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"Speeches"

Statement on CORE Supportive Action Against Variety Chain Store Discrimination in the South

Sunday, February 12, 1961
Kentucky (KY), South Carolina (SC), Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

The Congress of Racial Equality issues a statement regarding economic boycotts of chain stores in the North that have segregated stores in the South. These boycotts are in support of desegregation efforts in the South.

Statement of the Committee for Emmett Doe

VIETNAM, Georgia (GA)

The Committee for Emmett Doe issues a statement both explaining Doe's situation and also asking for support. Doe, an Army paramedic, faced court-martial for allegedly cursing a white superior. He was later acquitted of the charges.

MLK Press Statement Regarding Riots in Los Angeles

Friday, August 20, 1965
Los Angeles, CA

In this statement to the press, Dr. King comments on the Watts Riots that took place in Los Angeles, California. He further discusses the economic, social and racial inequalities that he feels were the cause of the violence.

A Message from Jail

Saturday, July 21, 1962
Albany, GA

After being arrested and charged with parading without a license, Dr. King wrote a column from jail. The column shared his and Ralph David Abernathy's decision to serve the jail sentence instead of paying a fine of $178.

Statement by Roy Wilkins to Congress

Thursday, January 12, 1967

The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights adopted this statement by Roy Wilkins, Chairman, for the opening of the 1967 Congressional session. Their agenda includes full compliance with all existing civil rights legislation, equality and justice in the courts, greater protection for those who exercise their civil rights, and an end to housing discrimination. Wilkins states that economic and social conditions must be created so that civil rights guaranteed by law can be realized.

The Future of Integration

Friday, August 21, 1959
Wisconsin (WI)

Dr. King discusses the various forms of segregation and the corresponding legislative acts that affect African Americans at the National Convention of the Fellowship of Reconciliation. King also provides details of how he hopes integration will take place.

Seventh Annual Gandhi Memorial Lecture

Sunday, November 6, 1966
Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), Chicago, IL

Howard University presents Dr. King as its primary speaker for their seventh annual Gandhi Memorial Lecture in 1966. Dr. King traces the slow but meaningful progress society has made from slavery to the current civil rights movement. However, he notes that the present challenges in achieving equality involve not only the silence of individuals of good will but also the conditons that keep the Negro inferior.

MLK's Address at the University of the West Indies

Sunday, June 20, 1965
JAMAICA

Dr. King spoke at the Valedictory Service of the University of the West Indies in Mona, Jamaica in 1965. On his topic "Facing the Challenge of a New Age," Dr. King addresses the international movement towards peace and equality, stating that "the wind of change is blowing all over the world."

The Task of Christian Leadership Training for Education in the Local Community

Atlantic City, NJ, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New Jersey (NJ)

This undated manuscript was used as the basis for a speech Dr. King gave at the National Sunday School and Baptist Training Union Congress in Atlantic City, New Jersey in 1944. Dr. King defines community, lists three current problems within the community and explains the role of Christian leaders and education in a community. Dr. King identifies the most pressing problems as the economy, divisions within Christianity and race relations.

MLK's Statement in Regards to Adlai Stevenson

Wednesday, July 14, 1965

Dr. King makes a statement following the death of Adlai Stevenson.

Let My People Vote

New York (NY), Alabama (AL), GEORGIA, South Carolina (SC), Florida (FL), Louisiana (LA), Virginia (VA)

Dr. King addresses the problem of voting that Negroes in America are encountering and also talks about SCOPE's upcoming initiatives.

Transcript of Press Conference on Hotel Restaurant Desegregation

Atlanta, GA

Dr. King states in this 1962 press conference that he sees integration of Atlanta hotels and restaurants as imminent. With the exception of Mississippi, Alabama, and South Carolina, civil rights are progressing throughout the South. The many groups working on the issue are working toward a common goal and using a variety of strategies, including direct action, litigation, legislation, and education.

Statement by MLK in San Francisco

Tuesday, May 26, 1964
Atlanta, GA, San Francisco, CA, Washington, D.C., California (CA)

Dr. King gives an address in San Francisco regarding race relations, equality, and segregation. Dr. King charges people from all communities to unite so that hope can be created for others.

MLK Addresses the National Association of Radio Announcers

Friday, August 11, 1967
Atlanta, GA

After returning from a Real Estate Brokers convention in San Francisco, Dr. King addresses the body of the National Association of Radio Announcers during their annual convention. The Reverend expresses appreciation for the influence radio has had in an unrepresented community of uneducated listeners who may otherwise be denied information and economic opportunity.

Senator Mark Hatfield Address on Vietnam

Thursday, March 16, 1967
Oregon (OR), VIETNAM, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, CHINA, FRANCE, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Geneva, Switzerland, BURMA / MYANMAR, ITALY, New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C., CANADA, SOUTH KOREA

In this address to the Harvard Young Republicans Club about the Vietnam War, Senator Mark O. Hatfield provides historical background on the conflict, defines the driving force of Ho Chi Minh as nationalism not Communism, and recounts the numerous times the U.S. has spurned overtures to negotiate a settlement. He proposes a political settlement after a suspension of bombing and de-escalation of the war. Hatfield first publicly opposed the Vietnam War as Governor of Oregon; he was the first prominent Republican to express opposition.

MLK's Weekend Itinerary

Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Selma, AL

This itinerary reflects Dr. King's schedule of speaking engagements at various churches and schools throughout Alabama.

Address Given by Vice President Nixon in Asheville, North Carolina

Wednesday, June 5, 1957
North Carolina (NC), POLAND, HUNGARY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This is the text of an address given by Vice President Richard Nixon before the sixty-sixth annual convention of the General Federation of Women's Club. He discusses the differences in countries dealing with Communism and America being a democracy.

Statement Issued from Harlem Hospital by MLK

Tuesday, September 30, 1958
New York, NY

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for the staff at Harlem Hospital and those who supported him during his stay at this location. He asserts that the telegrams, letters, calls and other means of contact have been accepted as a token of respect.

Draft of a Speech Regarding the Chicago Freedom Movement

Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, New York (NY)

This is a draft copy of Dr. King's speech on the Chicago Freedom Movement. The intention of this movement is to end slums in Chicago. Dr. King calls upon the poverty-stricken Negro, the middle class Negro, and the white community for assistance with this movement. Dr. King also states that years after the March on Washington, he has seen his dream turn into a nightmare due to the murders of civil rights activists.

The Dimensions of a Complete Life

Sunday, November 13, 1960
New York, NY, Iowa (IA), INDIA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Cambridge, MA

Dr. King's speech at Cornell University cites the new and complete city of God described in the Book of Revelation to propose that life at its best is complete in three dimensions. He states that a complete or three-dimensional life includes an inward concern for one's personal ends, an outward commitment to the welfare of others, and an upward connection with God.

SCLC President's Report - MLK

Wednesday, August 10, 1966
Jackson, MS, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Chicago, IL, South Carolina (SC), Florida (FL), Illinois (IL), Kentucky (KY), Tennessee (TN), Oregon (OR), Washington (WA), Texas (TX)

Delivered at the Tenth Annual Convention of the SCLC, Dr. King presents the annual report for the organization. King addresses several elements of the Civil Rights Movement as he discusses the successes, plans, goals, and vision of the SCLC in relation to the wider movement it represents.

A Challenge to the Churches and Synagogues

Dr. King expresses concern for the religious institutions of America. His concern is centered on the obligation that churches and synagogues have to advance civil rights and desegregation, while he goes on to reveal the parallels and connections between religion and society's values.

The Role of the Church

New York (NY), New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, INDIA, INDONESIA, GHANA, BRAZIL

Dr. King expresses how ineffective the Emancipation Proclamation has truly been on the Civil Rights Movement.

Press Statement by MLK About President Johnson's Address on Selma

Tuesday, March 16, 1965
Selma, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King lauds President Johnson's speech to a joint session of Congress, which he describes as an eloquent, unequivocal and passionate plea for human rights. This statement and the President's address occurred during the height of the Selma voting rights campaign.

Epitaph for a First Lady: Eleanor Roosevelt

New York (NY), Birmingham, AL, Boston, MA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Massachusetts (MA), Alabama (AL)

Upon the death of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, Dr. King wrote this epitaph, calling her "a symbol of world citizenship." In addition, Dr. King commends Mrs. Roosevelt for her commitment to humanity.

Speech to the Freedom Riders

Sunday, May 21, 1961
Montgomery, AL, New York (NY), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), GERMANY

King delivered this speech, in Montgomery, Alabama, in 1961, at a rally to support the Freedom Riders. King encourages them to maintain postures and attitudes of non-violence in the face of violent responses to their actions and resistance. He assures them that while they will experience a "season of suffering," the moral rightness of their cause will prevail.

Statement by MLK on Jailings

Thursday, May 9, 1963
Birmingham, AL

Dr. King states that there have been blatant violations of constitutional principles in the arresting of nonviolent protesters. He further states that those incarcerated have been subject to beatings.

Hungry Club Speech

Wednesday, May 10, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King speaks on "America's Chief Moral Dilemma." He contends that the dilemma in the world is the result of three major evils: racism, poverty, and war. Dr. King encourages the audience to work toward making America a moral example for the rest of the world.

Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech

Thursday, December 10, 1964
Oslo, Norway, NORWAY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Philadelphia, MS, Mississippi (MS), Montgomery, AL, South Africa, South Africa

This version of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech is typed in all capitals, probably to make it easier to read from while delivering the speech.