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Dr. King finds the best description of the unknowable nature of immortality in the New Testament of the Bible. It is a fragment of 1 Corinthians 2:9 regarding heaven.


Dr. King references behaviorist John B. Watson regarding man's behavior.


Dr. King gives a definition of the Greek term "homoionsios."

Schleiermacher (Christology)

Dr. King outlines an excerpt from the author Schleiermacher in referencing an idea of Christ.

Sin in Psalms

Dr. King writes notes on the topic of sin, quoting Psalm 51:5.


Dr. King quotes a statement from Charles H. Cooley's "The Social Process," in which Cooley defines society as a living, unified group of processes.

Bible 252

This exam from a course entitled "Bible 252" lists forty-eight questions regarding Biblical knowledge.


Dr. King discusses how the discoveries of renowned astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus and German philosopher Immanuel Kant revolutionized thinking regarding the human mind. The note card also outlines philosophical views originating from the "analogy of two clocks" referencing prominent thinkers Rene Descartes and Gottfried Leibniz.

Moral Law

Dr. King documents a statement from the Federal Council of Churches concerning the significance of moral law. King writes, "This statement from the Federal Council of Churches is pertinent."


This set of note cards written by Dr. King explores the causation of error. King quotes Alfred North Whitehead's "The Concept of Nature" noting several reasons as to the rise of error.


Dr. King references the Old Testament biblical book of Leviticus regarding the topic of sin.

Schleiermacher (Dogmas & Creeds)

Dr. King references Friedrich Schleiermacher's notions of dogmas and creeds, stating that they are mere descriptions of feeling.


Dr. King quotes Marcus Tullius Cicero’s “De Natura Deorum,” providing references from William Wallace’s “The Logic of Hegel.”


Dr. King references Karl Marx's thoughts on capitalism.

Periods of Greek Literature

Dr. King provides brief notes on three periods of Greek literature.


Dr. King references German philosopher, George Hegal, in this handwritten notecard.

The Self

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman's book "The Source of Human Good."


Dr. King references German philosopher Karl Marx regarding his teachings. King states, "Marx teaching resolves into three principal elements: a philosophy of history, and economic theory, and a practical program for the realization of a new social order."

God: Judeo-Christian View vs. Greek View

Dr. King cites a passage from the Old Testament book of Psalms to compare and contrast the Jewish and Greek view of God.

DeWolf, Harold

Dr. King references Harold DeWolf's book, "A Theology of the Living Church."

Schleiermacher (The Essence of Christianity)

Dr. King writes that Friedrich Schleiermacher describes the essence of Christianity as a belief in Jesus as the origin of the Christian faith and his work as that of redemption.

Barth, Karl

Dr. King references Karl Barth's "The Doctrine of the Word of God."


Dr. King cites chapter 5, verse 7 of the Old Testament book of Job. This scripture highlights the fact that trouble is necessary in life.


Dr. King shares his personal insight on Greek and African "ability," relative to African-Americans.


Dr. King expounds upon suffering and notes that things which may not appear as defeat, may be transformed in victory.

History: Voltaire

Dr. King references a quote from the philosopher and historian Voltaire.

Evil (The Problem of)

Dr. King records thoughts on the problem of evil with references to the British philosopher John Stuart Mill and Job.

Ritschl, Albrecht

Dr. King provides a biographical sketch of German theologian Albrecht Ritschl.

Essay on Walter Rauschenbusch

This essay exams Walter Rauschenbushch views on the relationship between the Church and Society.

Schleiermacher (The Social Implication of Religion)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”