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"Education"

Term Paper Notes

During Dr. King's matriculation through Crozer Theological Seminary, he writes a term paper that contains results of a historical study on Mesopotamia and Egypt.

Judaism (View of Jesus)

Dr. King outlines some principles regarding Judaism according to the "Jewish Encyclopedia."

God: Attributes, Relation to World et.

Dr. King references numerous biblical scriptures on the attributes of God.

What the Reformation Took Out

This note card lists the effects of the Reformation on Christian worship. Summarizing the consequences, Dr. King notes, "the intellectual element was overemphasized."

Omnipotence

Dr. King quotes James Ward's "The Realm of Ends."

Jesus Christ

Dr. King highlights a quote from "Evil and the Christian Faith" by Nels F S. Ferre regarding Jesus and his relationship with humanity.

Selfishness

Dr. King cites Schopenhauer's book "The World as Will and Ideas" and records a passage on selfishness.

Science (Its Limitations)

Dr. King notes that while man’s actions as an animal are biological (science), his actions as a person are spiritual and require a spiritual cause, suggesting there is a Creator God.

Note Card Entitled Atheism

Atheism is cited from Sparrier in this note card.

The Nationalism of Ezra

This note card outlines Ezra views on "mixed marriages."

Resurrection of Jesus

Dr. King writes about John Mansfield's play entitled "The Trial of Jesus."

Job

Dr. King reflects on the purpose of suffering in the Book of Job and how Job deals with it.

Science

Dr. King quotes a statement from A.D. Ritchie's "Civilization, Science and Religion" regarding the limits of science. Ritchie contradicts the idea that science can do "anything and everything."

Jesus: Divinity and Missions

In this series of note cards, Dr. King documents various biblical passages from the New Testament that discuss Jesus' divinity. The passages are abbreviated and listed with their biblical citations.

Difference of the Transition Period from the Early Scientific Period

Dr. King references Alfred North Whitehead by noting the differences between the Transition Period and the Early Scientific Period.

Judgment

Dr. King references the Book of Amos regarding the "day of the Lord." According to Amos, this would be a day of judgment, opposed to a day of national exaltation.

The Bible

Dr. King records his views of Scott regarding "The Bible." Scott believes that beyond being an "anthology of the noblest religions," the Bible is also an account of history. Even though there is the ambiguity that comes with history, there is also an unambiguous message of the purpose of God and the destiny of man.

Joshua and Judges

Dr. King cites Biblical scriptures from the books of Joshua, Judges, and 1 Samuel.

Immortality

Dr. King cites the Old Testament Book of Isaiah regarding the topic of immorality.

Cause, Error and Law

Dr. King quotes from Alfred North Whitehead's The Concept of Nature.

Evil - Psalms

Dr. King writes on the subject of evil according to the book of Psalms.

John Locke

Dr. King records a quote from English political theorist John Locke on the development of the human mind.

Wisdom

Dr. King quotes and comments on Proverbs 2:6, saying that wisdom is a supreme virtue for the author of Proverbs and involves moral character and knowledge.

God - II Kings

Dr. King cites II Kings 5:15 as as affirmation of monotheism.

Note Card on Hugo of St. Victor

This note card concerns Hugo of St. Victor's dealings with theology and mysticism.

Aristotle in Thomas

Dr. King outlines aspects of St. Thomas Aquinas' philosophy, which are structurally Aristotelian. Points he discusses include similarities between the two philosophers' ontology and epistemology, while also outlining a point of divergence in Aquinas' view of God as an "efficient cause."

The Categories

Dr. King contemplates the fourth level of ontological concepts, which focus on the categories of thought and being. Referencing Paul Tillich, King notes the categories that are most relevant to theology.

God

This scripture, deriving from the Old Testament biblical book of Isaiah, illustrates God as holy.

Sabellianism

Dr. King defines "Sabellianism" as the concept of acknowledging God as one entity with three modes.

Psychology

This series of note cards addresses psychology through the means of human unity. The concept of human unity is indicated by the presence of the body and the soul working in conjunction to inform the human experience. Dr. King references the views of St. Augustine and St. Thomas as it pertains to "the close union between body and soul."