Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Education"

Worship

Dr. King provides a definition of worship.

Hegel

Dr. King outlines principles of Hegelian Philosophy regarding the ideal German State.

Jesus Christ

Dr. King quotes Baruch Spinoza's "Epistle 21" to Henry Oldenburg.

Dogmatics

Dr. King records a note on the function of dogmatic theology and a quote from Karl Barth's "Church Dogmatics: The Doctrine of the Word of God."

Judgment

Dr. King cites the Old Testament Book of Isaiah regarding the subject judgment.

Toynbee

Dr. King highlights a quote from Arnold J. Toynbee's twelve-volume analysis of the rise and fall of civilizations, "A Study of History."

Pelagianism

Dr. King defines Pelagianism as the belief that original sin did not taint human nature and that mortal will is still capable of choosing good or evil without divine aid.

God

Dr. King cites the Old Testament biblical book of Deuteronomy expressing that there is only one God.

Jesus Christ

Dr. King quotes St. Irenaeus of Lyons.

Arianism

Dr. King writes about Arianism, a view named after Arius of Alexandria. Arianism acknowledges the divinity of God the father and Jesus the son; however, under this doctrine Jesus is subordinate to God.

Man

Dr. King notes that the psalmist’s view of man in Psalms 12:1 seems to indicate that there are no longer godly men.

History: Voltaire

Dr. King references a quote from the philosopher and historian Voltaire.

Humanism

Dr. King discusses the relationship between God and humanist thinking.

Note Card on Hugo of St. Victor

This note card concerns Hugo of St. Victor's dealings with theology and mysticism.

God

Dr. King quotes Jeremiah 29:13-14, noting that man can find God if he searches with all his heart.

Evil (The Problem of)

Dr. King records thoughts on the problem of evil with references to the British philosopher John Stuart Mill and Job.

Primacy of Events

Dr. King notes Alfred North Whitehead’s view on the primacy of events over space and time.

Worship

Dr. King quotes an excerpt from James Bissett Pratt's "Religious Consciousness," which focuses on the purpose of the Protestant sermon. Dr. King expands Pratt's analysis to encompass the entire Protestant service.

Oxford Movement

Dr. King explains the Oxford Movement, a nineteenth century movement within the Anglican Church.

God: Attributes, Relation to World et.

Dr. King references numerous biblical scriptures on the attributes of God.

Society

Dr. King quotes a statement from Charles H. Cooley's "The Social Process," in which Cooley defines society as a living, unified group of processes.

MLK's Examination Book for Bible Course

Dr. King writes this essay about the problems Habakkuk presents to Jehovah. He argues that God no longer judges humanity as a collective entity, but as individuals within humanity.

Man The Christian View

Dr. King outlines Reinhold Niebuhr’s three ways in which the Christian view of man differs from all others, citing “The Nature and Destiny of Man.”

Sin in Psalms

Dr. King writes notes on the topic of sin, quoting Psalm 51:5.

Ethical Relativism

Dr. King outlines an unknown author's views on ethical relativism.

Man

Dr. King writes his thoughts on man.

God

Dr. King writes about God, according to the first chapter of the Old Testament book, Nahum.

Knowledge of God

Dr. King references religious philosopher Henry Nelson Wieman regarding his views on science and knowing God. In part of this eight card series, Dr. King records Wieman's belief that "It is probable he can never be known completely; but we can increase our knowledge of Him by contemplation... and form scientific methods on the other."

Metaphysic[s]

Dr. King quotes William James’ “The Sentiment of Rationality” on Arthur Schopenhauer’s view of metaphysics.

Sin

Dr. King quotes two verses from the book of Leviticus.