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National Citizens' Commission Report to Congress

Tuesday, September 19, 1967
Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C.

Urban Development Coordinator Shelby Southard, of the Cooperative League of the USA, sends Dr. King a copy of this report to Congress recommending improved foreign aid for urban development. Southard helped author the report, entitled the "National Citizens' Commission on Urban Development." It emphasizes unrest caused by "deplorable social conditions" in cities around the world, and seeks to improve urban development planning.

Address by MLK at Golden Anniversary Conference of National Urban League

Tuesday, September 6, 1960
New York, NY, NIGERIA, SOUTH AFRICA, LIBERIA, ETHIOPIA, INDIA, Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King gives an address at the National Urban Leagues's Golden Anniversary Conference in New York City. He speaks on the subject, "The Rising Tide of Racial Consciousness" and discusses the Negroes new sense of "somebodiness." The factors that contribute to this new sense of dignity include a population shift from rural to urban life, rapid educational advance, gradual improvement of economic status, Supreme Court decisions outlawing segregation in the public schools, and awareness that freedom is a part of a world-wide struggle.

Letter from William G. Broaddus to MLK

Wednesday, August 30, 1967
Virginia (VA), Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

The Editor of the Dicta column from The Virginia Law Weekly writes Dr. King to request a contribution to their "Law for the Poor" series. Mr. Broaddus states that an ideal article will discuss landlord tenant problems and offer solutions. He tells Dr. King that his work in Chicago "on the landlord tenant problem...[makes you] well qualified to write on this subject."

Letter from MLK to Saul S. Sherman

Monday, January 3, 1966
Illinois (IL)

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Mrs. Saul S. Sherman for her contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He writes how monumental the change for Negroes in the South has been in the last ten years and how revolutionary the future will be thanks to her generous donation.

Letter from President Johnson to MLK on Voting Rights

Thursday, March 18, 1965
Washington, D.C.

President Johnson offers his gratitude to Dr. King for supporting his advocacy before Congress of legislation guaranteeing universal voting rights.

Adverse Letter from an Anonymous Sender

An unknown sender states their concerns about the direction Dr. King is leading the movement.

Telegram from Robert J. Brown to MLK

Robert J. Brown writes Dr. King with prayerful wishes, encouraging strength in his fight for civil rights.

Telegram from Rev. Phillip J. Bailey to MLK

Monday, September 22, 1958
New York (NY), New York, NY

Rev. Bailey, on behalf of the Interdenominational Ministers Meeting of Greater New York, wishes Dr. King well in his recovery.

B. Clifton Reardon Recap of William Temple

London, England, New York (NY)

This is an essay written by B. Clifton Reardon on William Temple, the Archbishop of Canterbury. Temple was one of the founding members of the Council of Christians and Jews.

Answer to a Perplexing Question

Sunday, March 3, 1963
Atlanta, GA, South Africa, ISRAEL

Dr. King preaches about faith, based on Matthew 17:14-20, and applies it to the Civil Rights Movement. He defines faith as cooperating with God by surrendering to God's will so that His strength may act freely through us. He asserts that faith, intellect, and work must blend together.

Letter from Rev. Robert Hoggard of Grace Cathedral to Dora McDonald

Thursday, February 18, 1965
San Francisco, CA, Atlanta, GA

Reverend Robert Hoggard, of Grace Cathderal in San Francisco, contacts Dora McDonald with the hope that Dr. King will be able to preach for their congregation on March 28, 1965.

Letter from Lucille Banta to MLK

Thursday, October 27, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM, JAPAN, Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

In addition to a financial contribution, Lucille Banta sends Dr. King a proposal for the civil rights and peace movements to oppose the Vietnam War. She suggests that they work together to "plan and organize a nationwide United Peace and Freedom Parade to Washington."

Letter from Joan Daves Requesting the Table of Contents for "Where Do We Go From Here"

Monday, December 19, 1966
New York, NY

Here Joan Daves requests a table of contents for Dr. King's "Where Do We Go From Here" in order to write a description for the catalog.

Letter from MLK to Rev. H. Edward Whitaker

Tuesday, April 3, 1962
New York (NY)

Dr. King responds to a letter from Rev. Edward Whitaker, regarding Whitaker's desire to be a college minster. He expresses to Whitaker that his experience should serve him well for such a responsibility. Dr. King and Rev. Whitaker were classmates at Crozer Theological Seminary.

MLK on Student Sit-Ins

Friday, April 15, 1960
North Carolina (NC)

Dr. King applauds the students participating in sit-in demonstrations and states that the leaders must develop a strategy for victory. He suggests topics for discussion including: creating an organization, a nationwide selective buying campaign, training for jail not bail, further exploration of nonviolence, and taking the freedom struggle into every community without exception. These suggestions led to the formation of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).

DeWolf, Harold

New York (NY)

Dr. King references Harold DeWolf's book, "A Theology of the Living Church."

Letter from Marvin T. Robinson to MLK

Saturday, January 21, 1967
California (CA)

In this letter, Pastor Robinson of Friendship Baptist Church in Pasadena, sends Dr. King a $200 contribution from Mr. Hayakwa.

A Look To The Future

Monday, September 2, 1957
Tennessee (TN), EGYPT, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

For the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Highlander Folk School, Dr. King delivers the speech "A Look To The Future." He uses a timeline to explain the adversities African Americans endured to gain recognition as American citizens. He also points out the efforts of the Ku Klux Klan and the White Citizens Councils to make African Americans second class citizens. Lastly, Dr. King points out that America should be more maladjusted in order to avoid failing to cope with the demands of the normal social environment.

Official Program of the Spring Mobilization

The following document is an official program listing the schedule of the Spring Mobilization on April 15, 1967.

Invitation to the 16th Annual Convention for the Synod of Toronto and Kingston Presbyterian Young People'e Society

Wednesday, January 13, 1965
CANADA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Jack Green and David Powell invite Dr. King to speak at the 16th Annual Convention for the Synod of Toronto and Kingston Presbyterian Young People's Society. The theme of the convention is "First They Gave Themselves." CBC National Television Network has offered to televise Dr. King's speech.

Material to Use Regarding Negro Leaders and Platform Committee

Missouri (MO), California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Bayard Rustin sends Dr. King this pre-written answer to be used if the media ask why Dr. King and A. Philip Randolph are not together during the march before the 1960 Democratic National Convention in Los Angeles. The statement explains that Randolph will be in St. Louis to address the campaign to elect the first Negro Senator.

Justification

Dr. King quotes Albrecht Ritschl as he discusses the concept of justification and its relationship to sin, guilt and salvation.

Letter to Rev. MLK, Sr. from Arlen Fuhlendorf

Monday, April 8, 1968
Texas (TX)

Mrs. Arlen Fuhlendorkr writes to Rev. King Sr., expressing deep sympathy for the death of Dr. King. She also wanted to convey to Rev. King that he should be proud of the great work his son did for humanity.

Letter from Philip Watson to MLK

Monday, December 21, 1964
NORWAY, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Mr. Watson praises Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and describes the award as a "global testimony" to Dr. King's leadership.

Telegram from George W. Collins to MLK

Wednesday, January 26, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Alderman George Collins welcomes Dr. King to Chicago and also issues an invitation for Dr. King to visit his office at any time.

Invitation for the Inauguration of Hugh Morris Gloster

Atlanta, GA

This is an invitation for the Inauguration of the seventh president of Morehouse College.

Draft of MLK's An Open Letter to Negro Youth

Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, Chicago, IL, Birmingham, AL

In an open letter to Negro Youths, Dr. King urges them to stay committed to the nonviolent principles of social change in their plight to gain broad access to education and employment.

Integration Details in Wilcox County

Thursday, December 22, 1966
Alabama (AL), Washington, D.C., Michigan (MI)

On September 23, 1966, Wilcox County School in Alabama was integrated. However, the amount of "physical acts" and "extreme brutality" directed towards the Negro students was so great that the parents of the students prohibited their children from attending just a few months later. In this report, Robert L. Green, the Education Consultant to the SCLC, outlines the details of this event to Mr. John Doar of the U.S. Justice Department. He tells Mr.

Augustinanism

Dr. King writes notes on Saint Augustine, Bishop of Hippo, and his "vast theological system" called Augustinianism. Dr. King describes the system as a comprehensive church philosophy that was very pessimistic about the nature of man.

The Eternality of God Verses The Temporality of Man

This document is an outline of the sermon titled "The Eternality of God Versus the Temporality of Man." In the first two sections, Dr. King contrasts the time-conditioned nature of man with God, who transcends time. The final portion highlights a significant fact that God is absolute and unchangeable.