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His Attitude Toward Higher Criticism

Dr. King quotes German philosopher Immanuel Kant's book "The Preface to the First Edition.

Letter from Mrs. Sammie Adams to MLK

Monday, April 4, 1966
Georgia (GA)

Mrs. Sammie Adams, a 67-year-old widow, writes an emotional appeal to Dr. and Mrs. King in an effort to collect money for Easter clothes for her children. She acknowledges that she previously donated to Dr. King and the cause for civil rights and would benefit from some assistance.

Standing By The Best in an Evil Time" E

Sunday, August 6, 1967
Atlanta, GA

In this sermon, Dr. King addresses the evil in the world and suggest to his congregation that they counter this by being strong and steadfast in the Lord. Dr. King also touches on the current issues in society and how to continue the use of nonviolence as means to for peace and social justice.

Mail and Messages Note to MLK

Tuesday, December 12, 1967
Kansas (KS), Philadelphia, PA, Minnesota (MN), Los Angeles, CA, New York (NY)

This is a list of mail and messages for Dr. King dated 12/12/67. It includes a letter from his literary agent Joan Daves about a speech to be given at the University of Kansas, a publication from the Southern Regional Council, and phone calls about speaking engagements and media inquiries.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Stoug

Dr. King writes Mrs. Stoug thanking her for sending a copy of the play, "Listen America." He also offers advice on how to market her play and expresses his appreciation for her support for the Civil Rights Movement.

Invitation for the Inauguration of Hugh Morris Gloster

Atlanta, GA

This is an invitation for the Inauguration of the seventh president of Morehouse College.

The Kinship Between the Labor Unions and Negroes

Dr. King presents a speech at the United Auto Workers Convention in May 1961, which acknowledges the new challenges faced by factory workers because of technological advances that threaten to leave them jobless. He draws a parallel between the plight of auto workers and the Negro experiences of disenfranchisement in the US to highlight the potential for alliance between the two groups.

Letter from William Stuart Nelson to MLK

Thursday, July 15, 1965
Washington, D.C., INDIA

William Stuart Nelson writes Dr King prompting him to take into consideration a request from Mr. G. L. Mehta as will as to visit Africa. Nelson comments on the importance of the non-violence concept being propagated across India and Africa.

Transcript of MLK Appearance on WINS Radio

Sunday, May 31, 1964
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C.

This document is a 1964 transcript of a WINS Radio interview with Dr. King. The focus is the Civil Rights Bill.

Letter from Brenda Sepulveda to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY

A student from New York writes this letter of condolence to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death.

Letter from Jackie Robinson to MLK

Tuesday, October 9, 1962
New York (NY)

Jackie Robinson writes Dr. King to accept a position of responsibility with the SCLC.

Memorandum from MLK to SCLC

Saturday, February 8, 1958
Atlanta, GA

In this memorandum to the representatives of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Dr. King encloses two resolutions that the Executive Board approved. The resolutions state that a letter should be sent to Senator Thomas C. Hennings and Attorney General William P. Rogers. Dr. King suggests that the resolutions be adopted at all of the SCLC's mass meetings, scheduled for February 12th.

MLK Examination Blue Book

Friday, May 23, 1947

Dr. King used this "Blue Book" to record answers for a Bible exam taken on May 23, 1947.

A. Philip Randolph Institute Minutes

Tuesday, November 7, 1967
New York, NY

These meeting minutes of the Executive Board of the A. Philip Randolph Institute include discussions on the urgent need for legislative action on the Freedom Budget, a possible theoretical and analytical magazine on the Negro struggle for equality, and celebration of Mr. Randolph's 80th birthday.

Holiday Greetings to You and Yours!

Frances Pauley inquires about the "white Santa Claus" and seeks the day when all children are equal.

Letter from MLK to Matthew Schoenwald

Thursday, August 20, 1964
New York, NY

Dr. King thanks Matthew Schoenwald and the members of the Undergarment and Negligee Workers Union for their contribution to SCLC.

Psychology

This series of note cards addresses psychology through the means of human unity. The concept of human unity is indicated by the presence of the body and the soul working in conjunction to inform the human experience. Dr. King references the views of St. Augustine and St. Thomas as it pertains to "the close union between body and soul."

Song of Solomon

Dr. King discusses the biblical book Song of Solomon and asserts that it contains minimal significance and little, if any, religious value.

Memorandum from Opal C. Jones to MLK Regarding

Friday, April 7, 1967
Los Angeles, CA

In this letter, Opal Jones informs Dr. King of an address change for the Neighborhood Adult Participation Project.

"Dr. King Outdated"

Saturday, July 15, 1967
North Carolina (NC), VIETNAM

This editorial reviews Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" Under the heading "Dr. King Outdated." The review expresses Mr. Bob Smith's disagreement with many themes of the book.

Where Do We Go From Here (Chapter V Draft)

Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Georgia (GA), New York (NY), Selma, AL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This draft of Where Are We Going?, Chapter 5 of Dr. King's book Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? was significantly edited before publication but the central ideas are here. The government's failure to develop economic justice programs cannot be blamed on the Civil Rights Movement's lack of ideas, as often claimed. Building the political will for change is more important for the movement. The rights of Negroes to economic well-being are well aligned with goals and tactics of the labor movement. Negro leadership needs to be developed from within the community.

Statement Regarding Fred L. Shuttlesworth's Court Appearances

Tuesday, July 12, 1966
Louisville, KY, Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA

This document explains Rev. Shuttlesworth upcoming court appearances as a result of his civil rights activities. He faces charges for blocking a sidewalk during a demonstration and for protesting at Drake Memorial Hospital.

Telegram from Phil Stovin to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967
Wisconsin (WI)

Mr. Stovin praises Dr. King for his nonviolent approach towards achieving peace.

Letter from R. Lennox to MLK

Wednesday, November 25, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY, CANADA

R. Lennox, a principal at Presbyterian College in Montreal, Canada, invites Dr. King to speak on ministry at the college's 100th anniversary convocation address.

Letter from Harold Swank to Helen Brooks Regarding Financial Assistance

Friday, August 6, 1965
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Harold O. Swank, director of the State of Illinois Department of Public Aid, writes Helen Brooks regarding her request for financial assistance and housing.

Schleiermacher, Friedrich

Dr. King records a note on Friedrich Schleiermacher's "Speeches on Religion."

Letter from Vanessa Garrett to MLK

Friday, February 2, 1968
Chicago, IL

Vanessa Garrett writes Dr. King discussing various problems African Americans face. She seeks advice on how to solve these issues.

Letter from Rev. Oliver W. Holmes to Dora McDonald

Thursday, January 23, 1964
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

Reverend Oliver Holmes confirms the possibility of a meeting between Dr. King and Mrs. Leonard Faber, a graduate student in religion. Her dissertation involves Dr. King, German monk and theologian Martin Luther and Jewish philosopher Martin Buber.

Letter from Herman Will, Jr. to MLK

Thursday, April 27, 1967
Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Herman Will, Associate General Secretary for the Division of Peace and World Order, General Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Methodist Church expresses his appreciation to Dr. King.

Letter from Bea Subt to MLK

Saturday, April 22, 1967
New York, NY, California (CA), VIETNAM, CAMBODIA, PHILIPPINES, AUSTRALIA

The author sends Dr. King a letter informing him that she is withdrawing her assistance toward civil rights workers since he has decided to be a politician, military leader and diplomat. She also questions how he can fight for equal rights in a country that's not worth protecting from the communists.