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"WESTERN SAHARA"

Letter from MLK to the Nobel Institute

Wednesday, January 25, 1967

Dr. King nominates Thich Nhat Hanh, a Buddhist monk from Vietnam, for the Nobel Peace Prize. He describes Hanh's accomplishments and assures that he is "an apostle of peace and non-violence.

Moving to Another Mountain

Wesleyan University publishes an edited transcript of a speech given by Dr. King in 1964. The publication is made in the aftermath of Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Mr. Stephen Benedict to MLK

Tuesday, November 28, 1967

In this letter Mr. Benedict is writing on behalf of Mrs. Ann R. Pierson to notify Dr. King of her contribution to the American Foundation on Nonviolence.

Fleeing From God

This sermon, delivered by Dr. King on April 4, 1956, discusses the human desire to escape God. Dr. King attributes this inclination to the fact that man wants to hide from God's immanent nature and harbors a general unwillingness to follow God's commandments.

Letter from Beatrice Schultz to MLK

Thursday, August 11, 1966

Beatrice Schultz responds to a letter from Dr. King and expresses her appreciation towards him for explaining his stance on "Black Power." She also encloses a contribution to further demonstrate her support of Dr. King.

SCLC Newsletter: April - May 1964

This second volume of the SCLC Newsletter includes a wide variety of articles on the organization's recent interests and activities. The feature article reports the success of the historic Selma to Montgomery march, and other articles touch on the SCLC's efforts to register new voters.

Bayard Rustin: Goals and Strategies

Thursday, August 20, 1964

In this speech, given before Bowdoin College in 1964, Bayard Rustin outlines the basis of civil rights issues currently being fought for. He argues that man must come together as one and face the problem with our society, and that African Americans see the problems with society more than other races because they are struggling to bring civil rights and social change to all.

Letter from Annon M. Card to Robert L. Green

Monday, November 14, 1966

Annon Card, vice president of Texaco, assures Robert L. Green that an investigation is being conducted regarding the circumstances stated in Green's previous letter.

Letter from Barry Gray to Jackie Robinson

Monday, August 22, 1966

Barry Gray, an influential American radio personality, writes Jackie Robinson expressing his disappointment with how he dealt with countering issues. According to Gray, Robinson sent a letter to "distinguished Americans, including his friends" and presumably blackmailed him. Gray discusses his input in the Civil Rights Movement through exposing unequal systems through television and radio.

People In Action: Nothing Changing Unless

Sunday, January 28, 1962

In his regular column in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King writes in support of a 435 million dollar job training bill that would "salvage a segment of the unemployed and potentially employable."

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King cites W. K. Wright's "A Student Outline of Philosophy of Religion."

A Message from Jail

Saturday, July 21, 1962

After being arrested and charged with parading without a license, Dr. King wrote a column from jail. The column shared his and Ralph David Abernathy's decision to serve the jail sentence instead of paying a fine of $178.

Letter of Support from Dorothy Hill to MLK

Saturday, July 1, 1967

Miss Dorothy P. Hill writes this letter to Dr. King thanking him for sending a copy of his book "Where do we go From Here: Chaos or Community?" As previous Director of the Summer Institute for Social Progress at Wellesley College, Hill learned that "skin color seems no bar to congeniality," and she knows of many others who have had similar positive experiences. Hill writes that she admires Dr. King for his principles and leadership ability.

Remarks by MLK at the Freedom House Annual Dinner

Tuesday, November 26, 1963

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for being honored by Freedom House. He also pays tribute to the life and work of John F. Kennedy while encourging others to honor his memory through their dedication to civil rights.

MLK on Communist Infiltration

Dr. King responds to an article written by Joseph Alsop and J. Edgar Hoover that charged communism had infiltrated the Civil Rights Movement.

Reading, Writing, and Race Relations

Thursday, June 1, 1967

Dorothy Singer wrote this piece,"Reading, Writing and Race Relations", regarding the racial integration in schools. Singer discusses several studies and their findings regarding integration.

United Nations Association-Hawaii Chapter

Monday, April 8, 1968

The card, shown here, is an expression of condolence and gratitude from the Hawaii chapter of the United Nations Association, in the form of a "lei of love".

Envelope addressed to Coretta Scott King from the House of Representatives

This envelope is addressed to Coretta Scott King and originates from Congress. Notable are the stamps denoting the date of the post mark and date of receipt, six and eleven days, respectively, after the day of Dr. King's assassination.

Note Regarding Boycotting Olympic Game

This is a brief handwritten note of appreciation for encouraging the boycott of the Olympic Games.

Letter from Harper & Row to Joan Daves regarding "Why We Can't Wait"

Monday, May 11, 1964

Harper & Row informs Joan Daves about the receipt of the quote on Dr. King from Harry Golden, Editor of the Carolina Israelite.

Essay on Walter Rauschenbusch

This essay exams Walter Rauschenbushch views on the relationship between the Church and Society.

Letter from Betty D. Richardson to MLK

Wednesday, February 22, 1967

Betty Richardson reminds Dr. King of his speaking engagement for the American Friends Service Committee 50th Anniversary Dinner.

Letter from the Assistant Secretary of State to Fay Ramsey Regarding Vietnam

Thursday, August 17, 1967

In this letter from Dixon Donnelley (the Assistant Secretary of State), Fay Ramsey receives thanks for a letter she sent President Johnson and an explaination of the state's logic regarding the Vietnam situation.

Letter from Unitarian Universalist Association President Dana McLean Greeley to MLK

Monday, March 22, 1965

Dana McLean Greeley asks for Dr. King's endorsement of a conference on religion and peace to be held in Washington, DC, and invites Dr. King to serve on the Executive Committee of the conference. Greeley also recounts his time spent in Selma and mentions that he will be in Montgomery soon.

Letter from Johnnie Jones to MLK

Mr. Jones requests that Dr. King send $54.00 to his home to help with his bills. Mr. Jones also requests that Dr. King consider him for painting services.

Letter from E. M. Blaz to MLK

Thursday, July 27, 1967

Mr. Blaz writes Dr. King to inform him about the formation of the Negro organization Chicago Central Service Bureau. This organization is an enterprise that includes a variety of programs that offer education towards consumer loans, mortgage loans, travel agencies, insurance, etc.

Vote of Confidence for Negro Leader

Wednesday, January 24, 1968

In this editorial, a study of 300 negro in 13 cities, was conducted to determine the public attitude towards Dr. King.

Letter from Apuyva J. Mehta to MLK

Monday, October 2, 1967

Written on the day of Mahatma Gandhi's birthday, Mehta requests Dr. King's autograph.

Letter from Meir Weiss to MLK

Saturday, August 5, 1967

Meir Weiss reports the facts that he has learned about Dr. King. He also requests an autographed picture and additional information about Dr. King's life.

Speech at Chicago Freedom Movement Rally

Sunday, July 10, 1966

Dr. King speaks of the urgent need to address issues in the city such as deplorable housing conditions, discrimination in employment, segregation and overcrowded schools. He urges his listeners to commit to fill up the jails if necessary, register every eligible Negro to vote, withhold rent from slumlords, withdraw economic support from companies that don't hire Negroes, and support Negro-owned businesses. He stresses the importance of using nonviolent methods.