AL

Corretta Scott King discusses the privilege of being able to experience a great social revolution based on love and nonviolence, as inspired by the teachings of Jesus and Gandhi. She identifies Rosa Park's personal protest on a bus in Montgomery, Alabama as the beginning of the southern struggle and consequent revolution. She goes on to describe how this simple act aroused a great movement across the south, ultimately leading to the creation of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in January of 1957.

Ghettos and Segregation in City Urbanizing

Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., Los Angeles, CA

Dr. King writes this speech explaining the current economic and social conditions of city ghettos. As cities urbanize, ghettos expand and segregation increases. "The ghetto has become the hallmark of our major cities just as truly as the cities themselves are becoming the hallmark of the nation." Though the last thirty years has seen advancements in legislation, what remains unrecognized is the gap between legislation intent and the actualization of community programs that have tangible affects on the neighborhoods.

Joint Statement of MLK and SCLC

Friday, April 30, 1965
Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King and John Lewis deliver a statement concerning a meeting presided over by Harry Belafonte. The meeting was intended to discover ways that the SCLC and SNCC could cooperate and concluded with an agreement for both organizations to work together but separately towards a voting bill and other goals.

Dr. King Sermon Notes

Missouri (MO)

Under the subject, "The Vision of a World Made New," Dr. King drafted these sermon notes. The essential message of the sermon referred to a need for a "new world order". Plato and Karl Marx are two of the great philosophers referenced in this document. Dr. King delivered this sermon at the annual meeting of the Woman's Convention Auxiliary, National Baptist Convetion in St. Louis, Missouri on September 9, 1954.

Institute on Nonviolent Resistance to Segregation

Tuesday, August 11, 1959

The SCLC publishes this manifesto declaring that all eyes are focused on the South as it confronts the controversial issues of freedom and equality for Negroes. In the quest for equality, the southern Negros' plan of defense is Christian love and non-violent resistance. The document not only reveals tragic conditions in the South, but also affirms five principles by which equality can be achieved for Negro citizens.

Press Internationale Concludes Fifth Year of Broadcasting Over WBKB-TV

Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, GERMANY, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, INDIA, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC, CHINA, UNITED KINGDOM, London, England, LUXEMBOURG, FRANCE

Le Van Enterprises, Inc. announces that Press Internationale,a television show that provides analysis of international issues, has completed five years of weekly broadcasting in Chicago.

Non-Violent Procedures to Inter-Racial Harmony

Tuesday, October 16, 1956
New York (NY)

In this early speech to a NY Universalists' convention, Dr. King lays out his nonviolence method, based on Gandhi's. He outlines five of the six principles he will use later. They are: active, courageous resistance; winning the moral conversion of the opponent, not defeating him; attacking the forces of evil, rather than the persons doing evil; using love to avoid "internal violence of the spirit"; and faith in the inclination of the universe towards justice.

Eulogy for Robert W. Spike

Dr. King highlights the life and work of American clergyman, theologian, and civil rights leader, Robert W. Spike. Spike was a leader known for mobilizing church participation for the Civil Rights Movement. Less than one year after accepting a professorship at the University of Chicago, he was murdered.

MLK Address at the University of Chicago

Thursday, January 27, 1966
Chicago, IL, Los Angeles, CA, Virginia (VA), Massachusetts (MA), New York, NY

Dr. King delivers this speech at the University of Chicago on January 27, 1966. He expounds upon the struggles of the Negro family in America, explaining the social and economic challenges the Negro faces along with the affects of slavery.

Statement to Be Used If There is a Victory for Reagan

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), Maryland (MD)

SCLC prepares a contingency statement, with Dr. King's handwritten edits. The statement asserts that some elections' newly overt racism reflects the prejudice and bigotry in America. The statement calls on Negroes to collaborate with honest white allies to gain legal and moral rights.

MLK's Statement Upon Return to Montgomery

Friday, October 24, 1958
Montgomery, AL, New York, NY

Dr. King expounds on his brutal attack by the "deranged woman" Izola Ware Curry, in which he was stabbed near the heart. He stresses the importance of remaining committed to nonviolence and says he is grateful for the outpouring of sympathy and affection he received while in the hospital.

MLK Comments on Jack O'Dell's Alleged Communist Ties

Dr. King attempts to correct the erroneous impressions created by various newspapers alleging Jack O'Dell's connection to "Communist" activities. While Dr. King maintains Mr. O'Dell's strong work performance, the Detroit native will relinquish his role "in order to avoid embarrassment to SCLC."

MLK Announcement of Rally to be held in San Francisco

San Francisco, CA, California (CA)

Dr. King announces the details for a rally in San Francisco, California to garner support for the pending Civil Rights Bill in Congress. He makes a call to action for various diverse groups to join in this initiative.

The Real Poverty

Sunday, December 4, 1966
Alabama (AL)

SCLC Director of Public Relations Junius Griffin announces the opening of the Anti-Poverty Coordinating Committee of the Wilcox County, Alabama branch of the SCLC. Throughout the speech, he asserts that true poverty is a "man without compassion," and that any person who does not know how to help others is worse off than "our ancestors who were slaves."

MLK Address at Dinner Honoring Jackie Robinson

Friday, July 20, 1962
New York, NY, Albany, GA

This is the transcript of Dr. King's address at the 1962 Hall of Fame Dinner honoring Jackie Robinson in New York City. Dr. King praises Robinson for standing up for civil rights as the first Negro to break Major League Baseball's color barrier.

Draft of I Have a Dream

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C.

This version of Dr. King's famous "I Have a Dream" speech reveals important changes to ideas and phrases that Dr. King chose either to alter or omit completely the day he addressed the throng gathered before the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. Dr. King's argument against the "normalcy" of bigotry remained a key message on the day he took the podium.

Excerpts from The Negro and the American Dream

Sunday, September 25, 1960
North Carolina (NC), South Africa, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, UNITED KINGDOM

In this address to the Charlotte, North Carolina branch of the NAACP, Dr. King outlines five actions that Negroes must address in order to ensure their own first-class citizenship.

Press Conference on Chicago Movement

Wednesday, July 7, 1965
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King shares his acceptance of the invitation to spend some time in Chicago. During his time in Chicago, Dr. King and other SCLC leaders plan to assist local civil rights organizations in organizing rallies throughout the city.

Address by Jackie Robinson at SCLC Freedom Dinner

Tuesday, September 25, 1962
Albany, GA, Birmingham, AL, New York (NY), New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), ITALY, CANADA

Guest speaker Jackie Robinson discusses his personal struggles with adopting the philosophy of nonviolence, race relations and the far-reaching efforts of the SCLC.

Statement on Penance for Violence in Albany, Georgia

Monday, July 30, 1962
Albany, GA

Dr. King calls for a day of penance that will serve as a tactic of the self-purification step of the nonviolence method. Dr. King urges for the City Commission to talk with leaders of the Albany Movement.

Tonight Show Appearance Press Release

Wednesday, January 31, 1968
Washington, D.C.

The SCLC announces that Dr. King will appear on the Tonight Show with Harry Belafonte filling in for Johnny Carson as host. Comedian Nipsey Russell and actor Paul Newman, both active in the civil rights movement, will also be guests. Dr. King looks forward to this opportunity to speak about the upcoming Poor People?s Campaign.

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

Friday, December 11, 1964
Oslo, Norway, New York, NY, New York (NY), London, England, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

On December 11, 1964, Dr. King delivered his Nobel lecture at the University of Oslo. Aware of the prestigious nature of the award and the global recognition for the nonviolent struggle to eradicate racial injustice in the U.S., King worked nearly a month on this address. He went far beyond his dream for America and articulated his vision of a World House in which a family of different races, religions, ideas, cultures and interests must learn to live together as brothers and sisters or perish together as fools. For citations, go to Dr. King's lecture at nobleprize.org.

Nobel Lecture by MLK

Friday, December 11, 1964
Oslo, Norway, EGYPT

This is a copy of the Lecture given by Dr. King in Oslo, Norway upon his winning the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. He thanks the Norwegian Parliament for honoring him with this award. He speaks of the evils of racially injustice and the belief that "oppressed people cannot remain oppressed forever." He speaks of the need to peacefully come together in harmony as humanity because a peaceful world cannot be built based on a "negative path."

Freedom Festival Speech on Chicago Campaign

Chicago, IL, Detroit, MI, New York (NY), Los Angeles, CA, CONGO / ZAIRE, BELGIUM, Mississippi (MS), Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

At the Freedom Festival a speech was made in regards to the Chicago Campaign. The campaign focuses on the urban renewal of the area. Specifically, it discusses the unemployment rate and housing conditions of African-Americans.

MLK Speaks on the African American Family

Thursday, January 27, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Virginia (VA), Massachusetts (MA), New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. King speaks to an assembly in Chicago, Illinois about the history and dynamics of the African American family in the United States.

Address by MLK to the National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962
Washington, D.C., Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

During an address to the National Press Club in Washington, Dr. King declares the time for racial justice has arrived.

Address by MLK at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

Wednesday, April 19, 1961

In his address to the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Dr. King discusses the subject of the "Church on the Frontier of Racial Tension." King describes the crisis state of the US as it passes from an old order of segregation to a new order of integration, proclaiming that this is both a moral issues as well as a political issues. King implores the church to open the channels of communication between races and institute social reform, especially economic justice. Lastly, he invites all people to step into the new age with understanding and creative good will in their hearts.

MLK's Statement at Prayer Rally in Albany, Georgia

Wednesday, August 15, 1962
Albany, GA

After the bombing of a local church, Dr. King delivered this statement attempting to both criticize the actions of the perpetrators and provide a sense of calm to Albany demonstrators.

The Power of Nonviolence

Thursday, May 1, 1958
Montgomery, AL, Berkeley, CA

Dr. King delivers this address to the YMCA and YWCA in the Bay Area of California. The power of nonviolence is discussed being intertwined with the knowledge of agape, love and maladjustment. Agape can be defined as an understanding of the redemptive good will of all men. In relation to maladjustment, Dr. King explains how he never intended to adjust himself to segregation and discrimination. Dr. King expounds on how justice strengthened the Montgomery movement. He further explains how the powerful influence of love is a significant factor in the practice of nonviolence.