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Letter from Shirley Leonard to MLK

Sunday, December 31, 1961

Shirley Leonard encloses a check for ten dollars to help Dr. King further integration.

Letter from Max Goldberg to MLK

Wednesday, May 29, 1963

Max Goldberg asserts that the interview conducted with Dr. King a year ago serves relevance for the current progression attempts for the American Negro. Mr. Goldberg is attempting to produce copies of the interview and distribute them to various cities.

Telegram from Mrs. Robbie L. McCoy to MLK

Monday, March 8, 1965

The Chronicle Church Recorder for The Women of Detroit sends Dr. King a request for suggestions regarding the organization's upcoming demonstration against the "treatment of Negroes in Selma Alabama."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Bill Green

Friday, August 2, 1963

Dora McDonald informs Mrs. Bill Green that Dr. King is on an extended lecture tour at the moment. She ensures Mrs. Green that the letter and poem sent will receive his attention upon his return.

"Race Hate and Divisiveness"

This newspaper clipping depicts Dr. King's decision to move the civil rights movement up north as "one of grave peril to everyone concerned." The author believes that the defiance of the law could cause disaster for the Negro cause.

Letter from Anonymous Critic to MLK

A critic sends Dr. King a series of newspaper clippings in order to communicate an adverse view about "negro people." The author brings special attention to an enclosed article about Stokely Carmichael and asks for his view. After accusing Dr. King of receiving money from the Communist Party, the writer states "I will never know why you was given the noble award."

Letter from Christine Schulty to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Christine Schulty offers condolences to Mrs. King after the assassination of Dr. King.

Letter From MLK to Mrs. William Lescase

Tuesday, November 22, 1966

Dr.King thanks Mrs. William Lescaze for her contribution to the SCLC.

Voting Rights and Terrorism in the South

The author places the success of the Voting Rights Bill of 1965 in the hands of the Federal Government. It is stated that the only way the Negros will truly feel the effects of the bill is if the government does its part to enforce it.

Letter from Indian Agency to Harper & Row

Thursday, March 16, 1967

In this letter, the writer requests permission to translate Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait" into Marahati, one of the regional languages in India. The author mentions that some of the social problems in India are similar problems "the Negro" faced in the United States.

SCLC Meeting Agenda

Dr. King notes agenda items to cover with the SCLC staff, including improving organization within the SCLC, finances and upcoming programs.

Sin (Isaiah)

Dr. King highlights the topic of sin, according to the Book of Isaiah.

Letter from Marian R. Johnson to MLK

Thursday, February 22, 1968

Mrs. Johnson expresses her concern regarding the potential threats to undermine Dr. King's Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C.

Civilian Review Board in New York City

Friday, July 31, 1964

The author asserts that the New York community should initiate a new program by the Unity Council to include the appointment of an independent Civilian Review Board. This tactic is thought to bring peace and tranquility to the community.

Letter from Eunice Janousek to MLK

Saturday, June 1, 1963

Eunice Janousek requests that Dr. King review materials in the matter of the Blakey case with the hope that he can provide assistance to those who are being oppressed in South Dakota.

Schleiermacher & Ritschl

Dr. King writes notes regarding the philosophies of German theologians Friedrich Schleiermacher and Albrecht Ritschl. King states there is a mixture of attraction and repulsion between the two, as Ritschl is repelled by Schleiermacher's mysticism and attracted to his views on Christianity.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, May 22, 1964

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that the British Broadcasting Company wants to read extracts from "Strength to Love" in their "First Day of the Week" program.

Statement by MLK

Friday, October 14, 1966

In this statement, Dr. King enforces the mission and organizational structure of the SCLC as a means of denouncing the traditional ideas associated with the "Black Power" slogan.

Kierkegaard

Dr. King quotes Soren Kierkegaard's "Einübung im Christentum" ["Practice in Christianity"].

Transformed Nonconformists Sermon Outline

In this brief outline for a sermon based on Romans 12:2, Dr. King asserts that Christians are citizens of two worlds, those of time and eternity. They are in the world, but not of it. In a generation of the mass mind, they are called to live differently – to make history not be made by history. But nonconformity in itself is not good; there must be a mental transformation. The world is on the brink of moral and physical destruction and the need of the hour is for nonconformists to materialism, nationalism and militarism.

God's Existence

Dr. King cites Paul Tillich's perception of God's existence. This ideology is a Christological paradox for God "is being-itself" and beyond the essence of existence.

Messianic Age (Haggai)

Dr. King makes reference to the Biblical governor Zerubbabel. The specific passage to which Dr. King refers reads, "On that day, says the Lord of Hosts, I will take you Zerubbabel, son of Shealtiel, my servant, and wear you like a signet ring; for it is you whom I have chosen. This is the word of the Lord of Hosts" (Hag. 2:23).

Letter from Alfredo Gomez Gil to MLK

Sheila M. Rogers writes Dr. King in place of her friend Alfredo Gil, who has written a poem in Spanish about the plight of blacks. Rogers has translated the poem and sent it to Dr. King in support of the work he is doing for blacks in the United States.

Letter from Anonymous to MLK

Monday, February 5, 1968

The author of this letter expresses their concern about poverty across the United States and offers suggestions for Negros to build their own communities.

Athanasius, St.

Dr. King records a short biography of the theologian St. Athanasius, identifying him as the defender of the Nicene faith.

Letter from Patricia Reid to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967

Patricia Reid has mixed feelings about Dr. King and the position he has taken. Even though she and her husband agree with this stance on civil rights, they respectfully disagree on his position on the Vietnam War. The Reids believe that Dr. King shouldn't interfere with foreign policy unless he can come up with a viable solution to end the Vietnam War. However, they still feel compelled to contribute to the work of the SCLC, but warn Dr. King that other individuals may not be that sympathetic.

Letter from Grace Newman to Rev. Abernathy

Saturday, April 27, 1968

Ms. Grace Newman, National Chairman of the Fort Hood Three Defense Committee, informs Rev. Abernathy of her support of his leadership in SCLC. In honor of her pledge to Dr. King, she promises to continue working to organize poor communities in Puerto Rico.

Letter from Anwar Katib to MLK

Sunday, January 22, 1967

Anwar Katib, the Governor of Jerusalem, states that he is pleased to hear about Dr. King's decision to lead a pilgrimage to the Holy Land. He also tells Dr. King that his visit will be a blessing and a historical event.

Letter from John Mannix to MLK

Thursday, July 11, 1963

John Mannix, Chairman of the Program Committee, invites Dr. King to speak for the Junior Bar Section of the Bar Association of the District of Columbia.

Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech

Thursday, December 10, 1964

This version of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech is typed in all capitals, probably to make it easier to read from while delivering the speech.