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Thoughts on Nobel Prize

Dr. King uses a statement by Mahalia Jackson and the philanthropy of Sir Alfred Nobel to encapsulate the purpose of the Civil Rights Movement. Jackson refers to the racial problems in America as "family business," but Dr. King believes that in order for man to become a brotherhood, society has to search for truth like Alfred Nobel.

The American Dream Outline

Dr. King outlines his "American Dream" speech on the back of letterhead from the Bellevue Stafford hotel. Dr. King writes about a "massive action program" to address injustice in America.

Anticommunist Flyer

This flyer suggests that the U.N. consists of communists Jews. Several contacts are provided for Americans to receive support and be educated about Communism.

Letter from Charles R. Bell Jr. to MLK

Wednesday, November 23, 1966

Mr. Bell inquires about a prisoner who was beaten to death in his home state of Alabama.

Letter from a Soldier to MLK

In one of a series of letters to Dr. King, "Private Friend" seeks further advice from Dr. King on how to combat the discrimination he faces in the Army. Friend's response to Dr. King from an earlier correspondence provides detailed information regarding the sentencing structure of the unfair charges against him.

Letter from Governor Nelson Rockefeller to MLK

Wednesday, August 15, 1962

Governor Nelson Rockefeller encloses a contribution of $5,000 to the SCLC and discusses the forthcoming voter registration drive in which the SCLC will conduct.

Letter from Charles Szolyvai to MLK

Sunday, June 14, 1964

Charles Szolyvai writes Dr. King requesting a meeting in an "effort to help you in your great fight for justice for all." Dr. King handwrites a response at the corner of the document stating his uncertainty of when he will be in New York.

Tampa Tribune: MLK – A Religious Prophet

Saturday, November 7, 1964

In a letter to the editor, Rev. Gordon Christensen responds to The Tribune’s editorial “Peace Prize Puzzle,” saying the problem can be solved from both the secular and religious perspectives. King’s nonviolent resistance to segregation supports national law as laid out in the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Supreme Court decisions. The effort to gain freedom for Negroes through nonviolence offers the world an alternative to Communism as a means of ending colonialism.

Letter from Archon Bowen to MLK

Monday, February 26, 1968

Mr. Bowen, Chairman of the Nominating Committee for Sigma Pi Phi Kappa Boule, expresses concern to Dr. King regarding a decrease in membership due to a high mortality rate of members throughout the nation. Enclosed is a membership nomination form to be completed and returned to the Chairman.

Letter from John Vannorsdall to Dora McDonald

Monday, September 25, 1967

Gettysburg College Chaplain, Mr. Vannorsdall, writes Ms. McDonald concerning the grounds of Dr. King's travel arrangements to speak at the college. He reassures Ms. McDonald of Dr. King's minimal travel time and further discloses his accommodations.

"Where Do We Go From Here?" Asks Negro King

Thursday, February 1, 1968

In this article, Palmer Van Gundy reviews Dr. King's most recent book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?." He calls the book a must for all Americans, naming Dr. King not just the greatest civil rights leaders, but also a "leader for peace with freedom and justice."

Statement by the Leadership Conference Executive Committee on the Kerner Commission Report

Tuesday, April 2, 1968

This statement put forth by the Leadership Conference Executive Committee addresses the results of the Kerner Commission Report, in which the author stresses that without creating viable and integrated communities in our cities "we shall have no cities".

Royalty Statement for a Payot Published Edition of "Why We Can't Wait"

Wednesday, January 31, 1968

This royalty statement for a French-language edition of "Why We Can't Wait" documents royalties earned in 1966.

Statement on The Negro's Political and Economic Power

Friday, October 14, 1966

Dr. King discusses the inferior political and economic power of the American Negro against the backdrop of emerging Black Power organizations. He reveals several new non-violent programs the SCLC targeted at economic and social justice: youth training and political reformation in the South. It is in accordance with the philosophy of non-violence that Dr. King believes the vast majority of Negroes will birth a "community in which neither power nor dignity will be black or white."

Letter from John A. Bodkin to MLK

Friday, April 7, 1967

John Bodkin writes Dr. King regarding the speech Dr. King delivered at Riverside Baptist Church in New York detailing his views on the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, November 3, 1964

Joan Daves writes to Dora McDonald regarding copies of books that she requested Dr. King to autograph for the libraries of Mr. Enoch and Mr. Weybright. She asks Dora about their whereabouts and adds a request for Dr. King to autograph a copy for herself.

Telegram from King Children to Master Billy Watchel

Thursday, January 2, 1969

The King children thank Billy Wachtel for the Christmas gifts he sent to them.

Royalty Summary from J. Campe to MLK

Tuesday, October 25, 1966

This cable from J. Campe to Dr. King details royalty checks disbursed from the sale of "Why We Can't Wait" and "Strength to Love."

Faith

Dr. King quotes William James' "The Sentiment of Rationality" on faith.

A Historian Looks at Our Political Morality

Saturday, July 10, 1965

Liberal historian Henry Steele Commager writes on the political morality of the United States. He asserts that the United States is not above the historical tendency to become corrupt, and the issue will become more important as the United States grows more powerful. He argues that the United States must reconcile the "principles of law and of morality."

MLK on the New York Riots

Monday, July 27, 1964

Dr. King discusses the recent riots that occurred in New York. While some people would like to place the blame on violent blacks, King asserts that one should examine the real issues behind the violence and riots. King states that many blacks feel they will never gain equality in housing, employment, or education, which is why they react violently.

Letter from Pierre C. Armand to MLK

Monday, April 1, 1968

Mr. Armand writes Dr. King concerning the goals of The Haitian Community Center in New York City. The Center attempts to institute programming in order to alleviate the various difficulties of the Haitian community. Mr. Armand also invites Dr. King to speak at a distinguished event as an honorary guest.

Letter from Dinkar Sakrikar to MLK

Friday, September 23, 1966

D.Sakrikar writes to solidify the plans for the donation of a bronze statue of Mahatma Gandhi.

Letter from Cornelius E. Gallagher to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965

Cornelius E. Gallagher writes Dr. King concerning the signing of the discharge petition concerning home rule for the District of Columbia.

Points for Progress, Birmingham, Alabama

This is a list or outline of points for progress in the Birmingham Campaign. They may have been used in a face-to-face presentation with local community leaders or with media officials. These words carefully enumerate the demands or wishes of the civil rights leaders and the Negro community.

SCEF Policy Statement

This is a policy statement on current civil rights and civil liberties issues presented by the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. The organization is an educational agency with the purpose of eradicating discrimination among the nation's citizens. This document contains a list of advocacies and condemnations as it relates to federal legislature in favor of civil rights support.

Letter from Darnell Garner to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Darnell Garner offers condolences to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death, and he invites her to a mass at his church

Dairy Agrees to Double Number of Negro Workers

Wednesday, June 22, 1966

Operation Breadbasket shares an article on the organization's letterhead, which appeared in the Chicago Sun-times. The article highlights the end of a boycott after Mellody Dairy announces a decision to more than double its Negro employees.

Anxiety

Dr. King distinguishes anxiety from fear, noting that fear is directed toward things, while anxiety is directed toward nothingness.

Letter from H. L. Wynter to Dora McDonald

Monday, May 17, 1965

H. L. Wynter writes to Ms. McDonald stating new developments regarding Dr. King's visit to Jamaica in hopes that Dr. King and Mrs. King can adjust.