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"Washington (WA)"

Letter from Lula Belle Williams to Dr. and Mrs. King

Tuesday, November 28, 1967
Birmingham, AL

Lula Williams writes Dr. and Mrs. King seeking help to pay her rent before she is evicted.

Wall Street Journal: Letter to Editor from J. Chico Ramos

Monday, July 22, 1963
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Mexican- American J. Chico Ramos gives his opinion to the Editor of The Wall Street Journal on racial issues in America. He objects to the claims that the Civil Rights Movement is going to help all minorities, because while they may benefit negroes, he doesn't feel they have ever benefitted anyone of his own nationality.

Telegram from Mrs. Dorothy Johnson to MLK

Thursday, November 2, 1967
Chicago, IL, Birmingham, AL

Mrs. Dorothy Johnson writes Dr. King to express her support of his endeavors while he is in jail in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Pauline Lee to MLK

Monday, January 9, 1967
California (CA)

Pauline Lee withdraws her support from Dr. King due to his failure to withdraw support for Adam Clayton Powell.

Article Concerning Race Relation in Mississippi

Monday, March 23, 1964
Mississippi (MS)

In this article the author, Scott B. Smith, highlights two Civil Rights Workers who were recently released from prison in Madison county, Mississippi. Mr. Smith discusses the role of race in legal procedures and the community.

Telegram from Dr. F. Earl McLendon to MLK

Tuesday, March 9, 1965
Selma, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. McLendon, President of the Atlanta Medical Association, offers aid to Dr. King and the people of Selma, Alabama after incidents of police brutality.

Telegram from Mary Gregory to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967
Washington, D.C.

In this telegram, Mary Gregory, President of the Frederick Douglass Association, informed Dr. King of their rededicated efforts to the movement, during his incarceration in the Birmingham Jail.

Events

Dr. King quotes Lawrence's dissertation on the meaning of events in nature.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Sodd

Dr. King writes to Mrs. Sodd regarding her concerns for fair and just treatment.

Letter from Robert T. Handy to MLK

Wednesday, July 1, 1964
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Robert Handy of the Union Theological Seminary invites Dr. King to be the "major evening speaker" for their Conference on Race and Religion.

Letter from Arthur L. Kinsolving to MLK

Tuesday, September 19, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

Arthur Kingsolving sends his thanks to Dr. King for remembering him and sending a copy of "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Letter from Marry Gottesfeld to MLK

Wednesday, August 7, 1963
New York, NY

Mary Gottesfeld, president of the Community and Social Agency Employees Union, writes Dr. King expressing pleasure in contributing more to Dr. King's organization. She also reminds him of the thousands that are behind his cause.

Letter from Howard W. Rogerson to MLK

Wednesday, February 17, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Howard W. Rogerson of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights writes Dr. King seeking his opinion and advice regarding a "technical publication for disseminating information on current activities and publications in the field of civil rights."

Letter from MLK to Helga Gulbrandsen

Thursday, March 12, 1964
Oslo, Norway, NORWAY

Dr. King responds to an invitation to visit Oslo, Norway under the auspices of the Norwegian Fellowship in the fall of 1964. He informs Ms. Gulbrandsen that he cannot commit to accepting the invitation due to his uncertain schedule, but assures her that he will keep her invitation on file. However, Dr. King's handwritten notes found on the letter indicate that he was unable to accept the invitation.

Publicity Plans for Pilgrimage Tour

New York (NY)

This document describes a request for Dr. King to become involved with the Pilgrimage Tour in New York.

Letter from Fred S. Bertsch Jr. to MLK

Thursday, April 22, 1965
Michigan (MI), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

Fred Bertsch Jr., Principal of the Holland School in Michigan, informs Dr. King that the school has made other arrangements for its commencement ceremony.

Letter from Rev. J. Edward Lantz to MLK

Wednesday, November 4, 1964
Atlanta, GA

Rev. Lantz, Executive Director of the Southern Office of the National Council of the Churches of Christ, congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Telegram to Dr. King about Vietnam

Monday, April 10, 1967
California (CA), Georgia (GA)

The Magee Volunteers for International Developement have communicated with Dr. King regarding the international projects within Vietnam.

Servetus, Michael

SPAIN, Geneva, Switzerland

Dr. King writes biographical notes about Michael Servetus, a citizen of Spain known for his study of medicine and theology. Servetus was burned at the stake because of his anti-Trinitarian views.

Photo of MLK

An unidentified photo of Dr. King from the Morehouse Collection.

Letter from Edmond G. Jeffries to MLK

Sunday, January 27, 1963
Illinois (IL), Alabama (AL)

Edmond G. Jeffries writes Dr. King after hearing him speak at the Chicago Sunday Evening Club. Jeffries states, "The injustices that the white man has visited on the colored man for hundreds of years burns my soul." Jeffries expresses that he only wants to be a Christian.

Letter from Clarence E. Duffy to MLK

Tuesday, May 16, 1967
New Mexico (NM), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Rev. Duffy expresses his religious and political concerns with Dr. King as he considers a potential presidential campaign in 1968.

Telegram from NY Chapter of Americans for Democratic Action to MLK

Monday, September 22, 1958
New York (NY), New York, NY

The NY Chapter of Americans for Democratic Action sends Dr. King well wishes and hopes for a speedy recovery.

Letter from P. Edward Haley to MLK

Tuesday, August 8, 1967
Washington, D.C.

P. Haley writes to express appreciation for Dr. King's works. Haley encloses copy of letter he and his wife sent to their Congressmen commending Dr. King's ideas concerning Vietnam and the riots. The Haleys are making an effort to start a nationwide campaign by encouraging their friends to write their congressman as well.

MLK Note

New York (NY)

Dr. King writes a story about a father and son waiting for a train at New York's Grand Central Station. The son is headed to college in New England and the father gives the young man some simple, yet profound advice. "Bill, never forget who you are."

Anonymous Telegram to President Johnson

Tuesday, October 31, 1967
Washington, D.C., Missouri (MO)

This telegram, intended for the White House, was sent regarding the treatment of a former African American Secret Service agent, Abraham Bolden, at the federal medical center in Springfield, Missouri. The sender states that President Johnson ought to follow the United States Constitution and restore Mr. Bolden's freedom or face consequences.

Letter from Adrienne Lombardi to MLK

Thursday, February 8, 1968

Adrienne Lombardi writes Dr. King to express her gratitude that he believes everyone owes their first allegiance to God. She also discusses her view on religion and her sentiments regarding the war.

Letter from Cryssana Jenkins Bogner to MLK

Monday, June 19, 1967
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Brooklyn, NY

Mrs. Cryssana Jenkins Bogner writes Dr. King with to both support his leadership in the Civil Rights Movement, and to share her discontent with Executive Director of the NAACP Roy Wilkin's stance on the Vietnam War.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Edwin Fenton

Monday, July 10, 1967
Pittsburgh, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Ms. McDonald is responding to the letter requesting permission of the use of Dr. King's speeches. The permission was granted to the Carnegie Institute of Technology. If any other services were needed then SCLC would be at their disposal.

Letter from Carole A. Burnett to MLK

Sunday, June 18, 1967
California (CA), VIETNAM, Berkeley, CA

Mrs. Burnett informs Dr. King that her and her husband's financial support of the SCLC is suspended due to Dr. King's support of the Spring Mobilization and Vietnam Summer program. Though the Burnetts support the peace movement, they feel these two groups "present Hanoi's view of the Vietnam war."