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Statement on Penance for Violence in Albany, Georgia

Monday, July 30, 1962
Albany, GA

Dr. King calls for a day of penance that will serve as a tactic of the self-purification step of the nonviolence method. Dr. King urges for the City Commission to talk with leaders of the Albany Movement.

The Southern Patriot: Today's Hero The Negro Child

New Orleans, LA

This column highlights the brave children who endured the hardships of hostile mobs as they blazed the trail for school integration.

The Birth of a New Nation

GHANA, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King compares the ongoing civil rights struggle in the United States to the Hebrews' Exodus from Egypt.

Letter from Christine Schulty to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Christine Schulty offers condolences to Mrs. King after the assassination of Dr. King.

Proposal for Chicago Schools

Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL, Virginia (VA)

This agenda outlines a strategic boycott of Chicago schools. The information is separated by three individual phases.

Letter from N. M. Nel to MLK

Thursday, March 17, 1966
SOUTH AFRICA, New Orleans, LA, Atlanta, GA

N. M. Nel writes to inform Dr. King that his visa application for South Africa has been denied.

Berkeley, George

Dr. King notes Berkeley's views on metaphysics.

Letter from MLK to Victoria Gist

Dr. King apologizes for a belated reply and says he hopes the State Youth Congress meeting was successful. King was invited to be banquet speaker.

Telegram from Alexander Edelmann to MLK

Nebraska (NE), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Alexander Edelmann, a professor from the University of Nebraska, criticizes Dr. King for not taking a stance against black rioters in Atlanta. Edelmann mentions the he once was a supporter of Dr. King, but now considers him "irresponsible."

Program of the Chicago Freedom Movement

Chicago, IL

The SCLC and the Coordinating Council of Community Organizations (CCCO) issues a program addressing the goals of the Chicago Freedom Movement. The Chicago Freedom Movement is composed of a coalition of organizations who have decided to eradicate slums, ghettos and racism from the city.

Letter from Laurence V. Kirkpatrick to MLK

Wednesday, May 12, 1965

The Program Committee of the World Convention of Churches of Christ requests Dr. King for the delivery of a major address at the Seventh Assembly in Puerto Rico. Laurence V. Kirkpatrick, the acting general secretary and friend of Reverend Andrew Young, contacts Dr. King to inquire about the status of the original invitation because the organization has yet to receive a response.


Dr. King outlines principles of Hegel's philosophy regarding rationality and reality.

Letter from Gus Zucco to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, October 16, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA

Gus Zucco, Director of Public Information for Cedar Crest College, writes Dora McDonald stating, "we are withholding any further announcement regarding Dr. King's visit with us" in hopes that he could reschedule.

Rules of Procedure

Tuesday, April 19, 1955

The National Council of the Churches of Christ is a unified body of Christian faith groups. Presented here is an organized contract outlining the official rules of procedure for the Department of Racial and Cultural Relations.

Letter from Pastor H. Edward Whitaker to MLK

Thursday, March 22, 1962
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Boston, MA

Whitaker, a former classmate at Crozer Theological Seminary, request's Dr. King's advice concerning a new ministry position at a Southern State College.

Advertisement for Why We Can't Wait

This advertisement for Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait," appeared in the Christian Herald in June of 1964.

Letter From D. Parke Gibson to MLK

Wednesday, July 24, 1963
Georgia (GA), New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

D. Parke Gibson informs Dr. King that they will be working with International Correspondence Schools. Gibson also feels that home study education could "lead to upgrading of many Negro workers."

Western Union Telegram from Mr. and Mrs. Count Basie to Dr. King

New York (NY)

Famous jazz musician, Count Basie and his wife Catherine, sent Dr. King this Western Union telegram, following Dr. King's nearly fatal 1958 stabbing in Harlem. The Basie family, offered Dr. King any assistance he may have needed during his recovery.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. William Machesney

Tuesday, January 9, 1962
California (CA)

Dr. King communicates with Mrs. William Machesney of Compton, California regarding her letter about children who need help. Dr. King recommends that Machesney pursue her initiative and encourages her to solicit the support of the State of California.

Telegram to MLK from the Dogwood Tree

Tuesday, May 2, 1967
Ohio (OH), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King receives a telegram of support from "The Dogwood Tree." The telegram conveys that "the orthodox Jewish religion is working for you. Keep your faith...."

Letter from Great St. Mary's

Monday, January 18, 1965
Massachusetts (MA), London, England

Hugh Montefiore informs Dr. King that he is awaiting a response to an earlier letter. Montefiore had hoped that Dr. King could preach in an effort to "fix up" some local ministers.

Herbert Hill Statement Before the House Committee on Education and Labor

Friday, August 17, 1962

Herbert Hill, National Labor Director for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, addresses the House Committee on Education and Labor regarding the questionable practices conducted by the leadership of the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union.

Letter from Audrey Mizer to MLK

Sunday, December 3, 1961
Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH, Atlanta, GA, CHINA, New York (NY)

Audrey Mizer encourages Dr. King to continue his good works because "the world cannot be robbed of any good." Mizer then discusses her opposing views to a statement in a Christian Monitor Column regarding Red China's admission to the United Nations.

Letter of Response from Clarence B. Jones to J. Saba Alexander

Wednesday, April 17, 1968
New York, NY, Brooklyn, NY

Clarence Jones responds to Alexander's letter requesting action steps to create an interfaith chapel and memorial library in honor of Dr. King. Jones agrees with the great loss and likewise pledges to continue the work.

Letter from Clair Callan to MLK

Thursday, January 7, 1965
Nebraska (NE), Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA

Representative Callan of Nebraska writes Dr. King to thank him for his recent telegram regarding the Mississippi Congressional Delegation. After giving serious consideration to Dr. King's recommendation to vote against seating the Mississippi Congressman, Callan states that he came to the conclusion that "a refusal to seat the Delegation in question would not further the cause of the Negro in that state," and consequently voted for the seating.

Letter from Clark Foreman to MLK

Wednesday, October 21, 1964
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Clark Foreman, Director of the Emergency Civil Liberties Committee, congratulates Dr. King on winning the Nobel Peace Prize. Mr. Foreman also asks Dr. King to send a message of congratulations to Dr. James A. Dombrowski, who will receive the Tom Paine Award at the 1964 Bill of Rights Dinner. Dombrowski, a Methodist minister, was co-founder of the Highlander Folk School in Tennessee.

Letter Regarding MLK

Wednesday, February 21, 1968
Kentucky (KY)

This letter from Dad to Frank and Mark commends Dr. Kings use of the 'march' as means to secure a better life for the Negro. The author goes on to say the integration benefits both the Negro and whites in the supply and demand of labor.


Dr. King records several scriptures from the biblical Book of Jeremiah.

A Letter to Meredith

Thursday, March 14, 1963
Mississippi (MS), New York, NY

In "A Letter To Meredith" Dr. King discusses the challenges faced by James Meredith as a student at the University of Mississippi. -

Great Man

Gene Lyle writes the editor of a newspaper article entitled "Americans Need Some Discipline" to address unjustified criticism expressed against Dr. King. The author is certain that the article persuaded some readers that Dr. King "is to be feared and despised" for being a contributor to civil unrest. However, the writer predicts that "Dr. King will enter American one of the great men of all time."