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Letter from John L. Gregory to MLK

Tuesday, November 19, 1963

John L. Gregory informs Dr. King about the check dedicated to the SCLC. The Vermont Church Council is concerned with the Civil Rights Movement and contributes to Dr. King's organization to be an asset to the improvement of the American society.

Letter from Randolph T. Blackwell to MLK

Randolph T. Blackwell notifies Dr. King about the Office of Economic Opportunity grant to Crawfordville Enterprises in Taliaferro County, Georgia. The program will provide economic expansion for rural areas and education development.

Draft of MLK's An Open Letter to Negro Youth

In an open letter to Negro Youths, Dr. King urges them to stay committed to the nonviolent principles of social change in their plight to gain broad access to education and employment.

Letter from Robert T. Handy to MLK

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

Robert Handy of the Union Theological Seminary invites Dr. King to be the "major evening speaker" for their Conference on Race and Religion.

Letter from The Downtown Charity Club to MLK

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

The Downtown Charity Club wishes to accompany Dr. King from the Baltimore headquarters for the Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C.

Letter from Roy Pfaff of Promoting Enduring Peace Inc.

Promoting Enduring Peace Inc. invites friends of the organization to participate in one of their 1968 travel seminars. The three tours consist of the Round-The-World Goodwill Seminar, Soviet Union Tour, Around-The World Across Siberia, Mongolia and Japan. The traveling seminars include conferences, interviews, and other cultural educational features. The organization provides the member with possible materials they could order prior to leaving for one of the seminars.

Joan Daves Informs MLK of a Proposal to Print the Speech from the March on Washington

Friday, October 23, 1964

Joan Daves negotiates with John Avirgan on the royalty percentage for the rights to sale hand-lettered versions of the Speech from the March on Washington.

Letter from MLK to Roosevelt Zanders

Thursday, May 17, 1962

Dr. King thanks Roosevelt Zanders for his hospitality and generosity during his stay in New York. Dr. King expresses his hopes for their paths to cross in the near future and states that he will be sending Mr. Zanders an autographed copy of his book, "Stride Toward Freedom."

Letter from MLK to John Lee Tilley

Tuesday, October 21, 1958

Dr. King commends Reverend Tilley on writing the preamble of an unnamed document and offers a few minor suggestions for his consideration.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, September 8, 1964

Joan Daves provides the figures for royalties and advances of "Why We Can't Wait."

ABC's Issues and Answers: MLK Interview

Sunday, June 18, 1967

Dr. King sat down with Tom Jerriel, Atlanta Bureau Chief, and John Casserly, Washington Correspondent, of the American Broadcasting Company for their program "Issues and Answers." They discussed the civil rights movement, Dr. King's upcoming book, and the U.S. Supreme Court ruling that Dr. King would serve jail time in Birmingham.

Letter from MLK to Congressman Ogden R. Reid

Friday, February 19, 1965

Dr. King informs Congressman Reid (R-New York) of the positive impact he left on Negro citizens during his visit to Selma, Alabama.

Mass Meeting Featuring MLK

Saturday, April 16, 1960

This document is a program for a mass meeting sponsored by the SCLC and the Raleigh Citizens Association. Dr. King is the principal speaker of this meeting.

Christian Social Philosophy

Dr. King focuses on the interrelatedness of Christian social philosophy, Christian ethics and theology. He argues for the rejection of theology that has no social ethics and also contends that ethics must be dynamic.

The Strength of the Legacy

Sunday, November 22, 1964

In this New York Herald Tribune article, Dr. King refers to the recent 1964 Presidential election as a decisive repudiation of segregation and extremism. He claims the election results honored the memory of President John F. Kennedy, assassinated a year earlier. Kennedy’s greatest contribution to human rights, King says, was his televised appeal to the American people on June 19, 1963 describing equal rights and equal opportunity as a moral issue as old as the scriptures and as clear as the Constitution.

Letter from Nona Collins to MLK

Nona Collins, Legislative Chairman of the Germantown Branch of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, writes Dr. King in support of his stance on civil rights and the Vietnam War.

Letter from Dr. J. H. Young to MLK

Tuesday, September 6, 1966

Dr. J. H. Young writes this letter to Dr. King about slavery, the Civil War, and President Lincoln. He reminds Dr. King that the Civil War was fought not over slavery, but succession.

Letter to Mrs. King from Hon. C.P. Carter and James H. Beverly

Sunday, April 7, 1968

This document was sent from the St. John Grand Lodge Masons of New Jersey, expressing their condolences for Mrs. King's tragic loss following Dr. King's assassination. The letter asks that God grant the King family peace, during their time of bereavement.

Letter from Lawrence G. Holt to MLK Regarding Civil Rights

Saturday, September 30, 1967

In this Letter, Lawrence Holt writes to Dr. King urging him to limit his public comments to those regarding civil rights and not the war in Vietnam. Holt states, "You are in a unique position to help the civil rights movement which you are endangering by your public comments on the war."

Western Union Telegram from Barrington Dunbar to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967

In this telegram, Barrington Dunbar of the peace and social committee from New York, informs Dr. King of the support from his religious society.

Receipt from the University of Bridgeport to MLK

Wednesday, March 27, 1963

This is a receipt from James Halsey to Dr. King for a donation to the University of Bridgeport's development fund.

Letter from Constance A. Price to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968

In this letter, Ms. Price writes to Dr. King to request that he makes mention of the blatant injustices committed by the State of Colorado, to its citizens, during the "poor people's campaign" in Washington, D.C.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK

Friday, February 3, 1967

J. Campe informs Dr. King of the expenses for the Spanish pocket book edition of "Why We Can't Wait" and encloses a royalty check.

The Future of Integration

Dr. King discusses "The Future of Integration." King opens with background history of three distinct periods of race relations. The first period extends from 1619 to 1862, the era of slavery. The next period extends from 1863 to 1954 when blacks were emancipated, but still segregated. The third period started on May 17, 1954 when segregation was deemed unconstitutional and integration commenced. Furthermore, Dr. King explains the changes that occurred as a result of integration and how it will affect blacks and whites in the future.

The Danger of A Little Progress

Monday, February 3, 1964

This focuses on the issue of short term progress within the Civil Rights Movement because it does not offer long term lasting solutions.

Memorandum Regarding Civil Rights Complaints

Robert Greene, John Griffin and Ralph Scott make a claim against the state of New York, asserting that they were denied their civil rights and treated unjustly.

Nobel Lecture by MLK

Friday, December 11, 1964

This is a copy of the Lecture given by Dr. King in Oslo, Norway upon his winning the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. He thanks the Norwegian Parliament for honoring him with this award. He speaks of the evils of racially injustice and the belief that "oppressed people cannot remain oppressed forever." He speaks of the need to peacefully come together in harmony as humanity because a peaceful world cannot be built based on a "negative path."

American Foundation on Nonviolence

Friday, October 1, 1965

As Honorary Chairman of the American Foundation on Nonviolence, Dr. King presents a draft letter in which he calls for individuals to tackle the issues of voter registration, non-violence training, and protection of civil rights leaders by joining the organization and serving on its Board of Directors. Dr. King himself pledges $25,000 of his Nobel Peace Prize funds to the American Foundation on Nonviolence.

Dr. King's response to a letter from Mr. Joseph Beaver

Friday, October 24, 1958

Dr. King, in this letter, thanked Mr. Joseph Beaver for his kindness and for the enclosed booklet entitled "I Want You to Know Wendell Phillips Dabney" sent to him, during his recovery from a nearly fatal stabbing in 1958. Dr. King took a moment to apologize for he and Mrs. King not being able to communicate with Mr. Beaver, while they vacationed in Mexico. He concluded the letter by acknowledging his readiness to rejoin those fighting in the battle for civil rights, once his healing process was complete.

Authoritarianism

Dr. King quotes William Pepperell Montague's "Ways of Knowing."