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"Washington, D.C"

Wipe Out Police Brutality

Wednesday, January 1, 1964
Tennessee (TN), Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C.

This news bulletin created by the Nashville chapter of NAACP and the Davidson County Tennessee Independent Political Council implores African Americans to take action against police brutality and racial discrimination. To illustrate the point, the bulletin contains several pictures capturing police actions against student demonstrators. The article encourages the community's 30,000 unregistered Negro voters to "join the fight for freedom" by registering to vote, writing their Congressmen, and making their voices heard.

People to People: Going To Chicago

Saturday, January 15, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Tennessee (TN), Indiana (IN), Louisville, KY, Kentucky (KY), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

This article appeared in Dr. King's weekly People to People column in the New York Amsterdam News. In it, he discusses the efforts of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and the Coordinating Council of Community Organizations in the Chicago Movement.

Breadbasket Food Chain Sign Contract

Saturday, November 19, 1966
Chicago, IL

These articles highlight a contract that was signed by High Low Foods Inc. and Operation Breadbasket to increase the number of jobs for Negroes.

CIC Press Release: Hilliard to Head Catholic Testimonial for MLK

Wednesday, September 23, 1964
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

The Catholic Interracial Council releases a statement announcing Raymond M. Hilliard as the Chairman of the 1964 John F. Kennedy Award Dinner. During the event, Dr. King will be honored for his leadership and dedication to the civil rights struggle. Hilliard, whom President Johnson named to the National Citizens Committee for Community Relations to advise on the implementation of civil rights legislation, called Dr. King's work "inspired and truly Christian" and said that the CIC was honored to celebrate him.

Card from Joyce Anderson to MLK

Saturday, September 27, 1958
New York (NY)

Joyce Anderson sends Dr. King a "get well" card with a note of encouragement after he was stabbed by a woman in Harlem, New York.

People in Action: Recognition and Opportunity

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King states there are two basic elements to human rights: recognition and opportunity.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Kjelle Eide

Monday, January 29, 1968
Oslo, Norway

In this letter Dr. King is expressing regret to Kjell Eide for the continued difficulty in organizing the peace mission. He currently aims to focus on the organizational plans for domestic issues, but would still consider a proposed alternative.

Letter from Frederic M. Hudson to MLK Regarding an Invitation

Tuesday, July 11, 1967
Maine (ME), New York (NY)

In this letter, Mr. Hudson, a Chaplain at Colby College, extends Dr. King an invitation to speak at the college. Mr. Hudson also offers some of the students to be possible volunteers for Dr. King.

Letter from Roosevelt Zanders to MLK

Sunday, June 3, 1962
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), Washington, D.C.

Roosevelt Zanders expresses his appreciation to Dr. King after receiving a kind letter and personal autographed copy of "Stride Toward Freedom." Zanders expresses his appreciation for the luncheon in Washington, D. C. and states his desire to visit the Reverend again.

God

Dr. King cites the Old Testament book of Exodus in reference to "the idea of a primitive anthropomorphic God."

Hegel's Social Ethics

Dr. King writes notes on Hegel's social ethics. He quotes, "The principle triad here consist of law in the sense of abstract right, morality, and social ethics." According to Hegel, abstract right may be defined as being a person and respecting other people, while morality refers to one's conscience and social ethics regards another triad, being family, civil society, and the state.

Telegram from the Nashville Student Movement to MLK

Wednesday, October 19, 1960
Nashville, TN

The Nashville Nonviolent Student Movement writes to Dr. King in jail commending him for his courageous act, while urging him to remain in jail for the cause.

Letter from MLK to Jonathan B. Bingham

Monday, February 28, 1966
Washington, D.C., New York (NY), VIETNAM

Dr. King responds to Congressman Bingham's request for information concerning SCLC's position on foreign policy matters and donor contributions. Dr. King informs the congressman that the organization decided at a recent convention to "have SCLC abstain from foreign policy matters," in order to preserve its civil rights objectives and donor's trust. However, Dr. King states that SCLC permits individual employees to assume whatever position they choose regarding foreign policy matters, and contributes his public statements concerning Vietnam to this privilege.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Bent Ostergaard

Wednesday, October 20, 1965
DENMARK, NETHERLANDS, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Miss McDonald informs Mr. Ostergaard that Dr. King is unable to accept his recent invitation to visit Copenhagen.

Letter from MLK to Daniel Goodwin

Monday, August 12, 1963
New York (NY), Washington, D.C.

Dora McDonald conveys Dr. King's request for Mr. Daniel Goodwin to participate in the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedoms.

Social Gospel

Dr. King describes the period of the social gospel.

Letter from MLK to James M. Kangongoi

Monday, April 16, 1962
PUERTO RICO, KENYA

Dr. King writes Mr. James M. Kangongoi acknowledging the receipt of his letter and expressing how good it was to meet him in Puerto Rico.

God is a Spirit

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "God Is A Spirit" and lists three different meanings for that assertion.

Telegram from the Church of Sweden to MLK

Tuesday, March 3, 1964
Stockholm, Sweden

The Church of Sweden invites Dr. King to take part in a great church event in the fall of 1964. The church assures Dr. King that all expenses will be paid for his travel and the archbishop of Sweden will provide him with the official invitation letter.

Letter from John Thomas Porter to MLK

Thursday, June 28, 1962
Atlanta, GA, Denver, CO, Michigan (MI), Birmingham, AL

Mr. Porter, pastor of First Baptist Institutional Church, writes to Dr. King concerning a previously discussed letter of recommendation. The letter will address a vacant pastoral position in Birmingham, Alabama.

Telegram from MLK regarding OEO

Monday, October 30, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King sent this telegram to several members of the House of Representatives urging them to approve a vote on the Office of Economic Opportunity and the War on Poverty.

Letter from Leland Stewart to MLK

Thursday, May 11, 1967
Chicago, IL, VIETNAM, Los Angeles, CA, California (CA)

Leland Stewart, of the Conference on Science and Religion, writes to Dr. King to offer support in the movement to end the war in Vietnam.

Letter from MLK to John Conyers

Friday, February 19, 1965
Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Selma, AL

Dr. King expresses his gratitude for Congressman John Conyers' visit to Selma, Alabama. Dr. King requests Congressman Conyers' support for passing federal legislation that will eliminate the barriers to a free voting process for African American citizens.

Letter from Representative Ken W. Dyal to MLK

Monday, August 30, 1965
Washington, D.C.

California Congressman Ken Dyal writes Dr. King to inform him that he has signed the discharge petition for the Home Rule Bill.

Letter from Mildred Hood to MLK

Saturday, May 7, 1966
Chicago, IL

Mildred Hood explains to Dr. King what she and her daughter experienced at the Cook County Hospital in Chicago. Hood wants to know what she can do about the situation.

Mixed Marriage

Arizona (AZ), VIETNAM

This illustration, created by Reg Manning, depicts Dr. King presiding over an interracial marriage between the Civil Rights Movement and "Veatnik War Protests." This drawing was published in the "Arizona Republic."

Letter from John A. Bodkin to MLK

Friday, April 7, 1967
New York, NY

John Bodkin writes Dr. King regarding the speech Dr. King delivered at Riverside Baptist Church in New York detailing his views on the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. H. Libby

Friday, September 8, 1961
New York (NY)

Dora McDonald sends Mrs. Libby a copy of Dr. King's sermon "Paul's Letter to American Christians." McDonald could not retrieve a copy of the address preached at the Riverside Church that Mrs. Libby requested.

Letter From Octavia Wynbush Strong to MLK

Saturday, February 13, 1965
Missouri (MO)

Mrs. Strong offers Dr. King a copy of her play "Listen, America," with hopes that he might use it in his "wonderful work."

The Role of the Church

New York (NY), New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, INDIA, INDONESIA, GHANA, BRAZIL

Dr. King expresses how ineffective the Emancipation Proclamation has truly been on the Civil Rights Movement.