Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"WESTERN SAHARA"

Letter from Mrs. R. K. Matthews to Mrs. King

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

This letter is from a middle class housewife who expressed her despair and frustration to Mrs. King in learning of Dr. King's assassination.

Telegram from Mrs. Adams and Son to MLK

Sunday, September 21, 1958
New York (NY), New York, NY

Mrs. Adams and her son wish Dr. King a "speedy recovery."

Dr. King Sermon Outline - "Moral Absolutism"

Dr. King drafted this handwritten outline entitled "Moral Absolutism." The focus is on judgement and its relation to both good and evil.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, March 27, 1964
New York, NY

Joan Daves sends three checks to Dr. King. The first check is an advance due from Harper and Row, the second represents an advance from NAL and the third is a partial payment from "Life."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Katherine McBride

Tuesday, February 22, 1966
Pennsylvania (PA)

Dora McDonald responds to the President of Bryn Mawr College expressing that Dr. King has committed to being the key note speaker for the upcoming graduation. Following the letter is the official commencement invitation.

Letter from John B. Morris to Alfred Hardman

Wednesday, July 3, 1963
Atlanta, GA

The Executive Director of the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity writes the Lovett School Board of Trustees regarding the decision not to accept Negroes. Reverend John Morris informs Reverend Alfred Hardman that the church does not agree with the decision and will protest it. Dr. King's son, Martin Luther King III was one of the students not admitted into the school.

MLK's Own Ticket to the SCLC Banquet

Friday, October 25, 1963
Atlanta, GA

Sometimes you buy your own ticket to your own show!

Letter from High School Student Jeanne Adams to MLK

Thursday, May 16, 1963
Detroit, MI, Birmingham, AL

Joanne Adams, a student from Central High School, writes Dr. King to voice her support for what he is doing for negro citizens in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter to MLK from Alan Westin

Friday, April 8, 1966
New York, NY

Alan F. Westin invites Dr. King to serve on the Board of Governors of the Center for Research and Education in American Liberties of Columbia Univeristy and Teachers College. Westin describes the mission of the Center and asks Dr. King to join in their efforts of developing civil rights teaching techniques to be used in all levels of public education.

Letter from Dora McDonald to K. Natwar Singh

Monday, February 8, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY, INDIA

Enclosed is an article that was originally sent to Mr. K. Natwar Singh from Dr. King. The article discusses Jawaharial Nehru and his fight for peace. In the article, Dr. King expresses the importance of Nehru's beliefs to the United States.

Wave of Violence Against Blacks

Philadelphia, PA, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Minnesota (MN), New York, NY

This pamphlet produced by the NAACP, New York Branch, begins with the discussion of a controversial statement made by Senator James Eastland and its adverse affect of increased violence among blacks. Eastland attacked the Supreme Court's desegregation edict by stating, "You are not required to obey any court which passes out such a ruling. In fact, you are obligated to defy it." Newspaper clippings are shown with headlines that illustrate the violence, murder, bombings, and attacks blacks faced.

Spencer, Herbert

Dr. King quotes Herbert Spencer's "First Principles" on the subject of evolution.

Letter to Coretta Scott King from Fern McQuesten at the United Nations Assn of Hawaii

Monday, April 8, 1968
Hawaii (HI)

Ms. McQuesten extends condolences to Mrs. King and recalls fond memories of a meeting with Dr. King. She writes, "I met Mr. King many years ago...he will always be beckoning us on to greater achievements for mankind."

Do the Following to Keep National Attention Focused on Selma

Selma, AL, New York, NY, Alabama (AL), New York (NY), Dallas, TX, Texas (TX), California (CA)

Dr. King composes a list of activities that will keep national attention focused on Selma. Written on Waldorf Astoria Hotel stationary, the list includes measures such as contacting top level government officials like President Johnson, organizing a march, and enlisting the help of celebrities. Dr. King concludes the list by emphasizing "We must insist that voting is the issue and here Selma has dirty hands."

Letter from P. A. Riley to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967
Ohio (OH), New York, NY, New York (NY), VIETNAM

A critic writes Dr. King a carefully constructed letter to share her view on his Vietnam War stance. As a widow of a late Korean War veteran, she claims that Dr. King's position undermines "everything that our fighting men, down thru the long, long, years, have fought and died for." The widow questions Dr. King's combination of civil rights and peace movement issues, and asserts "patriotism is one of the factors free men live and prosper under!"

Western Union Telegram from James McDaniel to MLK

Tuesday, October 25, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY, Mississippi (MS)

Mr. McDaniel invites Dr. King to serve as a member of the executive committee of the National Citizens Committee for the Child Development Program in Mississippi.

Invoice for The 1961 American Peoples Encyclopedia Yearbook

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

This invoice was sent to Dr.King is from the 1961 American Peoples Encyclopedia, which gives an account of the events during the year 1960.

Letter from Ernestine Comegys to SCLC

Monday, April 5, 1965
New Jersey (NJ), Atlanta, GA

Ernestine Comegys writes the SCLC in hopes of obtaining commemorative plates of Dr. King containing his biography on the back. Comegys plans to sell the plates at her church.

Worship (Definition)

Dr. King defines worship as contemplation on the whole of existence.

Letter from FBI Director John Edgar Hoover to MLK

Monday, March 29, 1965
Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL)

J. Edgar Hoover, Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, thanks Dr. King for his telegram regarding the work of Special Agents of the Bureau in Alabama.

Photograph of MLK

GERMANY

Guenther Jacobs from Germany sends Dr. King a photo for him to autograph.

Letter from Wyatt Walker to Hy Resnick

Friday, December 8, 1961
New York (NY)

On behalf of Dr. King, Wyatt Walker thanks Hy Resnick and the Mount Vernon YM & YWHA for their efforts to raise money to aid the civil rights movement. He then suggests a number of entertainers that might be useful through Harry Belafonte's associations.

Letter from George Altman to MLK

Tuesday, December 10, 1963
New York (NY), BRAZIL, New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

George Altman informs Dr. King that one of his friends purchased a recording of Dr. King's speech entitled "The Great March to Freedom" and inquires about receiving the text of the speech.

Letter from Attorney General Robert Kennedy to MLK

Wednesday, October 23, 1963
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Attorney General Robert Kennedy sends Dr. King a copy of his testimony before the House Judiciary Committee about civil rights legislation.

Sin

Dr. King cites a scripture from the "Book of Isaiah" referencing the universality of sin.

Letter from MLK to James Marley

Tuesday, October 15, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King thanks James Marley for his contribution to the SCLC and gives a brief summary of how the funds benefit the Negro communities.

Letter from Ernesto R. Rodriguez, Jr. to MLK

Friday, September 2, 1966
PHILIPPINES, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Ernesto Rodriguez invites Dr. King to address the College Editors Guild Alumni Association at their 35th Anniversary Celebration.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Roebuck

In this handwritten draft letter, Dr. King informs Mr. Roebuck that he has misplaced Mr. Roebuck's check intended for the "Freedom Movement," and thanks him for his support while requesting a replacement check.

Speech to the American Psychological Association

Friday, September 1, 1967
Washington, D.C.

In this speech on the 75th anniversary of the American Psychological Association, Dr. King acknowledges the help that social science can have in the quest of Negroes for equality. He identifies three areas for study: Negro leadership, the efficacy of political action, and the psychological and ideological changes taking place in Negroes as a result of a decade of struggle.

Women Strike for Peace: How Can You Be Silent?

Thursday, April 1, 1965
New Jersey (NJ), New York (NY), Connecticut (CT), VIETNAM

This newsletter exemplifies the struggle that Vietnamese children faced during the war. It also urges many to protest in order to prevent young children from dying.