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"Speeches"

Statement From MLK In Response To Article Alleging Communist Ties

Thursday, July 25, 1963
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

This press release issued by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference features a Statement by Dr. King responding to allegations that he and the SCLC has communist ties. Dr. King argues that the SCLC is grounded in the Christian non-violent movement with the intent of reform, wherease communism leads to violent revolution.

Address Given by Vice President Nixon in Asheville, North Carolina

Wednesday, June 5, 1957
North Carolina (NC), POLAND, HUNGARY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This is the text of an address given by Vice President Richard Nixon before the sixty-sixth annual convention of the General Federation of Women's Club. He discusses the differences in countries dealing with Communism and America being a democracy.

MLK's Annual Report to SCLC Convention

Friday, October 2, 1964
Georgia (GA), San Francisco, CA, Mississippi (MS), EGYPT, Montgomery, AL, Albany, GA, St. Augustine, FL, Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA, North Carolina (NC)

As President of the SCLC, Dr. King delivers his Annual Report to the Eighth Annual Convention in Savannah, Georgia. In addition to listing SCLC's many accomplishments over the past year, Dr. King urges his audience to stay resolute as their great progress creates a growing racial backlash from those opposed to the Civil Rights Movement.

Address by MLK to the National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962
Washington, D.C., Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

During an address to the National Press Club in Washington, Dr. King declares the time for racial justice has arrived.

Address Before the United Packinghouse Workers of America

At their Thirteenth Constitutional Convention in Minneapolis on May 21, 1962, Dr. King praises the United Packinghouse Workers Union of America for their dedication to civil rights. He states that the civil rights and labor movements share in common a concern for minimum wages, social security, health benefits, decent housing, job security and retirement security. He thanks them for the aid that they have provided and encourages them to continue fighting for equality.

Statement by MLK

Friday, October 14, 1966
Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Chicago, IL

In this statement, Dr. King enforces the mission and organizational structure of the SCLC as a means of denouncing the traditional ideas associated with the "Black Power" slogan.

Pathos and Hope

Saturday, March 3, 1962
New York (NY), New York, NY, Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Cleveland, OH

Dr. King speaks about a trip to the Mississippi Delta where he first witnessed hope and pathos simultaneously.

Another Opinion: I Oppose the War in Vietnam

VIETNAM, Baltimore, MD, Chicago, IL

This column contains excerpts from an address given by Dr. King in Chicago, in which he expresses his concerns regarding the Vietnam War and how it will affect poverty in America.

Statement Issued from Harlem Hospital by MLK

Tuesday, September 30, 1958
New York, NY

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for the staff at Harlem Hospital and those who supported him during his stay at this location. He asserts that the telegrams, letters, calls and other means of contact have been accepted as a token of respect.

MLK's Weekend Itinerary

Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Selma, AL

This itinerary reflects Dr. King's schedule of speaking engagements at various churches and schools throughout Alabama.

MLK Address to the United Neighborhood Houses of New York

Tuesday, December 6, 1966
New York, NY, New York (NY), VIETNAM

Dr. King delivers this address to the United Neighborhood Houses of New York. He expresses that a lack of job opportunities, education and community economic development contributes to the growing levels of poverty in the United States.

"Dr. King Denounces Write-In Plot"

Monday, November 2, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Contrary to what radio announcements and newspapers advertise, Dr. King urges Negro voters to vote for a presidential candidate that is already on the ballot. He expresses that he is not a candidate and does not want voters to write his name on the ballot.

MLK Speaks to People of Watts

Thursday, August 19, 1965
California (CA), Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Los Angeles, CA

Dr. King speaks on what it will take to make Los Angeles a better city.

The Christian Way of Life in Human Relations

Wednesday, December 4, 1957
Little Rock, AR, Atlanta, GA, Montgomery, AL, Arkansas (AR), Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Missouri (MO)

Dr. King makes a speech to the National Council of Churches regarding the issue of American race relations. After school integration ... has noticed a radical change in the attitudes of African-Americans, ultimately giving birth to this mental and figurative notion of the "new Negro". He solicits the assistance and leadership of the nation's churches to take a firm stand against the rampant inequalities afflicting blacks are facing in America.

The Casualties of The War In Vietnam

Saturday, February 25, 1967
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, SOUTH AFRICA

Dr. King speaks on behalf of the United States presence in Vietnam at a symposium held in Los Angeles, California. He addresses the moral, social, and political causalities that arise as result of war. Moreover, he urges the powers that be to allocate resources for good and rather than evil.

MLK Statement at Peace Event in Geneva

Monday, May 29, 1967
Geneva, Switzerland, THAILAND, VIETNAM

Dr. King delivered this statement in Geneva at the Pacem In Terris ("Peace on Earth") II Convocation about the "costly, bloody and futile war in Vietnam."

MLK Discusses Plans for the 1963 March on Washington

Wednesday, January 23, 1963
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Washington, D.C.

While in Detroit, Michigan, Dr. King discloses his intentions for the upcoming March on Washington.

Address at a Conference of Religious Leaders Under the Sponsorship of the President's Committee on Government Contracts

Monday, May 11, 1959
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King addresses a delegation of religious leaders at a conference hosted by the President's Committee on Government Contracts. In this pivotal speech, Dr. King outlines the responsibilites of clergymen and government officials in combating poverty and economic discrimination. He stresses the need for lay leaders and representatives of government to bodly speak out against the vestiges of discrimination that continuously hinder the economic and social progress of Negroes in America.

MKL At Zoin Hill - "The Ballot"

Tuesday, July 17, 1962

This transcript of a passionate, poetic, and inspiring speech touches on many of King's motifs. It starts with an appeal for voting rights, addresses the despair the audience feels from time to time, and ends with a refrain of "we shall overcome."

School Desegregation 10 Years Later

Thursday, May 7, 1964
Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA, Indiana (IN)

Dr. King says that there have been few strides made in school desegregation. He says that schools that comply with the desegregation laws do it at an appalling slow pace. Lastly, he says that although there needs to be more progress in both the north and the south, he has hope for the future.

Draft Speech for Atlanta Nobel Peace Prize Reception

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Los Angeles, CA

Dr. King drafts a speech that he will make in Atlanta for the reception honoring his Nobel Peace Prize winning. In the speech he offers his gratitude to friends and family who supported him in his efforts. Dr. King also briefly discusses the issue of racial injustice and the continued fight for equality.

Epitaph for a First Lady: Eleanor Roosevelt

Saturday, November 24, 1962
New York (NY), Birmingham, AL, Boston, MA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. Kings writes an epitaph discussing Eleanor Roosevelt and what she stood for.

Statement Before The Credentials Committee

Saturday, August 22, 1964
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), SOUTH AFRICA, CUBA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King makes a statement to the Democratic National Committee in an effort to persuade the the organization to recognize the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party as a sitting, and voting, entity of the Democratic Party. Dr. King emphasizes that not only is the fabric of the Democratic National Party at stake, but representative government as it is known throughout the world.

Nobel Peace Prize Acceptance Speech Draft

Thursday, December 10, 1964
Philadelphia, MS, Montgomery, AL, Oslo, Norway, Mississippi (MS), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL)

In 1964, Dr. King became the first African-American to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. At age 35, he was also the youngest recipient of the award to date. Emphasizing a philosophy of nonviolence, Dr. King writes this acceptance speech commemorating the courageous work of the Civil Rights Movement. He highlights the brutality faced throughout the United States and addresses the irony of accepting a peace prize on behalf of a movement that has yet to obtain peace.

Draft of MLK's Public Statement Concerning SCLC Supporting Communism

New York, NY, Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King addresses the accusation in the New York Herald Tribune that some SCLC members support Communism. He also states that the SCLC has severed ties with former member Jack O'Dell, including the fundraising that had taken place in New York.

Freedom Festival Speech on Chicago Campaign

Chicago, IL, Detroit, MI, New York (NY), Los Angeles, CA, CONGO / ZAIRE, BELGIUM, Mississippi (MS), Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

At the Freedom Festival a speech was made in regards to the Chicago Campaign. The campaign focuses on the urban renewal of the area. Specifically, it discusses the unemployment rate and housing conditions of African-Americans.

Statement by MLK on Segregation

Thursday, July 11, 1963
North Carolina (NC), Birmingham, AL

In this statement from Dr. King on segregation, he argues that it is "nothing but a new form of slavery."

Address by Rabbi Joachim Prinz

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C., GERMANY

Rabbi Joachim Prinz's address at the March on Washington focuses on the importance of freedom. He relates the struggle that blacks are currently enduring to the Nazism Jews faced during the reign of Hitler.

A Statement to the South and Nation

Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Georgia (GA), HUNGARY, South Africa

This seemingly unexceptional document signifies the birth of the SCLC. Dr. King, Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth and Rev. C. K. Steele assembled a consortium of leaders in Atlanta following the end of the Montgomery Bus Boycott. The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement that addresses the intimidation, discrimination and economic disparity Negroes face in the South. The statement appeals to the federal government to intervene against assaults that block basic civil rights.

Address by Jackie Robinson at SCLC Freedom Dinner

Tuesday, September 25, 1962
Albany, GA, Birmingham, AL, New York (NY), New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), ITALY, CANADA

Guest speaker Jackie Robinson discusses his personal struggles with adopting the philosophy of nonviolence, race relations and the far-reaching efforts of the SCLC.