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Letter from John Vannorsdall to Dora McDonald

Monday, September 25, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA)

Gettysburg College Chaplain, Mr. Vannorsdall, writes Ms. McDonald concerning the grounds of Dr. King's travel arrangements to speak at the college. He reassures Ms. McDonald of Dr. King's minimal travel time and further discloses his accommodations.

Guidelines for a Constructive Church

Sunday, June 5, 1966
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL)

In this sermon delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Dr. King spells out guidelines for the church: healing the broken-hearted, preaching deliverance to the captive (freeing people from everything that enslaves), and preaching the acceptable year of the Lord. The acceptable year of the Lord, he says, is every year the time is right to do right, stop lying and cheating, do justice, learn to live as brothers and beat swords into plowshares.

Worship

Dr. King discusses the danger of subjective religion without objective religion.

Letter from David Joel to MLK

Friday, January 12, 1968

In this letter, Joel writes Dr. King requesting assistance with a term paper on "Black Power". Joel is a sophomore at Briarcliff High School and is writing a term paper for his World History course. He hopes that King can offer a more clear explanation of the "Negro situation" and he also includes specific questions for King to answer.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. Harold L. Sawyer

Friday, June 26, 1964
Ohio (OH)

Miss McDonald informs Rev. Sawyer that he finds it difficult to schedule appointments more than three months in advance due to his hectic schedule, and cannot accept his invitation to speak at Hiram College at this time.

Letter from Rev. Andrew T. Denholm to MLK

Wednesday, March 17, 1965
CANADA, Atlanta, GA, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

Rev. Andrew Denholm of St. Paul's United Church in Paris, Ontario send Dr. King a financial contribution and inquires about the need of northern whites for the march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama. He also inquires about the possibility of a civil rights worker addressing a group of people in his town.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Eisendrath

Friday, September 29, 1967
New York, NY, Chicago, IL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, ISRAEL

In this letter, Dr. King writes to Dr. Eisendrath to clarify SCLC's view on anti-Semitism. Dr. King explains that neither he nor his organization support any resolution calling for black separatism or the condemnation of Israel. He identifies oil as the primary issue in the region and maintains the only way to relieve the tensions between the Middle East and the United States is through peaceful solutions.

Letter from Sidney Eisenberger to MLK

Wednesday, December 20, 1961
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Sidney Eisenberger sends a donation and words of encouragement to Dr. King. He praises Dr. King's work, particularly the focus on political involvement. He humorously writes that he hopes that he will one day be so unconscious of color that he will "feel free to regard a negro auto driver with the same venomous hatred I give to white drivers."

Telegram from MLK to Andrew Heiskell and A. Philip Randolph

Washington, D.C.

Dr. King informs Mr. Heiskell and Mr. Randolph that he will not be able to attend the emergency convocation. He also notes why this convocation is needed.

Newspaper Article - South May Hold Best Hope for Martin King

New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, VIETNAM

This newspaper article describes efforts of Dr. King in seeking aid for Negroes in Northern cities slum areas and the formation of a third political party to run in the 1968 Presidential Elections.

War

Dr. King quotes the views of Italian politician Benito Mussolini, English public intellectual John Ruskin, and Nazi politician Dr. Robert Ley on war and its relationship to masculinity.

Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee

Wednesday, May 1, 1963
Virginia (VA), Albany, GA, Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS), Arkansas (AR), Alabama (AL), North Carolina (NC), Washington, D.C., McComb, MS, Greenwood, MS

This pamphlet details the history, programs and purpose of The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

Letter from Jim Robert Davis to MLK

Chicago, IL

Jim Robert Davis tells Dr. King how his presence in Chicago's Lawndale community have caused many of his fellow neighbors to clean their neighborhood. He pens a small but inspriational poem under the subject "The Glory of Blackmen."

MLK Address to a North Carolina Branch of the NAACP

Sunday, September 25, 1960
North Carolina (NC), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King addresses a public meeting of Charlotte, North Carolina's NAACP branch. He lists five actions the Negro can do to assist America with realizing the dream. The Negro must challenge the system of segregation, make efforts to gain ballots, and sacrifice to achieve freedom.

People to People: Something Happening in Mississippi

Saturday, October 17, 1964
Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Texas (TX), Atlantic City, NJ

In this article for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King discusses the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, a group of Negroes from Mississippi who displayed the power of nonviolence by challenging the seating of the state's all-white regular Democratic delegation at the 1964 Democratic Convention.

Letter from E. F. S. Davies to MLK

Friday, July 16, 1965
Richmond, VA, Virginia (VA), New York (NY)

E. F. S. Davies, Head of the Department of Philosophy at Virginia State College, writes Dr. King regarding A. J. Muste's civil rights efforts in the 1930's and 1940's.

Is It Wrong to Segregate?

Sunday, June 5, 1960
Atlanta, GA, Illinois (IL), ETHIOPIA, Texas (TX), CUBA

This Sermon titled "Is It Wrong to Segregate?" was delivered by the Reverend A. L. Kendrick on June 5, 1960. He expounds on several topics including equal rights, communism and the political element of the government.

Letter from Richard C. Gilman to MLK

Tuesday, July 5, 1966
Los Angeles, CA

Richard C. Gilman, President of Occidental College, invites Dr. King to speak to the students at their opening convocation.

Letter from Dorothy O. Bucklin to MLK

Wednesday, November 27, 1963
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, New York (NY), Wisconsin (WI), Pennsylvania (PA)

Mrs. Bucklin invites Dr. King to deliver a series of sermons highlighting his biblical preference and his experiences with the SCLC. The conference will host affiliates of the American Baptist Home Mission Societies.

Letter from MLK to Edwin C. Berry

Tuesday, August 30, 1966
Chicago, IL

Dr. King thanks Edwin Berry of the Council of Coordinating Organizations for presenting the Rosa Parks Award to Al Raby at the annual SCLC convention.

Santayana

Dr. King records George Santayana’s poem, “Oh World, Thou Choosest Not the Better Part!”

War and Pacifism

New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King examines War and Pacifism. He determines that absolute pacifism is not acceptable, but neither is war. He cites several different philosophies of pacifism and nonviolence set forth by such figures as Nels Ferre, John H. Hallowell, A. J. Muste and Mahatma Gandhi.

Letter from Jerome S. Ozer to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967
New York, NY

Mr. Ozer informs Dr. King that his organization will be publishing "Eyewitness: The Negro in American History" by William Loren Katz, which covers the Negro in every aspect of American life. He then requests that Dr. King write an introduction for the book.

Letter from MLK to W. Russell Chapman of the NAACP

Thursday, February 1, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak from the York County NAACP.

Telegram from Al C. Hastings to MLK

Tuesday, October 31, 1967
Alabama (AL), Florida (FL)

Al Hastings expresses his concern during Dr. King's incarceration in the Jefferson County Jail.

Letter from Southern Negro Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration to Henry Brownell

Wednesday, January 11, 1956
Washington, D.C.

The Southern Negro Leaders Conference on Transportation and Nonviolent Integration request a conference with U.S. Attorney General Brownell to discuss the federal government's plans.

The Sound of Freedom

Wednesday, October 7, 1964
Philadelphia, PA

The Greater Philadelphia Citizens Committee presents The Sound of Freedom to "demonstrate Philadelphia unity" where Dr. King is the guest speaker.

Letter from Ora Belle Tamm to MLK

Tuesday, March 14, 1967

Ora Belle Tamm objects to the reaction of Negro leaders during the Adam Clayton Powell affair and expresses her disappointment to Dr. King.

Telegram from L. V. Booth and Otis Moss to MLK

Cincinnati, OH, Ohio (OH)

Dr. L. V. Booth and Reverend Otis Moss thank Dr. King and the SCLC for their efforts during the last ten years.

Letter from Marshall C. Dendy to the SCLC

Monday, October 23, 1967
Virginia (VA), Atlanta, GA

In this document dated 10/23/1967, Marshall C. Dandy writes to Dr. King and the rest of the SCLC, enclosed is a check from "A Fellowship of Concern".