The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:

Invoice for The 1961 American Peoples Encyclopedia Yearbook

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

This invoice was sent to Dr.King is from the 1961 American Peoples Encyclopedia, which gives an account of the events during the year 1960.

Letter from MLK to Lenn Latham

Ohio (OH)

Dr. King expresses gratitude for support of his work and advises that nonviolence is the only way to achieve change.

Speech at Chicago Freedom Movement Rally

Sunday, July 10, 1966
Chicago, IL, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, PUERTO RICO

Dr. King speaks of the urgent need to address issues in the city such as deplorable housing conditions, discrimination in employment, segregation and overcrowded schools. He urges his listeners to commit to fill up the jails if necessary, register every eligible Negro to vote, withhold rent from slumlords, withdraw economic support from companies that don't hire Negroes, and support Negro-owned businesses. He stresses the importance of using nonviolent methods.

"Outrage in Alabama"

Sunday, May 5, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Maryland (MD), Baltimore, MD, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference reprinted the article, "Outrage in Alabama," which was originally printed in The New York Times. The article describes violent acts against civil rights demonstrators discussing the flaws within the legal system.

Letter from Bertha Nichols to MLK

Thursday, February 4, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King is extended an invitation to deliver the keynote address for the 70th birthday of E. Washington Rhodes, Publisher of the Philadelphia Tribune. The Philadelphia Tribune is one of the nation's oldest bi-weekly Negro newspapers and Rhodes is a well-known staunch advocate for justice. Bertha Nichols, Secretary-Treasurer of the newspaper, asks Dr. King to make a special address in honor of Rhodes.

Is Nonviolence Effective


Rev. P. R. Regamey writes a paper that discusses whether or not nonviolence is effective. He uses Gandhi's methods as a basis for the paper. Rev. Regamey also addresses the broader theory and practice of nonviolence.

Committee to Defend Martin Luther King, Jr. Press Release

Thursday, March 3, 1960
Alabama (AL), New York (NY), New York, NY, Montgomery, AL, Chicago, IL, Birmingham, AL

Bayard Rustin announces the formation of the Committee to Defend Martin Luther King, Jr. The Committee was formed in response to charges against Dr. King being filed by Alabama. The Committee intends to raise $200,000 in support of Dr. King and the SCLC.

Press Conference Statement on New York

Wednesday, July 29, 1964
New York (NY)

Dr. King addresses the city of New York and the problem of mounting violence. Dr. King urges the city to help take a stand by promoting social justice through nonviolence efforts and strategies.

Order of Contingents In April Parade in New York

New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM

This document lists the parade order for an anti-Vietnam war demonstration in New York. It also lists official slogans and regulations concerning the use of signs and placards.

Bayard Rustin: Right to Work Laws

Saturday, February 18, 1967
New York (NY), Alabama (AL), Arkansas (AR), Mississippi (MS), Texas (TX), North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC), Georgia (GA), Tennessee (TN), Virginia (VA), Florida (FL), PUERTO RICO

This booklet, written chiefly by Bayard Rustin, suggests that the "Right to Work" laws handicap minorities in the American workforce. The "Right to Work" law is a statute that bans union security agreements, which Rustin posits is undemocratic and assists in exploiting and perpetuating American poverty.

Letter from H. L. Wynter to Dora McDonald

Monday, May 17, 1965

H. L. Wynter writes to Ms. McDonald stating new developments regarding Dr. King's visit to Jamaica in hopes that Dr. King and Mrs. King can adjust.

Letter from MLK to Michael J. Quill

Thursday, August 24, 1961
New York (NY)

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Michael J. Quill's dedication to the "front lines" during a libel case. Dr. King informs Mr. Quill of the current status of the case and the courts response. He further provides Mr. Quill with the operations in the south and their deep involvement in the "Freedom Ride."

Letter from Coretta Scott King to Velma B. Hall

Wednesday, October 12, 1960
Atlanta, GA

Mrs. King addressed this correspondence to Velma Hall, in 1960. In this document, Mrs. King extended apologies for the delay in sending her biographical information.

Letter from MLK to Professor William Goldsmith

Thursday, October 17, 1963
Massachusetts (MA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King sends his appreciation to Professor William Goldsmith for the contribution made by the students and faculty of Brandeis University to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from MLK to Rev. John Porter

Tuesday, October 9, 1962
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to John T. Porter for his participation in and support of the movement in Albany, Georgia.

Man (Cause of Sin)

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr’s “The Nature and Destiny of Man.”

Telegram from Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights to MLK

Thursday, August 9, 1962
Albany, GA, Birmingham, AL, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL)

The Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights and its executives offer support to Dr. King, who is imprisoned in the Albany jail.

Letter from MLK to Richard C. Ernst

Wednesday, August 23, 1961
New York, NY, Birmingham, AL, McComb, MS

Dr. King writes Richard Ernst and thanks him for his generous contribution which "has tangibly resolved a part of the difficulty we face in the legal defense of Rev. Abernathy." Dr. King highlights some the programs the SCLC has been able to implement due to contributions, such as the Citizenship School Training Center and voter registration drives.


Dr. King quotes John Watson's "Behaviorism" on the two things that incite fear.

Letter from H. Rogosin to MLK

Tuesday, August 8, 1967
California (CA), Atlanta, GA

H. Rogosin writes to Dr. King encouraging him to read the enclosed material on "The Role of Psychologists in Helping Solve Problems of Intergroup and Racial Tensions."

Telegram from Richard Daley to Dr. King

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Richard Daley is requesting Dr. King's presence at the Mayor's office to discuss ways of improving the education, employment, health, and living conditions to help the youth in the city of Chicago. Department Heads will be present at the meeting to answer questions and discuss recommendations that aid the city in achieving their goals.

Invitation to Dinner for General Dwight D. Eisenhower

Wednesday, October 28, 1964
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. King received this formal invitation to attend and be seated on the dais at The Family of Man Award Dinner in honor of General Dwight D. Eisenhower, at the Hotel Astor on 10/28/64.

Telegram from Walter T. Dixon to MLK

Saturday, October 17, 1964
Baltimore, MD, Maryland (MD), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Walter T. Dixon, a City Councilman from Baltimore, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.


Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman's "The Wrestle of Religion with Truth" on man's need to adjust himself to events.

Donation Receipt

Thursday, January 13, 1966
Atlanta, GA, New Orleans, LA

This document is a receipt for a donation made to the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc.

Malcolm X Memorial Flyer

Thursday, February 22, 1968
New York, NY

The United Federation of Parents, Teachers and Students present the Malcolm X Memorial flyer saluting American Freedom Fighters. Honorees include LeRoi Jones, Bill Epton and Dr. Benjamin Spock. Slated guest speaker, H. Rap Brown and many other community activists/entertainers.

Letter from Sam Gasbarre to MLK

Monday, August 21, 1967

Sam Gasbarre, identifying himself as a white American, writes Dr. King to support his opinion that the Vietnam War is evil and should end.

Letter from Wilfred Laurier Husband to John B. Oakes of the New York Times

Friday, April 7, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Chicago, IL, Los Angeles, CA

Wilfred Husband writes John Oakes, Editorial Page Editor of the New York Times, regarding an article. As a consistent reader of the Magazine, Husband expresses his displeasure with an article that refers to the civil right movement's attention to the war in Vietnam as "wasteful and self-defeating." Husband explains how war and civil rights are inseparable and that stating anything in opposition hurts the cause of the movement.

Letter from David Kairys to MLK and SCLC

Saturday, June 17, 1967
New York, NY

Mr. Kairys writes Dr. King to express his support of Dr. King's stand against the Vietnam War as well as Dr. King's approach to civil rights issues.

Letter from MLK to David J. Walker

Wednesday, January 13, 1965

Dr. King declines an invitation from the Junior Board of Trade to speak in Toronto.