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Telegram from MLK to John F. Kennedy

Tuesday, June 11, 1963

Dr. King writes to President John F. Kennedy about the President's speech to the nation. Dr. King writes that he found the speech to be most eloquent and unequivocal.

Dexter Avenue Baptist Church Annual Report, 1955-1956

This report contains vital information concerning the organizational structure, services, and members of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church. Dr. King provides a heartfelt address to the Montgomery, AL congregation as he seeks to extend the church's influence throughout the community amidst his growing involvement in the Civil Rights Movement.

Agenda for the Leadership Conference Executive Committee Meeting

Arnold Aronson sends the agenda for an upcoming meeting for the Executive Committee of the Leadership Conference. Important topics of discussion include the Civil Rights Act of 1967 and the Freedom Budget.

Letter from Ms. Dora McDonald to Mr. Robert Green

Monday, January 22, 1968

In this letter, Ms. Dora McDonald tells Dr. Robert Green that Dr. King has approved Dr. Green's forward for the "Famous American Series."

MLK Manuscript: Why We Can't Wait

This document reflects one page of the original manuscript of "Why We Can't Wait." "Why We Can't Wait" is a book by Martin Luther King, Jr. about the civil rights struggle against racial segregation in the United States, and specifically in Birmingham, Alabama.

1966 Notes on the War

Dr. King annotates a speech to address his concerns about the war in Vietnam and his duties as a civil rights leader.

Letter from Coretta Scott King to Judy Richardson

Mrs. King expresses her support for the SNCC's Negro History Primer program. She also provides Miss Richardson with her contact information so that a later meeting can be arranged.

Plans for Progress: Atlanta Survey

The Southern Regional Council releases a special report regarding Atlanta's "Plans for Progress," a program that gives the President's Committee on Equal Employment Opportunity power to require contractors to eliminate discrimination in the workplace. According to a study, only three of the twenty-four firms appeared to be interested in abiding by the "Plans for Progress." These were Lockheed, Western Electric Company, and Goodyear.

Letter from Dennis Crawford to MLK

Monday, May 25, 1964

Dennis Crawford, Executive Secretary of the YMCA-YWCA, invites Dr. King to the first Northwest Collegiate Civil Rights Conference. In addition, Crawford makes mention of their contributions to the movement in the form of students, money, books and community leadership.

Telegram from MLK to Albert Shanker

Dr. King expresses his full support of the United Federation of Teachers in their effort to improve their living and working conditions.

Field Foundation Station on the Death of MLK

Friday, April 5, 1968

A portion of the statement on the death of Dr. King from the Field Foundations states, "As at other times of national shame and self-despair, what is at issue now is how ell we as a nation shall respond morally and politically." The heart of this statement reminds readers that the "ugly scars of racism and poverty will not be eliminated in this country until the people will it to be done."

Letter from the American Committee on Africa Regarding South Africa's Participation in the Olympics

Thursday, January 11, 1968

George M. Houser, Executive Director of the American Committee on Africa, informs readers of the International Olympic Committee's upcoming meeting that will discuss the 1968 Olympics. Mr. Houser encloses a paper regarding the history of South Africa and the Olympics to help urge the committee to reconsider granting South Africa permission to participate in the Olympics.

Letter from Warrington Allsop to MLK

Monday, October 6, 1958

During the fall of 1958, Dr. King was stabbed by an African American woman during a book signing in Harlem, an event that nearly cost him his life. Following this event, Warrington Allsop sends his support and well-wishes for Dr. King's immediate recovery.

Letter from MLK to R. B. Taylor

Wednesday, October 13, 1965

Dr. King thanks Dr. R. B. Taylor for his generous contribution to the SCLC. King discusses how the funds are allocated to assist with voter registration, education and finding jobs for blacks.

May 17 -- 11 Years Later

Saturday, May 22, 1965

Dr. King discusses the eleven years since the Supreme Court ruled that segregated schools were not constitutional in Brown v. Board of Education. He explains that it was not until the Civil Rights Act of 1964 that people began to understand the harms of segregation.

February 1968, Ms. Alma Davis of the A.M.E. Church of Alabama, writes to announce the endorsment of Reverend S. M. Sam Davis at their candidate for bishop.

Wednesday, January 31, 1968

Ms. Alma Davis of the A.M.E. Church of Alabama, annouces Reverend S. M. Sam Davis as their candidate for bishop. As a member of the Davis Boosters' Club, she attempts to solicit support for Reverend Davis. The Boosters' Club will feature Mrs. Lucinda Brown Pobey and Mrs. Willie Mae bell in a special financial event.

Letter from the Ford Foundation to Chauncey Eskridge

Tuesday, October 17, 1967

A member of the Ford Foundation informs the Executive Director of the Southern Christian Leadership Foundation, Chauncey Eskridge, that the Ford Foundation approved a $230,000 grant to the SCLF.

Letter from David Joel to MLK

Friday, January 12, 1968

In this letter, Joel writes Dr. King requesting assistance with a term paper on "Black Power". Joel is a sophomore at Briarcliff High School and is writing a term paper for his World History course. He hopes that King can offer a more clear explanation of the "Negro situation" and he also includes specific questions for King to answer.

SCLC Voter Registration Report

After having a successful election year as a result of voter registration in Georgia and Tennessee in 1962, the SCLC decided to approach the whole South in attempting to get African Americans to vote. This report gives an overview of the voting situation at that time across the southern states. Other organizations, such as SNCC and the Southwide Voter Education Project, are also referenced as key organizations who helped influenced voter registration.

Royalty Statement for Where Do We Go From Here

Friday, August 4, 1967

Dr. King is receiving a check in the amount of $1048.50 in advance for the German Language edition of Where Do We Go From Here.

Immortality

Dr. King references the book of Psalms regarding the subject of immortality.

Telegram from the SCLC to Rev. John Golden

Tuesday, August 17, 1965

Staff from the SCLC and Citizenship Education Program telegram Reverend John Golden informing him that all expenses will be paid for the trip to Georgia.

Letter from Henry Lee Gibson to MLK

Henry J. Gibson is aware of Dr. King's understanding of "God" and spirituality. Subsequent to a recent surgery, Mr. Gibson is now conscious of the meaning of being "born again." Praying enhanced his knowledge of God's presence in the human race which brought clarity for his perception of the "yellow man." Mr. Gibson requests to meet with Dr. King to further discuss his recent spiritual experiences and newly found wisdom.

This is SCLC

This SCLC brochure highlights the organization's mission, organizational structure, and initiatives, such as voter registration drives, Citizenship Schools, and the Leadership Training Program.

Estimated Budget

This document drafts out SCLC's estimated budget for the 1964-1965 fiscal year.

Letter from David A. Gill

Tuesday, September 5, 1967

Mr. Gill requests a photograph of Dr. King for classroom display.

God

This scripture, deriving from the Old Testament biblical book of Isaiah, illustrates God as holy.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Eartha Kitt

Wednesday, January 24, 1968

Dr. King's secretary Dora McDonald commends actress Eartha Kitt for speaking "as a woman, among women.” Responding to a question by the First Lady at a White House luncheon hosted by Lady Bird Johnson, Kitt linked youth violence to the Vietnam War.

Three Dimensions of a Complete Life

This sermon is one draft of Dr. King's "Three Dimensions of a Complete Life." It was first delivered by Dr. King to the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama.
Another version is entitled, "The Dimensions of a Complete Life." The first dimension is concerned with the well-being of the self. The second dimension is concerned with the well-being of others. The last dimension is concerned with reaching towards God.
As Dr. King implies, if all of these dimensions are equal, then a complete life will be obtained.

Letter from Robert J. McCracken to MLK

Tuesday, February 4, 1964

Rev. McCracken, of Riverside Church in New York, informs Dr. King that he is scheduled to speak at two identical church services. The Church has added the second service because the New York World?s Fair will be open.