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"Washington (WA)"

Letter from Rev. Robert E. DuBose, Jr. to MLK

Thursday, June 30, 1966
Philadelphia, PA

The Rev. Robert E. DuBose Jr. offers a prayer to Dr. King, after his march in Jackson, Mississippi. Rev. DuBose was not able to attend the march.

Letter from Kenyan Student to MLK

Monday, March 5, 1962
PUERTO RICO, KENYA

A student writes Dr. King expressing support for his movement and social views in regards to Civil Rights.

Dr.King's letter to Dr. & Mrs.Rousseau

California (CA), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr.King's letter to Dr. & Mrs. Rousseau was about his views on Vietnam. He believed that America's involvement in Vietnam was wrong and that the United States was on the wrong side of peace.

Letter from Miriam Ottenberg to MLK

Friday, October 30, 1964
Washington, D.C., Oslo, Norway

Miriam Ottenberg, President of the Women's National Press Club, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and asks if he would address a luncheon for the Club. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in red ink.

New York Amsterdam News: Our New President

Friday, December 27, 1963
Texas (TX), Alabama (AL)

Dr. King opens his statement on Lyndon B. Johnson, the new president of the United States, and how the tenure of his presidency began with adversity. Due to the elected southern president, the nation questions the possible improvement of the Negro community. Dr. King asserts that President Johnson's record on civil rights is astounding and his "southern-ness" will provide him with a better understanding of the Negro's plight. Dr. King further details the perceptions, actions, and works of President Johnson's efforts in the civil rights movement.

Letter from Polly G. to MLK

Sunday, March 4, 1962
Berkeley, CA, Atlanta, GA

Polly G. writes Dr. King informing him that her class is creating reports on famous people. She has chosen to write her report on Dr. King and asks him to assist her by sending some additional material along with a photograph.

Postcard from Friedrich Derz to MLK

Wednesday, March 6, 1963
Berlin, Germany, Birmingham, AL

Friedrich Derz's brief message of "solidarity" illustrates the unity fostered by the international community in the fight for civil rights.

Letter from the Prime Minister of Jordan to MLK

Monday, January 23, 1967
JORDAN, Atlanta, GA

The Prime Minister of Jordan, Wasfi Tell, invites Dr. King to visit Jordan during his upcoming pilgrimage to the Middle East. Minister Tell assures Dr. King that his pilgrimage will be regarded spiritually, and not politically.

Letter from MLK to Mr. P. H. Waldraff

California (CA), VIETNAM

Dr. King shares his views of the American military presence in Vietnam and America's moral obligation to social justice.

Letter from Johan Mulert to MLK

Wednesday, May 24, 1967
BELGIUM

Mr. Mulert requests for Dr. King to send him an autograph and a photo.

Letter from William Mahoney to MLK

Tuesday, January 30, 1968
Washington, D.C.

William Mahoney asks Dr. King for his input on a SCLC monthly publication in which he is attempting to create. The publication would seek to educate the public on social, economic, and political problems African Americans endure.

Report on Workshop for the Huntsville Movement

Friday, March 9, 1962
Alabama (AL)

This is a report about the civil rights movement in Huntsville, Alabama in the early 1960's. Hank Thomas, a CORE Field Representative, cultivated a group of students from Alabama A & M to conduct sit-ins and non-violent demonstrations at local businesses.

Letter from Erica Smith to MLK

Monday, August 20, 1962

Erica Smith writes Dr. King to express her dismay for the people who are against the Civil Rights Movement. Ms. Smith is in full support of Dr. King's fight for social justice and prays for his continuing journey.

Letter from Dan C. Lortie to MLK

Monday, May 23, 1966
Chicago, IL

Professor Dan Lortie of the University of Chicago invites Dr. King to speak at the Colver-Rosenberger Lecture Series.

Biographical Sketches of Leaders of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

New Jersey (NJ), Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Missouri (MO), Minnesota (MN), North Carolina (NC), Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA, Little Rock, AR, Jackson, MS, Detroit, MI, Montgomery, AL, Maryland (MD), Chicago, IL, Berlin, Germany

These are biographical sketches of various leaders who were involved in the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedoms. These distinguished individuals were involved in organizations that focused on equality and nonviolence.

Letter from Robert N. Balkind to Andrew Young

New York, NY

This document is a letter of condolence written by the chief executive of a manufacturing company and addressed to Andrew Young, mistakenly listed as head of the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People). The writer laments Dr. King's assassination and offers a contribution in his "name, honor, and memory."

Teacher Exchange

Thursday, December 17, 1964
Connecticut (CT), New York (NY)

The Darien Board of Education exchange program is under scrutiny, given claims that African American teachers integrating into the majority Caucasian Connecticut school district will be unqualified to teach.

Letter from Joan Daves to Mrs. Dora McDonald about expenses from trip to New York

Tuesday, June 9, 1964
New York, NY

Dr. and Mrs. King extended their stay in New York City to launch his latest book. Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, wrote to Dora McDonald requesting lodging receipts in an effort to expedite the expense reporting process with Harper Publishing. Handwritten notes on the document suggest that the launch was very successful.

Letter from Lily E. Sternlow to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968
SOUTH AFRICA, Atlanta, GA

With topics ranging from "The Poor Pay More for Less" to the featured article "Malawi's Anti-Christian Atrocities - A Shame on Africa," this edition of "Awake" magazine is forwarded by Lily Sternlow to Dr. King. After receiving word of Dr. King's travels to Africa, Sternlow brings attention to issues surrounding Christian witnesses in Malawi.

Letter from Charles Sherrod to Friends of SNCC

Saturday, July 22, 1961
Atlanta, GA, Tennessee (TN)

Field Secretary Charles Sherrod invites friends of the SNCC to an emergency meeting to outline the direction of the student and Civil Rights Movement. The meeting is to be held at the Highlander Folk School in Tennessee which serves as a training ground for nonviolence and civil rights activities.

Third Level (Cont.)

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich’s “Systematic Theology.” He used this quote in his doctoral dissertation, “A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman.”

Central Methodist Church Program

Sunday, August 18, 1957
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King speaks at the Central Methodist Church after a Sunday service regarding the work that he has done for the community.

Angels

Dr. King writes on angels, according to Daniel 10:13, 21, and 12:1.

Letter from Mary Meeks to MLK

Saturday, August 14, 1965
Chicago, IL

Mrs. Meeks praises Dr. King for his nonviolent approach. She describes Dr. King as a "man of God" and believes that he is also a servant of God.

The Significant Contributions of Jeremiah to Religious Thought

Pennsylvania (PA)

These handwritten notes appear to be a draft of the essay "The Significant Contributions of Jeremiah to Religious Thought." Dr. King wrote this for James Bennett Pritchard's class on the Old Testament at Crozer Theological Seminary. Circa September 14, 1948 - November 24, 1948. The actual essay is in the King Archive at Boston University's Howard Gotlieb Archival Research Center.

MLK's Perception of God and Repenting

Dr. King quotes a scripture from the Bible elaborating on God's inability to repent or do evil.

Draft: The Time for Freedom Has Come

Tuesday, May 1, 1962
GHANA, NIGERIA, KENYA, CONGO / ZAIRE, MALAWI

In this draft of Dr. King's article, "The Time for Freedom Has Come," he discusses the role of African American students in the Civil Rights Movement. He praises the commitment and determination of students and credits them with the desegregation of lunch counters. He also identifies with the students' frustration with the slowness of forward progress in the struggle for equality. The article was published in New York Times Magazine on September 10, 1961.

Article Written by the Spring Mobilization Committee To End the War in Vietnam

New York, NY, FRANCE, CONGO / ZAIRE, AUSTRALIA, VIETNAM, UNITED KINGDOM, New Delhi, India, Berlin, Germany

The following article written by the Spring Mobilization Committee illustrates the growing international support for ending the Vietnam War. It specifically highlights the Union of Vietnamese Students in France, an organization seeking to cooperate with American students in order to promote peace in Vietnam.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. H. Libby

Friday, September 8, 1961
New York (NY)

Dora McDonald sends Mrs. Libby a copy of Dr. King's sermon "Paul's Letter to American Christians." McDonald could not retrieve a copy of the address preached at the Riverside Church that Mrs. Libby requested.

Letter from Rev. Jesse Jackson to MLK

Thursday, February 23, 1967
Chicago, IL

In an effort to make Operation Breadbasket successful ,the SCLC held seminars to help the negro businessmen develop their businesses. Jackson invites Dr. King and anyone else he wants to bring as an informal resource during the seminar.