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SCLC Citizenship Workbook

This workbook is an extension of the SCLC Conference Citizenship program "designed to acquaint citizens with the way in which our government is run and to help them meet voting requirements." This resource tool features a number of vocabulary-building, arithmetic, reading comprehension, and spelling exercises to better equip voters with the knowledge to "fight against prejudice and loss of human rights in education."

The Commercial Appeal: But No Services

Sunday, January 7, 1968

This photo and accompanying caption relate the story of Dr. King and an associate clerical organization conducting a silent vigil at Arlington National Cemetery after being blocked judicially from holding a memorial service in that venue.

Telegram from Bayard Rustin to MLK

Wednesday, October 19, 1966

Bayard Rustin invites Dr. King to join other civil rights leaders for a meeting that will be held in New York, NY.

Mrs.Herr of the Yakima Chapter to MLK

Friday, April 2, 1965

Mrs. Herr, on behalf of the Yakima Chapter of United Nations Association invites Dr. King to speak October 24, in honor of United Nations Week. The organization offers to pay his fee for speaking to their organization.

Letter from James Degener to MLK

Wednesday, February 23, 1966

Lutheran Church youth advisor James Degener asks that Dr. King assist him in showing a group of teenagers life around the dilapidated side of Chicago. Degener's goal is to expose the young people to the crippling and tragic conditions of the inner city. At the time of this correspondence, Dr. King and SCLC were in the midst of an open housing campaign in Chicago, known as the Chicago Freedom Movement.

Letter from the National Committee To Combat Nazism to MLK

Tuesday, June 6, 1967

Rabbi S. Burr Yampol, Chairman of the National Committee to Combat Nazism, sends Dr. King a resolution on civil rights that was passed at their fourth annual conference in Chicago. The resolution formally announces the organization's support of the Civil Rights Movement.

Anonymous letter to MLK

Sunday, June 26, 1966

An anonymous individual expresses their concern with the methods and efforts Dr. King is using to achieve his goals through the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Fred Warren to MLK

Tuesday, January 30, 1968

Fred Warren, Professor of Music at the University of California at Berkeley writes to Dr. King saddened that he will not be able to come to the University. Professor Warren encloses a brochure describing the department's program on Africa, music, and its related arts.

The Cold War: The Insanity of Deterrence

This brochure depicts a child asking "mommy, what's an H bomb?" and serves as anti-nuclear war propaganda.

Financial Statement for Dexter Avenue Baptist Church

Friday, April 8, 1955

The Financial Committee at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church details the budget and contributions for October 1955 through March 1956.

Letter from Larry N. Boyd to MLK

Thursday, March 18, 1965

Larry N. Boyd, President of The United Piedmont Society, writes Dr. King expressing support for the SCLC's fight to achieve human rights for the Negroes throughout the South.

Letter from Robert E. Johnson to Mrs. Agnes Stewart

Saturday, December 17, 1966

This document is a letter from Robert E. Johnson to Mrs. Agnes S. Stewart pertaining to Mr. Johnson's objection to participating in the Armed Forces physical examination due to his belief that "there is a better way to solve conflicting problems that beset men".

Letter from June Alder to MLK

Monday, August 8, 1966

Mrs. Alder expresses her support and concern regarding integrated housing.

Pledge of Support from Thelma Rutherford

Wednesday, March 15, 1967

Thelma Rutherford, Missions Representative for the Church of the Savior in Washington D. C., pledges the churches support for Dr. King and the work of the SCLC. She encloses a check for $500.00 with this letter.

MLK's Statement Regarding Civil Rights Activists' Murders

Friday, December 11, 1964

This statement by Dr. King was written regarding the lynching and murders of three civil rights activists: James Cheyney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner. When Mississippi officials refused to pursue the prosecution of those involved, national outrage prompted the ensuing major federal intervention.

Letter from Henry S. Huntington to MLK

Friday, January 19, 1968

Huntington writes to Dr. King concerning the separation of a mother and child in hospitals after birth. Huntington states, "If we get back to nature's ways in our hospitals instead of starting each new human life in America by rejecting it, as it were, I suspect the increase of juvenile delinquency would melt away."

Telegram from MLK and Wyatt T. Walker to Samual Weston

Monday, April 30, 1962

Wyatt T. Walker and Dr. King sent this telegram to Samual Weston informing him that they were requesting an investigation of his complaint.

SCLC News Release

Saturday, February 26, 1966

This 1966 SCLC news release relays news of the successful "Crawfordville Enterprises" business venture, one which has brought hope to the rural Negroes of Taliaferro County as a combined initiative of the SCLC and cooperating sister organizations.

Resource Teachers

This document lists the eight duties of Resource Teachers, and includes targeted instruction for how this group should interact with base teachers and students.

Telegram from Yamanaka TV to Pete Seeger

Monday, December 4, 1967

A Japanese television host writes American folk singer and activist Pete Seeger requesting that he encourage Dr. King to accept an invitation to appear on the show.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. C.A. Echols

Wednesday, July 14, 1965

Dora McDonald responds to Rev. C.A. Echols on behalf of Dr. King. She encloses a statement from Dr. King which was pubished in the "Massachusetts Review" for Echol's graduate studies.

Letter to Ralph D. Abernathy from Ralph E. Gulliver

Tuesday, November 26, 1963

The James H. Farrell Lodge contributes to the SCLC for the cause of Freedom-Now.

The Southern Patriot: Today's Hero The Negro Child

This column highlights the brave children who endured the hardships of hostile mobs as they blazed the trail for school integration.

Letter from George G. Hill to MLK

Wednesday, April 14, 1965

George Hill expresses that he will continue to support the SCLC but feels the need to make two suggestions regarding the Alabama boycott and Vietnam War. He questions the use of economic force in obtaing equal rights and suggests the need to connect with underprivileged around the world.

Wall Street Journal: Letter to Editor from J. Chico Ramos

Monday, July 22, 1963

Mexican- American J. Chico Ramos gives his opinion to the Editor of The Wall Street Journal on racial issues in America. He objects to the claims that the Civil Rights Movement is going to help all minorities, because while they may benefit negroes, he doesn't feel they have ever benefitted anyone of his own nationality.

Schleiermacher's Meaning of Religion

Dr. King cites a quotation from Friedrich Schleiermacher's perception of the meaning of religion. Schleiermacher asserts that the soul is dissolved in the immediate feeling of the infinite and eternal. Dr. King notes that in order for one to understand the externals of religion, we must first have the inner experience.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Carey B. Preston

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

Dora McDonald sends a reply to the Mrs. Carey B. Preston accepting an invitation on behalf of Dr. King.

Religion

Dr. King's focuses on religious beliefs and their relation to intellectual concepts.

Telegram from Andrew Allen to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

Pastor Andrew J. Allen offers to serve Dr. King's jail term for him.

Letter from John H. Britton, Jr. to MLK about a Photograph

Monday, December 21, 1964

In this letter John H. Britton, Jr., managing editor of JET, encloses a copy of a photograph of Dr. King reading a novel, "The Prize," in a hospital bed. The photograph was sent to Dr. King after the author of the novel, Irving Wallace, also requested a copy.