Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Virginia (VA)"

Dr. King Sermon Notes

Missouri (MO)

Under the subject, "The Vision of a World Made New," Dr. King drafted these sermon notes. The essential message of the sermon referred to a need for a "new world order". Plato and Karl Marx are two of the great philosophers referenced in this document. Dr. King delivered this sermon at the annual meeting of the Woman's Convention Auxiliary, National Baptist Convetion in St. Louis, Missouri on September 9, 1954.

Jesus Christ

Dr. King quotes Karl Barth's "Dogmatics in Outline" on Jesus and his relationship to God.

Letter from M.J. McGrayle to MLK

Friday, December 30, 1966
Chicago, IL, Birmingham, AL, Florida (FL)

M.J. McGrayle from Chicago expresses his or her concerns to Dr. King. McGrayle does not understand some of the actions of African Americans and disagrees with Dr. King's marches. The author believes that many of the events taking place within the Civil Rights Movement are further separating the races, as "black people are afraid of" whites. As a white person, McGrayle states, "I lived in Birmingham, Ala[bama] and took the colored peoples part," though now in disagreement, will "do nothing more for the colored people."

Letter from Clifford L. Alexander to MLK

Monday, January 29, 1968
Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH, UNITED KINGDOM, Indiana (IN), New Jersey (NJ)

Clifford L. Alexander, Chairman for the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, wrote to Dr. King to encloses some clippings from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission News Digest, the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, and the Washington Post regarding the EEOC's hearings on white collar discrimination in New York.

Letter from George Altman to MLK

Tuesday, December 10, 1963
New York (NY), BRAZIL, New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

George Altman informs Dr. King that one of his friends purchased a recording of Dr. King's speech entitled "The Great March to Freedom" and inquires about receiving the text of the speech.

Letter from Harriet Davis to Dr. King Regarding Eugene Peterson's editorial

Sunday, July 30, 1967
Georgia (GA)

In this letter, Harriet Davis informs Dr. King that she is a white women who has decided to teach at a Fairmont High School, which was formerly completely Negro. Although she has received criticism for her decision she proclaims that her motivations are right. She then informs Dr. King that she fears not being able to understand her co-workers and students.

Letter from Hubert H. Humphrey to MLK Regarding an Invitation

Wednesday, July 8, 1964
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL

In this letter Senator Hubert Humphrey urges Dr. King to accept an invitation to speak at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association.

Letter from E. R. Boynton to SCLC

Monday, March 18, 1968
Michigan (MI), Ohio (OH)

Mr. Boynton inquires about a financial contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Fund for which he has not received a receipt.

Letter from Thomas Richardson to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY

Thomas Richardson, a New York City student, offers his sympathy the day after Dr. King's assassination. He explains that he recently lost his father, so he understands the sadness Mrs. King feels.

Letter from SNCC's Dorothy Miller to MLK

Monday, March 25, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Greenwood, MS

Dorothy Miller of SNCC writes Dr. King informing him of the arson attempt at the SNCC office and thanks him for a previous correspondence regarding the case of Bob Zellner.

Letter from MLK to Artist Committee for SCLC

Friday, May 5, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

This letter expresses Dr. King's regards and deep appreciation to the Artist Committee for their generous contribution. He communicates gratitude on behalf of so many who benefit from the work made possible from their support. Additionally, Dr. King communicates the continued strength and effectiveness of the SCLC in promoting negro-white unity, non-violence, justice and equality.

Handwritten Letter from MLK to "Dorothy"

This document is a draft of an addendum to a letter Dr. King had previously worked on and is addressed to "Dorothy." While most of this document centers on "support" and is based on form templates, Dr. King specifically mentions a "suggestion concerning 'Lil Abuer" [phonetic].

Bold Design for a New South

Saturday, March 30, 1963
Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, Mississippi (MS), North Carolina (NC)

Dr. King notes that civil rights has been replaced as the "Number One" domestic issue, dwarfed by the Cuban missile crisis, trade legislation and tax reform. He attributes this to public acceptance of tokenism as well as an overly cautious administration. While acknowledging that the administration has made greater efforts on civil rights than previous ones, Dr. King says the progress is constricted and confined.

An Order For the Baptism of Adults

Dr. King outlines the order of the baptism service, including specific phrases for the minister to use.

War

Dr. King cites a quote concerning "war" from Oswald Spengler's "The Return of the Caesars," an article featured in The American Mercury.

Letter from MLK to Burke Marshall of the US Justice Department

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General in the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, expressing gratitude for Marshall's leadership in guiding the Civil Rights Act of 1964 through both houses of Congress.

Letter From A. S. Raman to MLK

Thursday, December 8, 1966
INDIA, Indiana (IN)

In this letter, Raman invites Dr. King to be a part of a discussion in the anniversary issue of the Indian Republic by contributing about 800 to the article.

Letter from Elijah Muhammad to MLK

Wednesday, July 6, 1966
Chicago, IL

In this letter, Elijah Muhammad expresses the importance of black unity in the efforts for equality. Elijah Muhammad requests the presence of Dr. King and other prominent civil rights leaders at a meeting to discuss solutions to the ongoing struggle against injustice.

U.S. News and World Report: Is Insurrection Brewing in U.S.?

Monday, December 25, 1967
Washington, D.C., Detroit, MI, Los Angeles, CA, New Jersey (NJ), ALGERIA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, CHINA, VIETNAM, JORDAN, KENYA, CUBA, ANGOLA, CONGO / ZAIRE

This article in the U.S. News and World Report features an interview with Richard H. Sanger, known for his experience in the United States Foreign Service and his abilities to recognize the patterns of political violence.

Birmingham Manifesto

Birmingham, AL

This manifesto details the methods, accomplishments, failures and reasons for the use and postponement of direct action tactics in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter From Bessie Burrett to MLK

Memphis, TN

Bessie Burrett, a NAACP member, writes Dr. King asking for help and explaining the multiple incidences of racial injustice she and her husband have personally witnessed. Burrett describes her husband's injuries, which he obtained as a result of police brutality, and their struggles with unfair treatment in the court system. As a result, her husband is unable to work and they have mounting hospital and court fees to pay, creating a financial hardship for their family.

Schleiermacher (Religion as Contemplation)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Letter from MLK to Clifford P. Case

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Clifford Case, a United States Senator from New Jersey, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from MLK to a Former Supporter

Thursday, July 20, 1967
VIETNAM, FRANCE, CHINA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

This is an edited copy of Dr. King's response to someone withdrawing support due to his position on the Vietnam War. King's detailed rewrites show efforts to avoid further misunderstandings about his position. He applies nonviolent philosophies to both the civil rights and peace movements, however, does not attempt to link the two. Rather than asking for Negroes to be exempt from the draft as a special privilege, he believes Negroes have an intimate knowledge of the effects of violence. As such, they should have a special moral obligation not to inflict violence on others.

Letter from Sanford Kahn to MLK

Wednesday, December 21, 1966
Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Sanford Kahn requests Dr. King's support for an effort to abolish the death penalty at the federal level. If given Dr. King's support, Kahn proposes listing the SCLC as a participating member of the ad hoc committee. If the SCLC cannot be listed, Kahn suggests Dr. King serve as an advisor.

Letter from Edward P. Gottlieb to Editor, New York Times

Thursday, November 23, 1967
New York (NY)

Edward P. Gottlieb writes to the Editor of the New York Times expressing his concern on racial pride. He begins by stating that racial pride is to be deplored and discouraged. Gettlieb concludes with the notion that an African American will feel free only after he is able to explore his own history and culture so he may take from it what he wants for his personal enhancement.

Letter from John Lewis to MLK

Thursday, July 22, 1965
Hawaii (HI), Atlanta, GA

In this letter, John Lewis requests a loan for the amount of $10,000 from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference so that the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee can meet their payroll and cover pressing bills. He then speaks on the importance of continuous dialogue between the SCLC and SNCC.

Schleiermacher and the Bible

Dr. King references a quote from Friedrich Schleiermacher regarding the relationship between religion and sacred texts.

Robert F. Thorne's Response to the SCLC

Tuesday, July 11, 1967
California (CA), VIETNAM, NORTH KOREA, CONGO / ZAIRE

Robert F. Thorne expresses his commitment to the civil rights cause, but will discontinue his financial contributions to the SCLC due to Dr. King's statements regarding the Vietnam War.

Letter from Dora to Joan

Friday, February 24, 1967

In this letter, Dora McDonald sends a photograph to Joan Daves.