The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:

The Task of Christian Leadership Training for Education in the Local Community

Atlantic City, NJ, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New Jersey (NJ)

This undated manuscript was used as the basis for a speech Dr. King gave at the National Sunday School and Baptist Training Union Congress in Atlantic City, New Jersey in 1944. Dr. King defines community, lists three current problems within the community and explains the role of Christian leaders and education in a community. Dr. King identifies the most pressing problems as the economy, divisions within Christianity and race relations.

People to People

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Cleveland, OH, Ohio (OH), Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Washington, D.C., Albany, GA, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, Florida (FL), St. Augustine, FL, Georgia (GA), Virginia (VA)

Dr. King announces the SCLC's launching of a People to People tour of four northern cities. The SCLC launched this tour in the north to display a concern for the "moral welfare of Northern Negroes."

The Kinship Between the Labor Unions and Negroes

Dr. King presents a speech at the United Auto Workers Convention in May 1961, which acknowledges the new challenges faced by factory workers because of technological advances that threaten to leave them jobless. He draws a parallel between the plight of auto workers and the Negro experiences of disenfranchisement in the US to highlight the potential for alliance between the two groups.

The Montgomery Story

Wednesday, June 27, 1956
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, California (CA), San Francisco, CA, Massachusetts (MA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, INDIA, UNITED KINGDOM

Dr. King delivers an address entitled the "Montgomery Story" at the NAACP 47th Annual Convention. He address several issues throughout the address including: segregation, civil rights, equality, slavery and religion.

Address Given by Vice President Nixon in Asheville, North Carolina

Wednesday, June 5, 1957

This is the text of an address given by Vice President Richard Nixon before the sixty-sixth annual convention of the General Federation of Women's Club. He discusses the differences in countries dealing with Communism and America being a democracy.

Inauguration Response by J. Lynwood Gresham

Friday, November 10, 1967

This document is the inauguration response delivered by Dr. J. Lynwood Gresham of Barber-Scotia College.

Speech at NAACP World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

Thursday, May 28, 1964

Dr. King links the quest for individual civil rights to the global struggle for human rights and states that the nation that will achieve preeminence in the world is the one that both guarantees human rights for all and provides for basic needs.

March on Washington Address by Eugene Carson Blake

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C., Illinois (IL), Virginia (VA)

Rev Dr. Eugene Carson Blake, Vice Chairman of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches, addresses the March on Washington. He states that if all the clergy and church members he represents and all of the Roman Catholics and Jews in America were marching for jobs and freedom for Negroes, the battle for civil rights would be won. Despite the pronouncements of the religious community, the churches and society are still segregated. “Late, late we come,” he says, and in a repentant and reconciling spirit.

Statement by MLK in San Francisco

Tuesday, May 26, 1964
Atlanta, GA, San Francisco, CA, Washington, D.C., California (CA)

Dr. King gives an address in San Francisco regarding race relations, equality, and segregation. Dr. King charges people from all communities to unite so that hope can be created for others.

MLK Interview on NBC's Meet the Press

Sunday, March 28, 1965
Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL

This edition of NBC's Meet the Press featured Dr. King for a discussion concerning the Civil Rights Movement and its demonstrations. The interview was moderated by Ned Brooks and the panel featured John Chancellor, James J. Kilpatrick, Tom Wicker and Lawrence E. Spivak.

America's Chief Moral Dilemma

Wednesday, May 10, 1967

Dr. King's address to the Hungry Club highlights an array of issues that relate to America's "Moral Dilemma." Dr. King explains the three major evil dilemmas that face the nation: war, poverty, and racism.

Birmingham Desegregation Settlement Agreement

Friday, May 10, 1963
Birmingham, AL

Dr. King reviews the settlement made between the City of Birmingham and civil rights protesters. This agreement includes the integration of lunch counters, sitting rooms, restrooms, and water fountains within ninety days.

The Real Poverty

Sunday, December 4, 1966
Alabama (AL)

SCLC Director of Public Relations Junius Griffin announces the opening of the Anti-Poverty Coordinating Committee of the Wilcox County, Alabama branch of the SCLC. Throughout the speech, he asserts that true poverty is a "man without compassion," and that any person who does not know how to help others is worse off than "our ancestors who were slaves."

Draft of Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech

This document is one draft of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech. Dr. King applauds the world for recognizing the American Civil Rights Movement and states that this award represents for him a "deepening commitment" to the philosophy of nonviolence.

Dr. Paul Arthur Scilpp Speech in Illinois

Illinois (IL), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL

In this address delivered before the National Assembly for Progress in Equality of Opportunity in Housing, Dr. Paul Arthur Schilpp speaks about equality between races, "pure" race, and voting rights for Negroes.

MLK Address at Mass Meeting in Eutaw, Alabama

Wednesday, March 20, 1968
Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, South Carolina (SC), Richmond, VA, North Carolina (NC), Georgia (GA), Virginia (VA), Boston, MA, New York, NY, New York (NY), Cleveland, OH, Pittsburgh, PA, Baltimore, MD, Milwaukee, WI, Philadelphia, PA, Chicago, IL, Utah (UT), Los Angeles, CA

Dr. King challenges the Negro residents of Eutaw, Alabama to participate in the upcoming SCLC Poor People's Campaign. In this address, he urges the citizens of Eutaw to occupy Washington, D.C. in an effort to press Congress for a redistribution of wealth in America. He urges, "All ye who are tired of segregation and discrimination, come unto us. All ye who are overworked and underpaid, come unto us."

MLK Addresses the National Association of Radio Announcers

Friday, August 11, 1967
Atlanta, GA

After returning from a Real Estate Brokers convention in San Francisco, Dr. King addresses the body of the National Association of Radio Announcers during their annual convention. The Reverend expresses appreciation for the influence radio has had in an unrepresented community of uneducated listeners who may otherwise be denied information and economic opportunity.

Address Given by Vice President Nixon in Chicago, Illinois

Tuesday, April 30, 1957

This document contains the text of an address given by Vice President Richard Nixon at the Joint Defense Appeal of the American Jewish Committee and the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith. He expresses what can be done and what laws should be passed to make sure others are not further abused.

MLK's Statement in Regards to Adlai Stevenson

Wednesday, July 14, 1965

Dr. King makes a statement following the death of Adlai Stevenson.

Senate Subcommittee on Urban Reorganization Statement

Thursday, December 15, 1966

In a hearing on the plight of inner cities, Dr. King focuses on injustices in the urban ghettoes, stating that the problem is not primarily a race issue but an economic one. He calls for a rebalancing of national priorities and links the plight of America's poor to the squandering of resources on war.

Hungry Club Speech

Wednesday, May 10, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King speaks on "America's Chief Moral Dilemma." He contends that the dilemma in the world is the result of three major evils: racism, poverty, and war. Dr. King encourages the audience to work toward making America a moral example for the rest of the world.

The Domestic Impact of the War in America

Saturday, November 11, 1967
VIETNAM, CHINA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., San Francisco, CA

In his address to the National Labor Leadership Assembly for Peace, Dr. King parallels the war in Vietnam to the injustice and violence inflicted on urban dwelling American Negroes "goaded and infuriated by discrimination and neglect." King implores Congress and the Johnson Administration to reassess the nation's domestic priorities and institute anti-poverty programs, so that the Great Society does not deteriorate into a "troubled and confused society."

MLK Statement before Platform Committee of the RNC

Tuesday, July 7, 1964
San Francisco, CA, Chicago, IL, Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, Virginia (VA), Jackson, MS, New York (NY), New York, NY, Maryland (MD), SOUTH KOREA, VIETNAM, GERMANY, Berlin, Germany, CUBA, Louisiana (LA)

Dr. King lists the steps towards equality that have taken place all over the nation and he addresses the passage of the Civil Rights Bill. Dr. King explains what still needs to be done in order to make America truly the land of the free.

MLK's Address to American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa

Saturday, November 24, 1962
New York (NY), South Africa

Drawing connections between the social injustices of two continents, Dr. King discusses the relationship between segregation in America and colonialism in Africa. Dr. King also shares his opinion about America dominating Africa politically and economically.

The Wind of Change is Blowing

Wednesday, June 27, 1962
South Africa, CANADA, Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), London, England, GHANA, South Carolina (SC), Mississippi (MS), LIBERIA, ETHIOPIA

Dr. King addresses the positive changes that have taken place across the world and how they should continue to occur until equality is reached.

Speech from MLK about Jews Living in the Soviet Union


In this document, Dr. King protests the Soviet Union's treatment of the Jews there. He stresses the need for the Soviet Union to treat its Jewish community fairly. He says: "[w]e cannot sit complacently by the wayside while while our Jewish brothers in the Soviet Union face the possible extinction of their cultural and spiritual life."

Statement from MLK Returning from Receiving Nobel Prize

Friday, December 18, 1964
New York, NY

Upon returning from receiving the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King issued this statement on segregation, calling it "nothing but a new form of slavery."

MLK Statement at Peace Event in Geneva

Monday, May 29, 1967
Geneva, Switzerland, THAILAND, VIETNAM

Dr. King delivered this statement in Geneva at the Pacem In Terris ("Peace on Earth") II Convocation about the "costly, bloody and futile war in Vietnam."

Oberlin College Commencement

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., PUERTO RICO, VIETNAM, INDIA, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), New Hampshire (NH)

This issue of the Oberlin Alumni Magazine features commencement articles and photos as well as Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution, Dr. King’s address to the graduating class.

The Dimensions of a Complete Life

Sunday, November 13, 1960

Dr. King's speech at Cornell University cites the new and complete city of God described in the Book of Revelation to propose that life at its best is complete in three dimensions. He states that a complete or three-dimensional life includes an inward concern for one's personal ends, an outward commitment to the welfare of others, and an upward connection with God.