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"Speeches"

Unitarian Universalist Statement of Consensus on Racial Injustice

Friday, May 20, 1966

The Fifth General Assembly of the Unitarian Universalist Association listed several laws adopted by the association. Some of the laws incorporate civil rights, demonstrations, voting rights, equality, civil disobedience, and discrimination in employment and housing.

A Statement to the South and Nation

This seemingly unexceptional document signifies the birth of the SCLC. Dr. King, Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth and Rev. C. K. Steele assembled a consortium of leaders in Atlanta following the end of the Montgomery Bus Boycott. The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement that addresses the intimidation, discrimination and economic disparity Negroes face in the South. The statement appeals to the federal government to intervene against assaults that block basic civil rights.

MLK Address to the United Neighborhood Houses of New York

Tuesday, December 6, 1966

Dr. King delivers this address to the United Neighborhood Houses of New York. He expresses that a lack of job opportunities, education and community economic development contributes to the growing levels of poverty in the United States.

MLK Address at the University of Chicago

Thursday, January 27, 1966

Dr. King delivers this speech at the University of Chicago on January 27, 1966. He expounds upon the struggles of the Negro family in America, explaining the social and economic challenges the Negro faces along with the affects of slavery.

Statement from the Eisenhower Administration to the NAACP

Sunday, June 26, 1955

In an address to the NAACP, Vice President Richard Nixon discusses the reasons that progress has been made in the Eisenhower Administration and the goals that the organization needs to continue working toward.

Dr. Paul Arthur Scilpp Speech in Illinois

In this address delivered before the National Assembly for Progress in Equality of Opportunity in Housing, Dr. Paul Arthur Schilpp speaks about equality between races, "pure" race, and voting rights for Negroes.

Annual Address by MLK for the Montgomery Improvement Association

Thursday, December 3, 1959

This document outlines Dr. King's address for the Fourth Anniversary of the Montgomery Improvement Association, held at Bethel Baptist Church in Montgomery. In the address, Dr. King speaks about the history, achievements and current task of the Association.

Love and Forgiveness

Tuesday, May 5, 1964

This is a speech entitled "Love and Forgiveness" that Dr. King delivered at the American Baptist Convention meeting in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Jesus Christ and segregation serve as the major topics for this speech. Dr. King makes the compelling statements that "Jesus decided to meet hate with love," and that "segregation is still the Negro's burden and America's shame."

Statement to SCLC Board About Alabama Boycotts

Friday, April 2, 1965

In this statement, Dr. King explains the need for a boycott of the state of Alabama because of extreme violence and police overreaction, which he calls "totalitarian."

Vision of a World Made New

Thursday, September 9, 1954

This is a draft of "The Vision of a World Made New," a speech that Dr. King delivered during the 1954 Women's Auxiliary Convention. President Nannie H. Burroughs invited Dr. King to address the group's annual meeting where he condemned imperialism, colonialism, and segregation.

Statement on Penance for Violence in Albany, Georgia

Monday, July 30, 1962

Dr. King calls for a day of penance that will serve as a tactic of the self-purification step of the nonviolence method. Dr. King urges for the City Commission to talk with leaders of the Albany Movement.

The 105th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation-Rev. C.L. Fullwood

Rev. C.L. Fullwood drafts a sermon to commemorate the "105th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclimation for the Black People of America.:

Pathos and Hope

Dr. King writes about his trip to the Mississippi Delta. He reflects on the resolve and spirit of the people, who despite all odds are fighting for social justice and change.

Ghettos and Segregation in City Urbanizing

Dr. King writes this speech explaining the current economic and social conditions of city ghettos. As cities urbanize, ghettos expand and segregation increases. "The ghetto has become the hallmark of our major cities just as truly as the cities themselves are becoming the hallmark of the nation." Though the last thirty years has seen advancements in legislation, what remains unrecognized is the gap between legislation intent and the actualization of community programs that have tangible affects on the neighborhoods.

Founders Day Address

Dr. King addresses Spelman College at their Founders Day celebration. He discusses issues such as the Promised Land and the function of education.

MLK Address at NAACP 53rd Convention

Thursday, July 5, 1962

Dr. King delivered this address to the NAACP's 53rd Annual Convention held in Morehouse College's gymnasium in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King argues that it is imperative to debunk the perceived myths concerning segregation and discrimination in order to foster a society free of racial inequalities.

The Law and Civil Disobedience

Tuesday, August 23, 1960

Harris Wofford, a law professor and member of Senator John F. Kennedy's staff, discusses civil disobedience and its relationship to the law at the student association of Notre Dame Law School. He advocates in favor of civil disobedience using the theories of Thoreau, Socrates, Gandhi and others to support the need to break unjust laws. Dr. King pens handwritten questions on the top of this document pertaining to the changing of unjust laws in the courts.

Nobel Peace Prize Acceptance Speech Draft

This is a draft of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech. Handwritten notes are written in the margins to indicate future amendments. Dr. King states that he experiences this moment of acceptance for himself and "those magnificent devotees of nonviolence who have moved so courageously against the ramparts of racial injustice."

A Challenge to the Churches and Synagogues

Dr. King expresses concern for the religious institutions of America. His concern is centered on the obligation that churches and synagogues have to advance civil rights and desegregation, while he goes on to reveal the parallels and connections between religion and society's values.

Statement by MLK on Perjury Charges

Wednesday, February 17, 1960

Dr. King addresses his indictment for perjury supposedly related to improperly filed Alabama state tax returns. He points out that the tax auditor who assured him that his returns were accurate is the person bringing the charges. He proposes a group of distinguished citizens to review his books and report their findings and concludes by stating that his conscience is clear.

Address by MLK to Southern Association of Political Scientist

Friday, November 13, 1964

Dr. King addresses the issues of poverty, unemployment, education, health, and housing disparities within the nation. Granted, many strides have been made but there is still more work to be done. Equality has still not come full circle in regards to these social issues. Dr. King urges the people to continue the fight of social justice in all aspects of inequality.

Press Conference on the Chicago Movement

Wednesday, July 7, 1965

Dr. King and SCLC members have accepted the invitation to join the fight for a quality integrated education for the children of Chicago.

Draft of Statement "Vote No on State Question 409" by MLK

In this draft of a statement, Dr. King discusses the misnomer of 'right-to-work,' stating that the law is against Civil Rights as it is anti-union.

Statement on SCLC Commitment to Albany, Georgia

Thursday, July 12, 1962

Dr. King announces that he is organizing an operation in Albany, Georgia in which the members of the SCLC will be present and active.

Statement on The Negro's Political and Economic Power

Friday, October 14, 1966

Dr. King discusses the inferior political and economic power of the American Negro against the backdrop of emerging Black Power organizations. He reveals several new non-violent programs the SCLC targeted at economic and social justice: youth training and political reformation in the South. It is in accordance with the philosophy of non-violence that Dr. King believes the vast majority of Negroes will birth a "community in which neither power nor dignity will be black or white."

Martin Luther King Does It Again

Sunday, April 23, 1967

Ralph C. Bailey, a marcher in the New York City demonstration against the War in Vietnam, describes the demonstration as an "impressive spectacle" of people of all ages and races. He praises Dr. King for combining revolution with nonviolence in hopes of a peaceful demonstration.

Draft of Statement by MLK on his Involvement With the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers

Dr. King wishes to clarify his endorsement of the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers. He states that he did not mean to imply that there was a civil rights issue in the "collective bargaining election," but rather that he admires the accomplishments of the labor movement.

Jenner School Parents

Wednesday, April 20, 1966

Presented here is a rough draft of an address delivered by Dr. King to the parents of Jenner Elementary school located in Chicago, Ill. Dr. King advises a plan to counteract deplorable school conditions as well as the misappropriation of tax dollars.

MLK on the Republican Nomination of Barry Goldwater

Thursday, July 16, 1964

Dr. King issued this statement regarding the "unfortunate and disastrous" Republican Party's nomination of Senator Barry Goldwater for the Presidency of the United States. The Reverend expounds on his disapproval of the nomination by stating that he represents an unrealistic conservation that is totally out of touch with the realities of the twentieth century.

Statement Before the National Democratic Platform and Resolutions Committee

Saturday, August 11, 1956

Dr. King addresses the National Democratic Platform and Resolutions Committee on the issues of civil rights, segregation, and voters registration. He urges the party to join the crusade for social justice and equality for all.