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"Washington (WA)"

Letter from Clair Callan to MLK

Thursday, January 7, 1965

Representative Callan of Nebraska writes Dr. King to thank him for his recent telegram regarding the Mississippi Congressional Delegation. After giving serious consideration to Dr. King's recommendation to vote against seating the Mississippi Congressman, Callan states that he came to the conclusion that "a refusal to seat the Delegation in question would not further the cause of the Negro in that state," and consequently voted for the seating.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Stokley Carmichael

Tuesday, November 29, 1966

In this letter, Dora McDonald informs Stokley Carmichael about an enclosure of an autographed photograph of Dr. King.

Letter to Eugene Exman from MLK

Monday, December 4, 1961

Dr. King responds to a previous correspondence from Mr. Eugene Exman of Harper and Brothers Publishing. The content of the letter references Dr. King's discussion with Mr. Mel Arnold, regarding his sermons being transcribed into a manuscript. The sermons would eventually be compiled into what would be Dr. King's second book, "Strength to Love."

Address by MLK at 47th NAACP Annual Convention

Wednesday, June 27, 1956

Dr. King addresses the audience at the 47th NAACP annual convention in San Francisco, California. King begins with background information of slavery and its physical and mental effects on Africans, then tells the "Montgomery Story." This story begins with a mental transformation among blacks, which led to the Montgomery boycott. As a result of the boycott, blacks were empowered and began fighting injustice and seeking changes in unfair legislation.

Letter from Gilbert J. Clark Law to MLK

Tuesday, March 9, 1965

The University of Alberta requests Dr. King's presence for a meeting at the University of Alberta Law School. The author expounds on the details surrounding the law school forum.

How Modern Christians Should Think of Man

In the early 1950's, Dr. King writes a paper elaborating on how modern Christians should think about man. He discusses the difficulty of transition by idealizing the perception of man in a mild neo-orthodox or liberal view. Dr. King battles with having an optimistic view of man and the reality of his experiences in the south. He asserts that man is neither good nor bad by nature by has the potential for either. The objectivity of man as a finite child of nature is further expounded upon. He explains that man is rational, free, and a responsible being.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK Regarding Regarding Wiley Branton

Thursday, April 29, 1965

In this letter the office of the Vice President informs Dr. King of the new role of Wiley Branton to serve as Executive Secretary of the President's Council on Equal Opportunity.

Telegram from Al Duckett to MLK

Saturday, July 9, 1966

In this telegram to Dr. King, Mr. Al Duckett professes his willingness to protest in Chicago.

Letter from Herschel Auerbach to MLK

Friday, October 13, 1967

Mr. Auerbach objects to "anti-Semitic and anti-Israel" resolutions adopted at the National Conference of New Politics, at which King was a keynote speaker.

Humanism

Dr. King discusses the relationship between God and humanist thinking.

Letter from David Brandyberry to MLK

Thursday, June 20, 1963

David Brandberry, a student 16 years of age, informs Dr. King that he desires to voice his opinion about the racial issues in the south. Mr. Brandberry cannot comprehend the logical reasoning of racism and the motives of the "ignorant whites." Furthermore, the student discusses the issues of immigration and the political concept of communism. Mr. Brandberry states that he "wish he had been born a Negro" to he could be of more assistance in the movement.

Letter From D. Parke Gibson to MLK

Wednesday, July 24, 1963

D. Parke Gibson informs Dr. King that they will be working with International Correspondence Schools. Gibson also feels that home study education could "lead to upgrading of many Negro workers."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Irvine I. Turner

Tuesday, April 24, 1962

Dora McDonald explains to Irvine Turner that Dr. King is unable to endorse political candidates due to the "non-partisan nature" of the SCLC.

Letter from Ben J. Mack to Reverend Andrew Young

Ben Mack forwards to Reverend Young an invitation for Dr. King to speak at the annual banquet of the South Carolina Congress of Parents and Teachers.

Semi-Arianism

Dr. King records a definition of semi-Arianism.

Spirit of Law[s]

Dr. King summarizes “The Spirit of the Laws,” written by Montesquieu, a political philosopher of the Enlightenment period.

Fiercely Upward and Other Newspaper Articles

This document contains a combination of two poems by a principle in Brooklyn, N.Y., and two articles highlighting significant upcoming events of 1963 and 1964. The first article announces the third printing of Dr. King's book "Strength to Love" as well as information regarding the release of his forthcoming work "Why We Can't Wait." The second article reports on Mrs. Medgar W. Evers' speaking tour slated to take place in the fall of 1963, just a few months after her husband, the NAACP leader, was slain.

Letter from Harley Lappin to MLK

Wednesday, January 3, 1968

The Public Affairs Committee of Winters College at York University in Ontario invites Dr. King to participate in a discussion to raise student awareness of current political issues.

Statement by Congresswoman Leonor K. Sullivan

Tuesday, November 28, 1967

Congresswoman Leonor K. Sullivan issues a statement on the passing of the Consumer Credit Protection Act of 1967.

Schleiermacher (The Religious Man)

Dr. King quotes Schleiermacher's views on man's identification with Religion.

Letter from Pastor R. L. Crady to MLK

Wednesday, February 3, 1965

Pastor Crady expresses concern to Dr. King that the civil rights movement mayl be in vain, because segregationist organizations can use the umbrella of religious protection, along with taxpayer funds, to back up their convictions.

Letter from Isaac Foster Regarding a Scholarship

Tuesday, March 28, 1967

Isaac Foster, a student at Queens College, informs his reader of reasons why he should be awarded a scholarship.

Student Permanent Record of Judith Ann Jones

Tuesday, March 28, 1967

The student permanent record of Judith Ann Jones lists her academic progress while attending Chowchilla Union High School in Fresno, California in 1965.

Secrets of Married Happiness

Dr. King writes notes regarding the way to a successful marriage. King asserts that in order to have a happy marriage, husband and wife must communicate and get to know one another's similarities and differences. It is also important to engage in mutual compromise.

Christianity (History Of)

Dr. King quotes Harkness on the history of Christianity. Likely this is American theologian Georgia Harkness.

Letter from Lawrence G. Holt to MLK Regarding Civil Rights

Saturday, September 30, 1967

In this Letter, Lawrence Holt writes to Dr. King urging him to limit his public comments to those regarding civil rights and not the war in Vietnam. Holt states, "You are in a unique position to help the civil rights movement which you are endangering by your public comments on the war."

Letter from MLK to Vera Jones

Thursday, December 2, 1965

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Vera Jones for her support of the Freedom Movement and the SCLC.

CEP News

Wednesday, September 1, 1965

The Citizenship Education Program of the SCLC, in cooperation with the American Missionary Association issue this periodic publication that includes updates of the organization's progress, current events and other news of interest.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, January 13, 1964

Joan Daves writes Dr. King regarding an incomplete document that he signed for the "English tax people." For his convenience, she encloses a pre-written letter to send to England once the document is officially completed.

MLK's Statement on Current Electoral Politics

This is the draft of a statement that Dr. King planned to make, concerning the state of politics in America. Dr. King expresses his disappointment in that "the quality of some of the men elected makes a mockery of responsible government," and urges African-Americans to "lose faith in a shallow 'good will' that provides nothing."