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"Virginia (VA)"

God

Dr. King expounds on "the eternality of God" by using the Book of Psalms.

The Nationalism of Ezra

This note card outlines Ezra views on "mixed marriages."

Letter from Joan Daves Regarding International Travel

Tuesday, September 15, 1964

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that she telephoned Mr. Smeaton regarding lodging arrangements in London and Berlin.

Letter from Paul Eshelman to MLK

Wednesday, August 31, 1966

Mr. Eshelman writes to Dr. King in support of his efforts toward helping African Americans become "first class citizens."

God: Attributes, Relation to World et.

Dr. King references numerous biblical scriptures on the attributes of God.

Letter from Henry H. Arrington to Paul Whelehon about P. Ballantine & Sons Employment of Negroes

Thursday, January 12, 1967

The letter references letters between Arrington and John Farrell, regarding the employment of a Negro representative. Mr. Kiah Sayles, a representative of P. Ballantine & Sons, explained that P. Ballantine & Sons was the first company to hire Negro models which elevated Negroes in executive positions. Sayles went on to explain the liberal hiring policy of Coyle Beverage, a distributor of P. Ballantine and Sons.

Letter to Ralph David Abernathy from Allen L. Johnson

Tuesday, April 30, 1968

Southern Christian Leadership Conference board member Allen L. Johnson wrote this letter to Rev. Abernathy shortly after Dr. King's death. Johnson expressed his support of Rev. Abernathy's leadership of the organization.

Spring Mobilization Committee Roundup of Nationwide Mobilization Activity

Monday, April 3, 1967

This document outlines activities around the country leading up to the April 15 Spring Mobilization Against the War in Vietnam rally in New York City.

The Lonesome Road

Wednesday, July 12, 1967

Stanley D. Levison sends Dr. King an article from The Washington Post titled "The Lonesome Road," which is a review of Dr. Kings book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" Martin Duberman, the author of the article, explains Dr. King's reasons for writing the book, and Duberman also provides a favorable review of the publication.

Letter from Peter S. Shults to NAACP

Wednesday, August 25, 1965

Peter Shults writes the NAACP requesting a comment on a postcard he received that depicts Dr. King as a communist. He asks multiple questions regarding the validity of the picture on the postcard.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Martin Peretz

Wednesday, October 11, 1967

In this letter, Ms. McDonald informs Dr. Peretz that Dr. King will be able to have lunch with him and that he will be accompanied by Reverend Andrew Young, Reverend Bernard Lee and herself.

Letter from Dr. C. O. Simpkins to MLK

Friday, March 19, 1965

Dr. Simpkins writes Dr. King to discuss the actions he has taken to end discrimination in the Dental Society. He expresses that a letter from national leaders like Dr. King would assist him greatly in his endeavors with the American Dental Association.

Letter from MLK to Philip Lubliner

Wednesday, August 23, 1961

Dr. King expresses gratitude for Mr. Lubliner's support during the "freedom struggle in the South."

Worship

Dr. King notes some attributes and results of worship.

Letter from a Disillusioned Supporter to MLK

Tuesday, July 26, 1966

An anonymous author, who identifies himself as a "white Jew," explains his decision to withdraw financial support from Negro organizations and causes. The reasons for his lack of support include the death of two Jews in Philadelphia, who died aiding the Negro cause, and the rioting in cities.

Letter from MLK to Senator Henry M. Jackson

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Senator Henry M. Jackson expressing gratitude for his support in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from David Brandyberry to MLK

Thursday, June 20, 1963

David Brandberry, a student 16 years of age, informs Dr. King that he desires to voice his opinion about the racial issues in the south. Mr. Brandberry cannot comprehend the logical reasoning of racism and the motives of the "ignorant whites." Furthermore, the student discusses the issues of immigration and the political concept of communism. Mr. Brandberry states that he "wish he had been born a Negro" to he could be of more assistance in the movement.

Letter from W. L. Overholser to MLK

Saturday, August 13, 1966

W.L. Overholser of Winnimac, Indiana proposes that the SCLC change its tactics and support the Peace Welfare Party that he is forming. He maintains that, because too few people control too much of the country's wealth, a lack of jobs creates too much feuding and racial prejudice. Overholser argues that neither party can serve both the richest 10%, who control all the wealth, and the other 90% of the country, because the disparity makes most politicians two-faced. Overholser feels that whites and blacks should focus on forming a new party, and asks Dr.

Telegram from A. G. Downing to MLK

Monday, October 19, 1964

A. G. Downing, executive secretary of the Southern California Baptist Convention, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter to the Editor of the New York Times

Monday, April 17, 1967

On April 15, 1967, a massive antiwar demonstration was held in New York City. Demonstrators marched from Central Park to the United Nations building where they were addressed by prominent political activists such as Dr. King, Floyd McKissick, Stokely Carmichael, James Bevel, Jan Berry Crumb, and Dr. Benjamin Spock. In this letter, a veteran and demonstrator writes the Editor of the New York Times to express his critical view of an article that reported on the event.

The Martin Luther King Holy Land Pilgrimage

Monday, May 15, 1967

This Martin Luther King Holy Land Pilgrimage press release announces Dr. King's upcoming trip to the Holy Land and provides details about two speeches Dr. King will give.

Southern Leaders Conference letter to Eisenhower

Friday, January 11, 1957

Ministers meeting at the Southern Negro Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration co-signed this letter to Pres. Eisenhower.

Letter from Ethel T. Elsea to MLK

Tuesday, September 17, 1963

Ethel T. Elsea, Assistant Editor of Fleming H. Revell Company, writes Dr. King requesting to use his quotation in Frank S. Mead's unpublished book. Elsea also encloses a release form for the Reverend to sign and return.

The Miami Herald: Who Threw the Bomb?

Wednesday, September 18, 1963

In this newspaper clipping, "Washington Post" columnist Charles Morgan Jr. argues that the responsibility for the Birmingham bombings lies with the entire community.

Telegram from Joseph Lowery to Wyatt Walker

Friday, November 3, 1967

Reverend Joseph E. Lowery writes to Reverend Wyatt Walker acknowledging his support of Walker's "sacrifice in behalf of freedom and justice for all."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Eartha Kitt

Wednesday, January 24, 1968

Dr. King's secretary Dora McDonald commends actress Eartha Kitt for speaking "as a woman, among women.” Responding to a question by the First Lady at a White House luncheon hosted by Lady Bird Johnson, Kitt linked youth violence to the Vietnam War.

Financial Statement for SCLC - OEO

Monday, May 15, 1967

The Anti-Poverty Coordinating Committee of the SCLC sends this budget outline to the Office of Economic Opportunity in request of financial changes.

Permission Form from Friendship House to MLK for Signature

Sunday, December 11, 1966

This document, from James G. Duignan of Friendship House, is sent to Dr. King for his signature, granting permission to reproduce, distribute and or sell recorded copies of two speeches.

Letter from MLK to Rev. M. C. Williams

Tuesday, April 24, 1962

Dr. King thanks Rev. Murphy C. Williams for his hospitality during his visit to Denver and for raising funds for the SCLC.

We are Still Walking

Saturday, December 1, 1956

Dr. King describes how African Americans reacted to the Klan's plan to intimidate them after the decision of the Supreme Court. Although deeply involved in the bus protest, Dr. King stated that there were other goals to achieve such as establishing a bank and credit union in Montgomery for African Americans.