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Letter from Winthrop Steele to MLK

Sunday, April 30, 1967

Winthrop Steele writes Dr. King asserting that he was a supporter and fan of Dr. King and his civil rights doctrine until his recent remarks about the Vietnam War. Steele advises Dr. King to take a sabbatical, reexamine his views, and focus on civil rights.

Letter from MLK to David J. Walker

Wednesday, January 13, 1965

Dr. King declines an invitation from the Junior Board of Trade to speak in Toronto.

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

The American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa writes an uplifting message to General Yakubu Gowon of Lagos, Nigeria. They extend a "hand in friendship" to bring the war in Nigeria to an end.

Letter from Playboy Magazine to MLK

Thursday, July 27, 1967

Doug Benson writes on behalf of Hugh Hefner in response to a letter from Dr. King requesting donations. Benson informs Dr. King that Mr. Hefner, who supports the civil rights struggle, suggests placing a shorter, more personalized, appeal for funds in The Playboy Forum.

Letter from David M. Wallace to Dora McDonald

Monday, February 6, 1967

David Wallace writes Dora McDonald and attaches contributions from Negro businessmen involved with Chicago's Operation Breadbasket.

DeWolf L. Harold: RRR (1949)

Dr. King references Harold DeWolf's book "The Religious Revolt Against Reason."

Telegram from Dr. Robert Green to MLK

Monday, September 12, 1966

Dr. Robert L. Green, Executive Director of Friends of SNCC Los Angeles, criticizes recent remarks made by the SCLC regarding his organization. Dr. Green also advises Dr. King that the SCLC should not comment on SNCC, if the SCLC cannot say something positive.

Letter from Charles McC. Mathias, Jr. to MLK

Monday, March 8, 1965

Maryland Congressman Charles M. Mathias thanks Dr. King for his letter regarding the Representative's recent trip to Selma, Alabama. As a result of his visit, Congressman Mathias informs Dr. King that he prepared and introduced civil rights legislation to the latest House of Representatives session.

Some Things We Can Do

In this series of note cards entitled "Some Things We Can Do," Dr. King provides several suggestions pertaining to the African American community.

Letter from Sharon Drebert to MLK

Monday, March 18, 1968

Sharon Drebert communicates with Dr. King about submitting information for the 'Choice 68' campaign. She asks that Dr. King submit any campaign literature before April 23, 1968. Dr. King would be assassinated on April 4, 1968.

Letter from Charles and Leslie Gray to MLK about Contribution

Wednesday, December 13, 1967

In this letter, the Grays send an enclosed contribution to Dr. King in support of his "approach in the civil rights movement."

Draft of Speech On Passage of 1965 Voting Rights Act

Dr. King discusses the prevalence of racial issues in society. Discrimination and segregation still occur but through means in which the government has not declared unconstitutional. One of the main problems discussed was housing discrimination. Many African Americans were forced to live in slum housing in bad areas because they were not able to buy a house in the "white neighborhoods." Dr. King states that this type of social injustice cannot continue if the nation wants to progress.

Letter from Eugen Bosch to MLK

Monday, March 13, 1967

Eugen Bosch writes to Dr. King to tell him that, "As always, King was rational and understanding and put the whole thing in the right perspective." Bosch is hopeful that Dr. King will help James Meredith, who had decided to run for Congress in a special election against the incumbent, Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.

My Dream: Peace - God's Business and Man's

Saturday, November 27, 1965

This document is a draft in progress of an article wrote for the Chicago Defender. Dr. King conveys his desire for war to be eliminated as an option to solve the nation's problems. He feels that full equality will never come to pass unless solutions involving violence are deemed to be methods of the past.

Telegram from Duncan Bradford to MLK

Duncan Bradford, the executive secretary for the British Columbia Hospitals' Association, requests for Dr. King to make an address at the national convention to speak out against the atrocities occurring around the word.

Letter from Tom Offenburger to MLK

In a letter from Tom Offenburger to Dr. King, a response to a newspaper article written by Bruce Galphin is attached. The article refers to the Civil Rights Movement as a rather violent campaign, due to the harm done to the "good order of society." The response argues on the side of the Civil Rights Movement, and further proves that it is indeed a nonviolent campaign.


Dr. King notes that Genesis 5:24, 6:9 and 6:22 make it clear that sin is not universal.

Letter from Stuart E. Atkinson to the SCLC

Stuart E. Atkinson sends a donation to the SCLC and requests the address to which he should send donated clothing and toys.

Biographical Sketch of James Bevel

This one page biography summarizes the achievements of James Bevel, one of the founding members of SNCC. The biography highlights Bevel's involvement with civil rights drives in Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi, including the Freedom Rides and numerous SCLC action programs.

Man (Sin)

Dr. King writes about Jeremiah's loss of confidence in man, reflecting on the biblical passage Jeremiah 9: 4-6.

Letter From Bernard Lafayette, Jr. to Dennis Brunn

Thursday, January 25, 1968

This is a memorandum thanking Mr. Brunn for his letter of support for the labor unions.

Letter from Robert Gabor to MLK

Thursday, June 27, 1963

Robert Gabor writes Dr. King inviting him to Oslo, Norway to speak at the 7th International Congress of the International Union of Socialist Youth. Gabor expresses to Dr. King that their organization supports "the present struggle of the American Negro."

Letter from George Overton to MLK

Wednesday, August 4, 1954

George Overton sends Dora McDonald a letter thanking her for the calendar of Dr. King's family. He also requests some photographs and expresses his support of Dr. King.

Letter from Mildred Hood to MLK

Saturday, May 7, 1966

Mildred Hood explains to Dr. King what she and her daughter experienced at the Cook County Hospital in Chicago. Hood wants to know what she can do about the situation.

Handwritten Letter from MLK to "Dorothy"

This document is a draft of an addendum to a letter Dr. King had previously worked on and is addressed to "Dorothy." While most of this document centers on "support" and is based on form templates, Dr. King specifically mentions a "suggestion concerning 'Lil Abuer" [phonetic].

Letter from Francis M. Evans to MLK

Thursday, August 13, 1964

Francis Evans wishes to acquire an autographed portrait of Dr. King for his employee, Captain Arthur Graves. Captain Graves is in preparation for a transfer and Evans wants to honor Graves with a special memento.

The Bible

Dr. King records notes regarding Protestant Orthodoxy and its great error in dealing with the Bible.

Dr. Paul Arthur Scilpp Speech in Illinois

In this address delivered before the National Assembly for Progress in Equality of Opportunity in Housing, Dr. Paul Arthur Schilpp speaks about equality between races, "pure" race, and voting rights for Negroes.

Notes from S.B. Well to Ralph Abernathy

S. B. Well forwards Rev. Ralph Abernathy notes about several upcoming and current events pertaining to voter registration in the second and third district of Georgia.

Letter from Marie L. Jones Regarding Reverend Ashton Jones

Wednesday, September 25, 1963

Mary L. Jones sent out this letter reporting on the plight of her husband, Reverend Ashton Jones, who was arrested in July of 1963 for attempting to lead an interracial student group into a service at the segregated First Baptist Church of Atlanta. Reverend Jones was sentenced to a year in the Georgia state prison and six months of hard labor for the crime of "disturbing a worship service." Mrs. Jones encourages readers of her letter to heed the advice of British social critic Bertrand Russell, by writing an "avalanche of letters" to those responsible.