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"Speeches"

MLK's Remarks on Conference with the President

Monday, June 23, 1958
New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King provides the perspective he shared at a meeting held by the President with leaders from the white and Negro community discussing civil rights. His speech includes several steps to reach equality across the US.

Statement by MLK

Friday, October 14, 1966
Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Chicago, IL

In this statement, Dr. King enforces the mission and organizational structure of the SCLC as a means of denouncing the traditional ideas associated with the "Black Power" slogan.

MLK's Statement on Church Bombing in Leesburg, GA

Wednesday, August 15, 1962
Georgia (GA)

MLK expresses his clear disgust with the actions of the civil rights resisters, denouncing their bombing of a local church.

MLK Statement Before the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders

Monday, October 23, 1967
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM, INDIA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, North Carolina (NC)

Dr. King makes a public statement before the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorder. He addresses five causes of the recent riots: hite backlash, unemployment, discriminatory practices, war, and features peculiar to big cities.

I've Been To The Mountaintop

Wednesday, April 3, 1968
Memphis, TN, EGYPT, GREECE, Johannesburg, South Africa, KENYA, GHANA, New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Jackson, MS, Birmingham, AL, CHINA, Philadelphia, PA, Los Angeles, CA, GERMANY, Albany, GA, Tennessee (TN), New York (NY), Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, Pennsylvania (PA), California (CA), UNITED KINGDOM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CANADA, Los Angeles, CA, South Africa

Dr. King delivers the "I've Been to the Mountaintop" speech at the Masonic Temple in Memphis, TN.

Press Conference on Chicago Movement

Wednesday, July 7, 1965
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King shares his acceptance of the invitation to spend some time in Chicago. During his time in Chicago, Dr. King and other SCLC leaders plan to assist local civil rights organizations in organizing rallies throughout the city.

Thoughts on Nobel Prize

Dr. King uses a statement by Mahalia Jackson and the philanthropy of Sir Alfred Nobel to encapsulate the purpose of the Civil Rights Movement. Jackson refers to the racial problems in America as "family business," but Dr. King believes that in order for man to become a brotherhood, society has to search for truth like Alfred Nobel.

Dr. Paul Arthur Scilpp Speech in Illinois

Illinois (IL), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL

In this address delivered before the National Assembly for Progress in Equality of Opportunity in Housing, Dr. Paul Arthur Schilpp speaks about equality between races, "pure" race, and voting rights for Negroes.

Pilgrimage for Democracy

Sunday, December 15, 1963

Dr. King makes an address at the "Pilgrimage for Democracy" in Atlanta during the winter of 1963. He opens with the Supreme Courts ruling to cease segregation in schools and how Atlanta served as the "epitome of social progress." He continues to elaborate on how the city needs to continue its desegregation efforts to achieve justice. Dr. King numerically highlights the inadequacies of the integrated schools in Atlanta and expresses the reality of the continuing segregation in the city's public accommodations.

Joint Statement on Violence in the Cities

Wednesday, July 26, 1967
Detroit, MI, Atlanta, GA, New Jersey (NJ), Georgia (GA), Michigan (MI), New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King, A. Philip Randolph, Whitney M. Young Jr., and Roy Wilkins issue a joint statement urging Negro Americans in cities such as Newark and Detroit to end the public disorder and rioting. The civil rights leaders emphasize the potential damage the urban riots pose to "the Negro population, to the civil rights cause, and to the entire nation."

The Crisis in America's Cities

Tuesday, August 15, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL

Dr. King provides an analysis of "social disorder" and a plan of action against poverty, discrimination and racism in Urban America. Dr. King states that, "If the soul is left in darkness, sins will be committed."

SCLC Press Release About Telegram to Robert Kennedy

Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Greenwood, MS

The SCLC issues a press release, which discloses the text of telegram from Dr. King to Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy.

MLK's Statement at Prayer Rally in Albany, Georgia

Wednesday, August 15, 1962
Albany, GA

After the bombing of a local church, Dr. King delivered this statement attempting to both criticize the actions of the perpetrators and provide a sense of calm to Albany demonstrators.

MLK's Public Statement Regarding Julian Bond

Tuesday, January 12, 1965
Georgia (GA)

Dr. King expresses his indignation for the State Legislatures refusal to seat Representative-Elect Julian Bond. Dr. King asserts that there are obvious racial overtones in the State Legislatures decisions since Mr. Bond received 82 percent of the votes in his district. Dr. King will commence direct action due to the state of urgency.

Draft of Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech

This document is one draft of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech. Dr. King applauds the world for recognizing the American Civil Rights Movement and states that this award represents for him a "deepening commitment" to the philosophy of nonviolence.

Tonight Show Appearance Press Release

Wednesday, January 31, 1968
Washington, D.C.

The SCLC announces that Dr. King will appear on the Tonight Show with Harry Belafonte filling in for Johnny Carson as host. Comedian Nipsey Russell and actor Paul Newman, both active in the civil rights movement, will also be guests. Dr. King looks forward to this opportunity to speak about the upcoming Poor People?s Campaign.

Why We Chose Jail Rather than Bail

Dr. King cites seven reasons for choosing jail not bail. Among them is that ?the highest expression of nonviolence is self suffering.?

MLK at the Jefferson County Armory

Tuesday, August 23, 1960
Louisville, KY

In this outline, Dr. King discusses voting and the importance of citizenship. One of the important points, in Dr. King's outline, states: "Political Parties Must Deliver on Their Promises."

A Look to the Future

Monday, September 2, 1957
Tennessee (TN), Montgomery, AL

Dr. King addresses the Highlander Folk School during the organization's twenty-fifth anniversary. He discusses the many accomplishments and hurdles of the Civil Rights Movement.

MLK's Address to American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa

Saturday, November 24, 1962
New York (NY), South Africa

Drawing connections between the social injustices of two continents, Dr. King discusses the relationship between segregation in America and colonialism in Africa. Dr. King also shares his opinion about America dominating Africa politically and economically.

MLK's Statement in Regards to Adlai Stevenson

Wednesday, July 14, 1965

Dr. King makes a statement following the death of Adlai Stevenson.

MLK Addresses the National Association of Radio Announcers

Friday, August 11, 1967
Atlanta, GA

After returning from a Real Estate Brokers convention in San Francisco, Dr. King addresses the body of the National Association of Radio Announcers during their annual convention. The Reverend expresses appreciation for the influence radio has had in an unrepresented community of uneducated listeners who may otherwise be denied information and economic opportunity.

MLK's Public Statement Regarding Court Hearings

Friday, December 3, 1965
Alabama (AL)

Dr. King compares past discrimination to recent strides that have been made in the American justice system.

I've Been to the Mountaintop

Wednesday, April 3, 1968
Memphis, TN, Birmingham, AL

Dr. King gave this address at the Mason Temple in Memphis, Tennessee the night before he was assassinated. He called for nonviolent protest and a boycott of Memphis area businesses in support of the Memphis Sanitation Workers strike. Conveying a sense of foreboding, he not only recounted a near-death experience when he was stabbed near the heart, but also spoke of the possibility of his own demise at the hands of those who opposed him.

Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution

Sunday, August 1, 1965
INDIA, CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Selma, AL, Birmingham, AL

Dr. King delivers the commencement address at Oberlin College in Ohio on June 14, 1965. Nothing is more tragic, he says, than sleeping through a significant period of social change by failing to adopt the new mental attitudes that the new situation demands. He suggests that to remain awake through a great revolution one must embrace a global perspective and work for peace, racial justice, economic justice and brotherhood throughout the world.

Excerpt from MLK's Speech to the National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962
Albany, GA, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King discusses nonviolent resistance and freedom. He further challenges various communities by coining the slogan, "hate is always tragic."

Statement to SCLC Board About Alabama Boycotts

Friday, April 2, 1965
Baltimore, MD

In this statement, Dr. King explains the need for a boycott of the state of Alabama because of extreme violence and police overreaction, which he calls "totalitarian."

Gandhi Society for Human Rights Address by MLK

Thursday, May 17, 1962
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King speaks at a luncheon launching the Gandhi Society on May 17, 1962, citing the great significance of the day: the anniversary of the US Supreme Court decision declaring school segregation unconstitutional, the 100th anniversary of Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation and the centennial of the death of Henry David Thoreau, whose essay on civil disobedience influenced Gandhi. He announces that earlier that day he sent President Kennedy a document seeking an executive order proclaiming all forms of segregation to be a violation of the US Constitution.

Statement Regarding the Passage of the Civil Rights Act, 1964

Dr. King gives a brief statement regarding the importance of the passage of the Civil Rights Act, 1964.

School Desegregation 10 Years Later

Thursday, May 7, 1964
Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA, Indiana (IN)

Dr. King says that there have been few strides made in school desegregation. He says that schools that comply with the desegregation laws do it at an appalling slow pace. Lastly, he says that although there needs to be more progress in both the north and the south, he has hope for the future.