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"Education"

Theology

Dr. King quotes William Ernest Hocking's "The Meaning of God in Human Experience."

Philosophical Work

Dr. King outlines significant philosophical and theological publications from the eleventh to the nineteenth century. Thinkers whose work is referenced include: St. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Machiavelli, Thomas Hobbes, and John Locke.

Individualization

Dr. King cites philosopher and theologian Paul Tillich's definition of individualization. He explains, "it is implied in and constitutive of every self, which means that at least in an analogous way it is implied in and constitutive of every being."

Hegel

Dr. King documents a quote from philosopher Thomas Hegel regarding God and knowledge before commenting with his own thoughts.

Category Time

Dr. King outlines Paul Tillich's view on time.

The Purpose of the State

Dr. King records some thoughts on the functions of the state.

Angeology

Dr. King cites the reference in Isaiah 6:2 to a seraphim, likely "a winged human figure."

Freedom

Dr. King quotes from Hegel's "The Philosophy of History."

Class Notes Psalms

Dr. King writes several scriptures from the Book of Psalms found in the Old Testament of the Bible.

God

ISRAEL

Dr. King writes about God, according to Isaiah 40: 12-31.

Metaphysics

Dr. King notes William James' view of metaphysics.

God

Dr. King explores the topic of God and quotes the classical scholar Gilbert Murray.

Religion

Dr. King quotes William Ernest Hocking's "The Meaning of God in Human Experience."

Spirit

Dr. King records some thoughts on the meaning of "spirit."

God Nature

Dr. King sketches his thoughts on Saint Thomas Aquinas' "investigation of God's nature."

Perceiving God (Wieman)

Dr. King writes notes on perceiving God using Nelson Henry Wieman's text, "The Source of Human God."

Brightman's Idea of God

Dr. King references philosopher and theologian Edgar Brightman's idea of God. According to Brightman, God is finite and "powerful enough to lead the work toward higher and higher levels."

Jesus Christ

Dr. King quotes Albert Ritschl's "The Christian Doctrine of Justification and Reconciliation" on the place Christ holds in Christianity as its historical founders.

Religion

Dr. King's focuses on religious beliefs and their relation to intellectual concepts.

SCLC Revel Report

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

In this report, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference provides the strategic planning for a nationwide program aimed at educating African Americans on nonviolence principles.

How Modern Christians Should Think of Man

New York, NY

In the early 1950's, Dr. King writes a paper elaborating on how modern Christians should think about man. He discusses the difficulty of transition by idealizing the perception of man in a mild neo-orthodox or liberal view. Dr. King battles with having an optimistic view of man and the reality of his experiences in the south. He asserts that man is neither good nor bad by nature by has the potential for either. The objectivity of man as a finite child of nature is further expounded upon. He explains that man is rational, free, and a responsible being.

Science (Its Limitations)

Dr. King notes that while man’s actions as an animal are biological (science), his actions as a person are spiritual and require a spiritual cause, suggesting there is a Creator God.

Art - Aesthetic

Dr. King notes several passages from Paul Tillich's "The Religious Situation." The quotes relay the importance of art and its aesthetic value on the function of spiritual situations.

Jesus' Ethical Character

Dr. King documents biblical passages that highlight Jesus' virtues.

Ritschl and Schleiermacher

Dr. King compares the thoughts of German theologian's Friedrich Schleiermacher and Albrecht Ritschl.

Schleiermacher (The Church)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “The Christian Faith.”

Jesus Christ

Dr. King references theological literature regarding the development of Christianity.

Cognition

This note card discusses cognition in relation to the context of events.

The Suffering Servant

ISRAEL

Dr. King writes that Isaiah 53 presents a different view of the servant from chapters 42, 49 and 50. The concept of God's servant evolved from that of Israel as a nation, to the spiritual or inner Israel, to an individual who would take up the work that the others would not. King concludes that the prophecy was fulfilled in Jesus of Nazareth.

Tritheism

Dr. King notes the definition of tritheism.