Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Speeches"

SCLC Press Release About Telegram to Robert Kennedy

Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Greenwood, MS

The SCLC issues a press release, which discloses the text of telegram from Dr. King to Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy.

Address to AFL-CIO New York City District 65

New York (NY), Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Los Angeles, CA, California (CA)

Dr. King speaks to the District 65 AFL-CIO to address the importance of job opportunities in the northern and southern regions of the United States. He explains that the labor movement must stay active in order to gain civil rights and equal pay for African American workers.

Movement for Puerto Rican Independence

VIETNAM, PHILIPPINES, CUBA, PUERTO RICO, NICARAGUA, CONGO / ZAIRE, SOUTH KOREA

Pedro Juan Rua, a leader in the Movement for Puerto Rican Independence, gives a speech concerning the American military presence in Vietnam. He provides a historical framework for understanding America's involvement with other oppressed nations, asserting "U.S. rulers are new Nazis. Unite to defeat them."

Public Statement at the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party

Wednesday, July 22, 1964
Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King speaks at a rally held for the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. Dr. King stresses the importance of government assistance in protecting African Americans citizens from violent actions when registering and voting during elections. In areas such as Mississippi where harassment and murders took place frequently, African Americans were in dire need of a political party that was free of racism so that they could fairly be represented in a prejudice society.

MLK Address to Southern Association of Political Scientists

Friday, November 13, 1964
Birmingham, AL, Jackson, MS, New York, NY, Maryland (MD), San Francisco, CA, Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King addresses the Southern Association of Political Scientists in November of 1964. This address consists of the accomplishments made because of the Civil Rights Movement and areas that society needs to improve upon.

MLK Statement Regarding the Non-Partisan Position of the SCLC

Tuesday, November 1, 1960
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

While keeping the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's position as a non-partisan organization, Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Senator Kennedy's concern for his arrest.

Speech to the Freedom Riders

Sunday, May 21, 1961
Montgomery, AL, New York (NY), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), GERMANY

King delivered this speech, in Montgomery, Alabama, in 1961, at a rally to support the Freedom Riders. King encourages them to maintain postures and attitudes of non-violence in the face of violent responses to their actions and resistance. He assures them that while they will experience a "season of suffering," the moral rightness of their cause will prevail.

Last Page of Riverside Speech

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

This document is the last page of Dr. King's Riverside Speech, the only page of this version of the speech in the collection. The speech ends with a quotation from James Russell Lowell's "Once to Every Nation."

March on Washington Address by Eugene Carson Blake

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C., Illinois (IL), Virginia (VA)

Rev Dr. Eugene Carson Blake, Vice Chairman of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches, addresses the March on Washington. He states that if all the clergy and church members he represents and all of the Roman Catholics and Jews in America were marching for jobs and freedom for Negroes, the battle for civil rights would be won. Despite the pronouncements of the religious community, the churches and society are still segregated. “Late, late we come,” he says, and in a repentant and reconciling spirit.

Statement from the Eisenhower Administration to the NAACP

Sunday, June 26, 1955
New Jersey (NJ), Atlantic City, NJ, Washington, D.C.

In an address to the NAACP, Vice President Richard Nixon discusses the reasons that progress has been made in the Eisenhower Administration and the goals that the organization needs to continue working toward.

Statement to Be Used If There is a Victory for Reagan

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), Maryland (MD)

SCLC prepares a contingency statement, with Dr. King's handwritten edits. The statement asserts that some elections' newly overt racism reflects the prejudice and bigotry in America. The statement calls on Negroes to collaborate with honest white allies to gain legal and moral rights.

Seventh Annual Gandhi Memorial Lecture

Sunday, November 6, 1966
Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), Chicago, IL

Howard University presents Dr. King as its primary speaker for their seventh annual Gandhi Memorial Lecture in 1966. Dr. King traces the slow but meaningful progress society has made from slavery to the current civil rights movement. However, he notes that the present challenges in achieving equality involve not only the silence of individuals of good will but also the conditons that keep the Negro inferior.

Non-Violent Procedures to Inter-Racial Harmony

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King proclaims that race relations is a crisis that has existed for many years in America. As a result of unjust race relations, Negroes have embarked upon the current fight for equal rights.

Text of Speech Delivered at Lincoln Memorial

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C.

This speech, given by Dr. King at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C, brings attention to the current state of oppression of Negro men and women in 1963.

Statement by MLK

Friday, December 11, 1964
Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA

This document contains Dr. King's remarks on injustices in the state of Mississippi. He suggests a complete boycott if the federal or state government is unable to perform the proper means of justice.

MLK at the Jefferson County Armory

Tuesday, August 23, 1960
Louisville, KY

In this outline, Dr. King discusses voting and the importance of citizenship. One of the important points, in Dr. King's outline, states: "Political Parties Must Deliver on Their Promises."

MLK Statement Before the Credentials Committee of the DNC

Saturday, August 22, 1964
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), SOUTH AFRICA, CUBA

Dr. King addresses the Democratic National Committee urging them to stand up against the inequities that prevent Negro participation in the political process in the state of Mississippi.

MLK Speech at Nobel Peace Prize Recognition Dinner

Wednesday, January 27, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Los Angeles, CA, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King delivers this address after returning from his trip to Oslo, Norway. A recognition dinner is held in his hometown of Atlanta, Georgia as an honor for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. King thanks supporters, family, and friends, however, accepts the award on behalf of the many people struggling for justice and civil rights. He states that oppressed people can only stay oppressed for so long because "the yearning for freedom eventually manifests itself."

MLK Press Statement Regarding Riots in Los Angeles

Friday, August 20, 1965
Los Angeles, CA

In this statement to the press, Dr. King comments on the Watts Riots that took place in Los Angeles, California. He further discusses the economic, social and racial inequalities that he feels were the cause of the violence.

Statement Issued from Harlem Hospital by MLK

Tuesday, September 30, 1958
New York, NY

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for the staff at Harlem Hospital and those who supported him during his stay at this location. He asserts that the telegrams, letters, calls and other means of contact have been accepted as a token of respect.

MLK Statement on Voter Registration

Dr. King urges the African American community to register and vote. He outlines the importance of voting by making historcial references relevant to the community.

Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution

Sunday, August 1, 1965
INDIA, CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Selma, AL, Birmingham, AL

Dr. King delivers the commencement address at Oberlin College in Ohio on June 14, 1965. Nothing is more tragic, he says, than sleeping through a significant period of social change by failing to adopt the new mental attitudes that the new situation demands. He suggests that to remain awake through a great revolution one must embrace a global perspective and work for peace, racial justice, economic justice and brotherhood throughout the world.

MLK Statement before Platform Committee of the RNC

Tuesday, July 7, 1964
San Francisco, CA, Chicago, IL, Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, Virginia (VA), Jackson, MS, New York (NY), New York, NY, Maryland (MD), SOUTH KOREA, VIETNAM, GERMANY, Berlin, Germany, CUBA, Louisiana (LA)

Dr. King lists the steps towards equality that have taken place all over the nation and he addresses the passage of the Civil Rights Bill. Dr. King explains what still needs to be done in order to make America truly the land of the free.

The Real Poverty

Sunday, December 4, 1966
Alabama (AL)

SCLC Director of Public Relations Junius Griffin announces the opening of the Anti-Poverty Coordinating Committee of the Wilcox County, Alabama branch of the SCLC. Throughout the speech, he asserts that true poverty is a "man without compassion," and that any person who does not know how to help others is worse off than "our ancestors who were slaves."

Thoughts on Nobel Prize

Birmingham, AL, New York (NY), California (CA), Florida (FL), Philadelphia, PA, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

This draft of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech lends recognition to the nonviolent practices of those engaged in the fight for equality and civil rights.

Press Internationale Concludes Fifth Year of Broadcasting Over WBKB-TV

Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, GERMANY, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, INDIA, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC, CHINA, UNITED KINGDOM, London, England, LUXEMBOURG, FRANCE

Le Van Enterprises, Inc. announces that Press Internationale,a television show that provides analysis of international issues, has completed five years of weekly broadcasting in Chicago.

Keynote Address Introduction for Sidney Poitier

Monday, August 14, 1967
Florida (FL), Maine (ME), New York (NY), California (CA)

At the Tenth Annual Convention of the SCLC, Dr. King delivers this introduction of guest speaker, Sidney Poitier. Andrew Young further praises Mr. Poitier for informing the black community that one should be "proud to be black" because "black is beautiful."

MLK Public Statement on the Poor People's Campaign

Monday, December 4, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Mississippi (MS), Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King announces several initiatives of the SCLC. He explains that due to severe displays of discrimination the SCLC and other organizations will continue the non-violent movement with a demonstration in Washington, D.C. Dr. King further paints the picture of inequality among the races by providing several illustrations of discrimination.

Address by Jackie Robinson at SCLC Freedom Dinner

Tuesday, September 25, 1962
Albany, GA, Birmingham, AL, New York (NY), New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), ITALY, CANADA

Guest speaker Jackie Robinson discusses his personal struggles with adopting the philosophy of nonviolence, race relations and the far-reaching efforts of the SCLC.

Why We Chose Jail Rather than Bail

Dr. King cites seven reasons for choosing jail not bail. Among them is that ?the highest expression of nonviolence is self suffering.?