Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Speeches"

Speech at NAACP World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

Thursday, May 28, 1964
GREECE, GERMANY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, KENYA

Dr. King links the quest for individual civil rights to the global struggle for human rights and states that the nation that will achieve preeminence in the world is the one that both guarantees human rights for all and provides for basic needs.

Sunday with Martin Luther King, Jr. Radio Sermon on WAAF-AM Chicago, IL

Sunday, April 10, 1966
Chicago, IL, EGYPT, ISRAEL

This copy of Dr. King's segment on WAAF-AM radio, entitled "Sunday with Martin Luther King," explains the plight of the "Negro" in the South as similar to the oppression experienced by the Israelites in the book of Exodus.

Partial Transcript: Speech at Guardian Association

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Dr. King discusses the events in Montgomery, Alabama as a catalyst in what will become a new world. He stresses that the honor he receives from the Garden Association is not just for him, but for the fifty thousand supporters of the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

March on Washington

Sunday, April 28, 1963
Washington, D.C., Little Rock, AR, North Carolina (NC), New York (NY), New York, NY, Missouri (MO)

In this news release, Roy Wilkins, Executive Secretary of the NAACP, addresses Congress to voice the people's concern in their quest for freedom, jobs and equal rights. He commends Republicans and Democrats in support of legislation to end discrimination.

School Desegregation 10 Years Later

Thursday, May 7, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS), Indiana (IN)

This statement was released by Dr. King ten years after the Supreme Court's decision, Brown versus Board of Education, which made segregation in public schools unconstitutional. The Reverend states, "The naive might believe great strides have been made in school desegregation over the past decade, but this is not at all true."

MLK Announces End of Birmingham Campaign

Friday, May 10, 1963
Birmingham, AL

The Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights released these remarks by Dr. King marking the end of the Birmingham Nonviolent Direct Action Campaign. King describes the day as a climax in the long struggle for justice and freedom in Birmingham and gives credit to Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth, to the thousands who went to jail, to the whites who worked for just solutions and to God. He speaks of the need for continued progress toward equal job opportunities, equal access to public facilities, and equal rights and responsibilities.

MLK Address at the National Biennial Convention

Wednesday, May 14, 1958
Florida (FL), INDIA, INDONESIA, BURMA / MYANMAR, Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King delivers this speech at the National Biennial Convention of the American Jewish Congress. The convention took place May 1, 1958 in Miami Beach, Florida. Dr. King discusses how the Jewish and Negro communities are unified by the escape of bondage. They share a common fight against the deadly enemies of oppression. He continues on to discuss the things that need to be done in order for African Americans to reach great potential along with the importance of fighting for and obtaining democracy.

MLK's Statement at Prayer Rally in Albany, Georgia

Wednesday, August 15, 1962
Albany, GA

After the bombing of a local church, Dr. King delivered this statement attempting to both criticize the actions of the perpetrators and provide a sense of calm to Albany demonstrators.

MLK Statement Regarding an Attack on the First Amendment

Monday, October 30, 1967
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., California (CA), Berkeley, CA, Wisconsin (WI), New York (NY), New York, NY, Ohio (OH), Selma, AL

Dr. King addresses violations of First Amendment Rights in this statement regarding the events at Birmingham, Alabama in 1963.

I Have A Dream

South Carolina (SC), Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA), Alabama (AL)

In the most famous of his speeches, given from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial at the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, Dr. King drew on themes from previous sermons and speeches, including an address he called The American Dream. Citing Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation, the US Constitution, and the Declaration of Independence, King calls upon the nation to fulfill its promise of freedom and justice for all of its citizens. Although he began by reading from a manuscript, he later abandoned it and spoke directly to the crowd of more than 200,000.

The Real Poverty

Sunday, December 4, 1966
Alabama (AL)

SCLC Director of Public Relations Junius Griffin announces the opening of the Anti-Poverty Coordinating Committee of the Wilcox County, Alabama branch of the SCLC. Throughout the speech, he asserts that true poverty is a "man without compassion," and that any person who does not know how to help others is worse off than "our ancestors who were slaves."

Speech to the Synagogue Council of America

Sunday, December 5, 1965
New York (NY), CHINA

Dr. King receives the Judaism and World Peace Award from the Synagogue Council of America and uses the occasion to speak about the Civil Rights Movement and international peace. He laments the vehement criticism of dissent and discussion of the Vietnam War and enumerates reasons why the Hebrew prophets are so needed today.

A Statement to the South and Nation

Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Georgia (GA), HUNGARY, South Africa

This seemingly unexceptional document signifies the birth of the SCLC. Dr. King, Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth and Rev. C. K. Steele assembled a consortium of leaders in Atlanta following the end of the Montgomery Bus Boycott. The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement that addresses the intimidation, discrimination and economic disparity Negroes face in the South. The statement appeals to the federal government to intervene against assaults that block basic civil rights.

The 105th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation-Rev. C.L. Fullwood

Rev. C.L. Fullwood drafts a sermon to commemorate the "105th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclimation for the Black People of America.:

MLK Address at Park Sheraton Hotel

Wednesday, September 12, 1962
New York, NY

Dr. King gives an address commemorating the one hundredth anniversary of the passage of the Emancipation Proclamation. In the celebratory speech, he calls all Americans to take action in applying the principles of the Emancipation Proclamation to society. Dr. King states that the commands of the Proclamation have fallen short in practice and that it will take a cumulative effort from every citizen to undo this process.

The Modern Negro Activist

Montgomery, AL, GHANA, NIGERIA, KENYA, CONGO / ZAIRE, Alabama (AL), California (CA), Cambridge, MA, Massachusetts (MA)

Dr. King profiles the emergent young Negro civil rights activist who is college-educated, creative, brave and committed to the discipline of non-violence. He attributes the activist's diligence to a keen awareness that they inhabit a world on the cusp of positive social change and that they will have the privilege to direct that change. They are no longer to be an imitator of his white counterpart, but rather an initiator and leader in this new age.

MLK's Address to the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity

Monday, October 12, 1964
Missouri (MO), INDIA

This address by Dr. King was delivered to the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity the day before it was announced that he had been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. In addressing the topic "Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution," Dr. King argues that the church must inspire it's members to be active and advocate against injustice, reaffirm the misconduct of racial segregation, and work towards social change in a nonviolent and peaceful manner.

Statement from the Eisenhower Administration to the NAACP

Sunday, June 26, 1955
New Jersey (NJ), Atlantic City, NJ, Washington, D.C.

In an address to the NAACP, Vice President Richard Nixon discusses the reasons that progress has been made in the Eisenhower Administration and the goals that the organization needs to continue working toward.

Remarks by MLK in Acceptance of the Spingarn Medal

Friday, June 28, 1957
Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), EGYPT, GHANA, Washington, D.C.

In his acceptance speech for the Spingarn Medal, Dr. King remarks about the need for continuing the fight for social justice and equality around the world. He acknowledges the work of NAACP along with protesters as they continue to be on the frontline in addressing the nation's social ills.

Draft of Speech for SCLC in Nashville

Nashville, TN

Dr. King is outlining a speech he later presented to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in Nashville.

Vision of a World Made New

Thursday, September 9, 1954
ISRAEL, INDIA, UNITED KINGDOM, FRANCE, NETHERLANDS

This is a draft of "The Vision of a World Made New," a speech that Dr. King delivered during the 1954 Women's Auxiliary Convention. President Nannie H. Burroughs invited Dr. King to address the group's annual meeting where he condemned imperialism, colonialism, and segregation.

Statement by MLK

Friday, December 11, 1964
Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA

This document contains Dr. King's remarks on injustices in the state of Mississippi. He suggests a complete boycott if the federal or state government is unable to perform the proper means of justice.

The Chicago Plan

Friday, January 7, 1966
Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Tennessee (TN), Indiana (IN), Louisville, KY, Birmingham, AL, CONGO / ZAIRE, BELGIUM, SOUTH AFRICA, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Philadelphia, PA, New York, NY

Dr. King laments over Chicago becoming so much like the South that many African Americans moved north to get away from. Dr. King lays out reasons why African Americans suffer more in Chicago than any other northern city and provides directions to correct the problem.

SCLC Resolution on 1966 Civil Rights Act

Thursday, August 11, 1966
Jackson, MS, Mississippi (MS), Chicago, IL

At its Tenth Annual Convention, the SCLC Board adopts a resolution calling upon President Johnson and Congress to reverse a vote on Title IV (Open Housing) of the Civil Rights Act of 1966 that effectively permits discrimination in the sale or rental of private housing. It also faults the Administration for failure to enforce Title VI (Ban on Federal Funds for Segregated Programs and Schools) of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and for inadequate appointment of voter examiners under the 1965 Voting Rights Act.

MLK Statement on Libel Suit

Wednesday, July 14, 1965

Dr. King makes a public statement regarding a libel suit. He explains that he has been served papers but is not at liberty to comment.

The Montgomery Story

Wednesday, June 27, 1956
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, California (CA), San Francisco, CA, Massachusetts (MA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, INDIA, UNITED KINGDOM

Dr. King delivers an address entitled the "Montgomery Story" at the NAACP 47th Annual Convention. He address several issues throughout the address including: segregation, civil rights, equality, slavery and religion.

The Law and Civil Disobedience

Tuesday, August 23, 1960
Atlanta, GA, Connecticut (CT), London, England, Kentucky (KY), Georgia (GA), UNITED KINGDOM

Harris Wofford, a law professor and member of Senator John F. Kennedy's staff, discusses civil disobedience and its relationship to the law at the student association of Notre Dame Law School. He advocates in favor of civil disobedience using the theories of Thoreau, Socrates, Gandhi and others to support the need to break unjust laws. Dr. King pens handwritten questions on the top of this document pertaining to the changing of unjust laws in the courts.

MLK Speech at Nobel Peace Prize Recognition Dinner

Wednesday, January 27, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Los Angeles, CA, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King delivers this address after returning from his trip to Oslo, Norway. A recognition dinner is held in his hometown of Atlanta, Georgia as an honor for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. King thanks supporters, family, and friends, however, accepts the award on behalf of the many people struggling for justice and civil rights. He states that oppressed people can only stay oppressed for so long because "the yearning for freedom eventually manifests itself."

Draft of MLK's Public Statement Concerning SCLC Supporting Communism

New York, NY, Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King addresses the accusation in the New York Herald Tribune that some SCLC members support Communism. He also states that the SCLC has severed ties with former member Jack O'Dell, including the fundraising that had taken place in New York.

MLK on the New York Riots

Monday, July 27, 1964
New York (NY), Mississippi (MS), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King discusses the recent riots that occurred in New York. While some people would like to place the blame on violent blacks, King asserts that one should examine the real issues behind the violence and riots. King states that many blacks feel they will never gain equality in housing, employment, or education, which is why they react violently.