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Letter from Vice President Hubert Humphrey to MLK Regarding Crisis in Detroit

Thursday, August 3, 1967

In this letter, Vice President of the United States of America, Hubert Humphrey, writes to Dr. King to thank him for his statements promoting nonviolence in the crisis situation in Detroit, Michigan.

Letter from "A Red Blooded American Who Is Opposed to Your Tactics of Un-Americanism"

Thursday, April 27, 1967

This letter to Dr. King criticizes his presumed anti-American activities. The author, who signs as "A Red Blooded American who is opposed to your tactics of un-Americanism," describes herself as the mother and grandmother of men who have served in the armed forces.

Letter from Betty D. Richardson to MLK

Wednesday, February 22, 1967

Betty Richardson reminds Dr. King of his speaking engagement for the American Friends Service Committee 50th Anniversary Dinner.

Letter from A.J. Hoffman to MLK

Thursday, April 27, 1967

In this letter, A.J. Hoffman offers a few words of admiration to Dr. King for his work for the "brotherhood of man."

Correspondence: Letter from Joan Daves to MLK- October 14, 1963

Monday, October 14, 1963

Here Mr. Daves advises Dr. King to accept an offer presented to him for the Dutch rights of his novel "Strength to Love" then references two copies of the proposed contractual agreement.

Letter from Randolph Blackwell to Greene, Ayers, Swigert & Cluster

Thursday, March 31, 1966

Randolph T. Blackwell responds to the gentlemen of Greene, Ayers, Swiger & Cluster concerning a previous issue.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King cites Vergilius Ferm’s “First Chapters in Religious Philosophy.”

Resolution from the Richmond Baptist Association Ministers Conference

Monday, April 8, 1968

This resolution, adopted by the Richmond Baptist Association Ministers Conference, condemns the brutal assassination of Dr. King.

SCLC Mail Log: February 28, 1968

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

This mail log exemplifies the large quantity of correspondence that the SCLC received daily, as well as the method that they devised to deal with it. The mail log for this day shows a variety of types of correspondence, including invitations, invoices, contributions, and personal letters from friends and colleagues.

Desegregation and the Future

Saturday, December 15, 1956

This document contains the first eight pages of Dr. King's address at the annual luncheon of the National Committee for Rural Schools at New York's Commodore Hotel in 1956. In it, he condemns segregation as an evil which has been allowed to exist in American life for too many decades. Dr. King points out that many states now stand in opposition to desegregation, and the federal government and the Supreme Court must now face how to make this new legislation a reality.

Letter from Claudia Grams to MLK

Friday, November 15, 1963

Claudia Grams, a junior at Central High School in La Crosse, Wisconsin, has chosen Dr. King for her junior exposition project and writes him requesting information on his earlier life. She expresses how Dr. King's book, "Stride Toward Freedom," has inspired her and she inquires about how her organization can support his movement.

Tritheism

Dr. King notes the definition of tritheism.

Letter from Peter P. Bland to MLK

Sunday, April 3, 1966

Peter Bland seeks Dr. King's autograph to add to his collection.

Telegram from King Family to Mrs. Lucille Anderson

The King family sends its condolences to Mrs. Anderson.

"University Plans 'Liberties' Program"

Monday, February 21, 1966

Experts at Columbia University plan to adopt a program that will make the meaning of American liberties more relatable to students.

Transcripts for Courses at Harvard University

Thursday, August 13, 1953

Lois Ryan forwards a transcript for two courses that Dr. King took while studying at Harvard University. These courses were Philosophy of Plate: Introductory and The Philosophy of Whitehead.

Letter from MLK to Richmond M. Rudden

Thursday, January 26, 1967

Dr. King writes Richmond M. Rudden to decline an invitation to speak at Lafayette College due to upcoming non-violence workshops, voter registration drives and SCLC fundraising activities.

Letter from James K. Mbuguah from MLK

Wednesday, January 17, 1962

James Mbuguah is a young boy from Kenya who has been accepted into John Hopkins University. James is contacting Dr. King because he does not have the finances to attend the school and would like to receive assistance.

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Friday, July 13, 1962

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General of the Dept. of Justice, responds to Dr. King's telegram requesting a Federal investigation concerning an incident involving Mr. Toomes Clendon and Sheriff W. E. Hammond. In closing, Marshall assures the Reverend that appropriate action will be taken should a violation be involved.

Letter from Steve Delaney to William P. Lampkin

Monday, August 9, 1965

Steve Delaney, Assistant New Director for WSOC, writes William Lampkin regarding Dr. King's visit to Montreat, North Carolina. Delaney thanks Lampkin for providing updates about the visit and also asks for additional information about Dr. King's planned speech.

Letter from Johann R. Goelz to MLK

Tuesday, May 7, 1963

Johann R. Goelz highlights the spiritual irony that Dr. King's has the same name of the historical Martin Luther. Mr. Goelz served as a former Lutheran pastor in Germany and expounds on the religious realities of Jesus Christ.

Letter from Congressman Lionel Van Deerlin to MLK

Monday, August 30, 1965

Congressman Lionel Van Deerlin, the 37th district Representative from California, thanks Dr. King for the telegram urging him to sign the discharge petition for the home rule bill for the District of Columbia, and he lets Dr. King know he has already signed it.

History: Ecclesiastes

Dr. King examines the "author's philosophy of history" recorded in the biblical text Ecclesiastes 1:9. He notes that Ecclesiastes' view of history as "a series of endless cycles which has no underlying theology" is in stark contrast to general Bible philosophy, and is more in line with a Greek view of history.

Letter from Brigitte Horburger to MLK

Brigitte Horburger sends Dr. King a photograph of a black child and white child playing the piano together. Under the photograph it states, "To produce real harmony you must play both the black and white keys."

Letter from Richard Boone Regarding Child Development Program in Mississippi

Thursday, February 2, 1967

Richard Boone, Executive Director of Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty, encloses a news release regarding the upcoming opening of the Child Development Group of Mississippi.

Sentinel: "King's Book Refutes Black Power"

Thursday, June 22, 1967

This document is a newspaper clipping from the Los Angeles Sentinel,l giving a review of Dr. King's book, Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community. Headlined under the title, "King's Book Refutes Black Power", the book review places special emphasis on Dr. King's objection of black power as a slogan. In his book, Dr. King informed his readers that the paths of black and white individuals intersected towards equality and black power totally killed that process.

Letter from Daniel F. Byrne to MLK

Wednesday, September 14, 1966

Lieutenant Colonel Daniel F. Byrne, an army chaplain from the 24th Infantry Division, requests a copy of the address Dr. King gave to the World Conference of Churches in Switzerland.

Letter from Mary L. Bryant to MLK

Mary L. Bryant writes Dr. King seeking help. She is a mother of eight and in desperate need of used clothes for her children. Her appeal comes as a result of financial hardship due to covering the medical expenses of a child with a serious illness.

Index card written by MLK regarding Faith

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines another thinker's insights on the subject of faith. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for quick reference to quotations, ideas, and bible verses, among other things. Material covered on these index cards includes topics such as theology, philosophy, and history. Some material from these reference notes would later emerge in his speeches and sermons.

Evil

Dr. King outlines his views on evil and categorizes it into three types.