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Letter from C.A. Echols to MLK

Thursday, July 1, 1965

C.A. Echols requests a copy of Dr. King's publication "The Time for Freedom Has Come" to be included in his upcoming thesis "Thoreau and Civil Disobedience."

Hegel's Social Ethics

Dr. King writes notes on Hegel's social ethics. He quotes, "The principle triad here consist of law in the sense of abstract right, morality, and social ethics." According to Hegel, abstract right may be defined as being a person and respecting other people, while morality refers to one's conscience and social ethics regards another triad, being family, civil society, and the state.

Letter from Prue Robertson to Ethel Minor

Friday, June 9, 1967

Prue Robertson, secretary to Mrs. King, writes Ethel Minor concerning students in Belgium that would like to correspond with S.N.C.C.

Nobel Prize Atlanta Dinner Address Outline

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

Dr. King outlines his address for the January 27, 1965 recognition dinner honoring him for the Nobel Peace Prize. He intends to speak on topics of racial justice, nonviolence and poverty, while discussing the strides made by the movement and the uphill battles still to be faced. Over 1000 people attended the program, the first integrated dinner in Atlanta's history.

Background of the Speakers

This document lists speakers for rallies in New York and San Francisco and gives a short biography of each person. The speakers include people such as Dr. Benjamin Spock, Dr. King, Rev. James Bevel, Floyd McKissick, Julian Bond and others. The document also lists folk singers for each rally location, a list that includes Pete Seeger.

Newspaper Article-New York TImes

Thursday, June 18, 1964

This newspaper clipping is dated from the June 18, 1964 edition of the New York Times. In this article, Dr. King's new book entitled, "Why We Can't Wait" is advertised as "required reading."

Letter from David S. Tillson MLK

Friday, May 5, 1967

Dr. Davis S. Tillson congratulates Dr. King on his statement regarding foreign policy.

Adverse Letter from an Anonymous Sender

An unknown sender states their concerns about the direction Dr. King is leading the movement.

Letter from Waltraud Feller to MLK

Thursday, February 29, 1968

Waltraud Feller writes Dr. King requesting his autograph and any other information that he can provide.

Letter from MLK to Chandrasekhar Bhattacharya

Wednesday, January 12, 1966

Dr. King writes Chandrasekhar Bhattacharya in response to a letter that requested prayer for their first born child, Chiraashree. Dr. King expresses his appreciation for their sentiments regarding his work and informs Bhattacharya that their child will forever be in his prayers.

Letter from Septima Clark to MLK

Friday, December 22, 1967

Ms. Clark writes Dr. King with excitement about her granddaughter's accomplishment as a tutor. After saving her earnings of $5.00 per week, Ms. Clark's granddaughter managed to purchase Dr. King a holiday gift complete with special wrapping.

Letter from Student Michael Chernoby to MLK

Saturday, May 1, 1965

Michael Chernoby, a student at West Catholic High School, offers his support to Dr. King and the movement by choosing social work as a profession. According to Chernoby, "If I can do only a fraction of the good that you have done for mankind I will consider myself a success."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. R. Elliot

Wednesday, February 21, 1968

This letter is in response to an inquiry made by Mr. R. Elliot, on February 8th, 1968, in regards to housing development plans for the Ebenezer Baptist Church.

"Discerning the Signs of History"

Sunday, November 15, 1964

Dr. King believes that there are lessons in understanding the process of history, that evil carries the seed of destruction and that militarism is ultimately suicidal. Dr. King states that "history teaches the lesson that all reality hinges on moral foundations."

Letter from Joan Daves to Miss Dora MacDonald Regarding MLK's Schedule

Monday, December 12, 1966

Here Joan Daves writes to Dr. King's secretary, Ms. Dora MacDonald, requesting to know when and where Dr. King can be reached while in New York. Joan Daves also informs Miss MacDonald of the availability of Hermine Popper and requests the notes from earlier publishing meetings.

MLK Explains Nonviolent Resistance

Dr. King explores the underpinnings of nonviolent resistance by analyzing Thoreau's "On Civil Disobedience," the teachings of Gandhi and the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

Letter from the Japan Council Against Atomic and Hydrogen Bombs to MLK

Tuesday, June 6, 1967

Japanese Representatives write Dr. and Mrs. King inviting them to the 13th World Conference against atomic and hydrogen bombs.

On Using Christian Words

Dr. King references Henry Nelson Wieman's book "On Using Christian Words."

Letter from Carmen Rivera to Mrs. King 4/5/68

Carmen Rivera, a young girl from NYC, writes to Mrs. King to offer her condolences after the assasination of Dr. King.

SCLC Mail Log: February 28, 1968

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

This mail log exemplifies the large quantity of correspondence that the SCLC received daily, as well as the method that they devised to deal with it. The mail log for this day shows a variety of types of correspondence, including invitations, invoices, contributions, and personal letters from friends and colleagues.

Subsistance Pay for Voter Workers

Friday, December 31, 1965

Copy of a Crusade for Citizenship disbursement check paid to an Alabama worker in a Voter Registaion program. Reason for disbursement is subsistance pay.

Letter from MLK to Devorah E. Sherman

Friday, July 31, 1964

Dr. King writes Mrs. Devorah Sherman to thank her for her financial contribution to the SCLC.

Letter from Daniel B. Brewster to MLK

Wednesday, April 28, 1965

Senator Daniel B. Brewster writes Dr. King to thank him for urging his support for the elimination of the poll tax.

Letter from Thomas M. Ward to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1962

Thomas M. Ward, Assistant to the Minister of Calvin Presbyterian Church, requests that Dr. King provide documentation to defend against allegations of being a Communist or Communist sympathizer.

Challenge to New Age - Importance of Voting

In this challenge to the public, the author lists a number of reasons supporting the importance of voting in the black community, then concludes with a call to join the ranks of the SCLC.

Letter from Roy Pfaff of Promoting Enduring Peace Inc.

Promoting Enduring Peace Inc. invites friends of the organization to participate in one of their 1968 travel seminars. The three tours consist of the Round-The-World Goodwill Seminar, Soviet Union Tour, Around-The World Across Siberia, Mongolia and Japan. The traveling seminars include conferences, interviews, and other cultural educational features. The organization provides the member with possible materials they could order prior to leaving for one of the seminars.

War

Dr. King quotes Napoleon, Gen. Dwight Eisenhower, Gen. Douglas MacArthur, and Gen. Omar Bradley on war as impractical.

Letter from Gitta Badeker to Dora McDonald Regarding "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Tuesday, July 11, 1967

In this letter Badeker writes to McDonald about the advancement from Gummessons Bokforlag for "Where Do We Go From Here."

Letter from Mrs. W. Brown to MLK

Mrs. W. Brown proclaims that Dr. King should preach a colorblind love that is absent of hate and resentment toward white people. She further asserts that the contributions Dr. King received could have been used to improve substandard housing. Mrs. Brown continues to discuss her perception of the inadequacies within the black community in comparison to white people.

MLK Examination Book for Bible Course

Tuesday, March 26, 1946

Dr. King answers a number of questions for an exam in his Bible course. He covers diverse topics, including prophecy and the Book of Job.