Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Virginia (VA)"

Letter from Virginia Madden to Mrs. King

Sunday, October 25, 1964

Virginia Madden, a 91-year-old white woman from Philadelphia, writes to congratulate Mrs. King on Dr. King's winning the Nobel Peace Prize. She says she has deplored racism and welcomes the new Civil Rights Law.

Letter from William Kivi to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967

William Kivi references a statement made by Dr. King at the SCLC convention pertaining to everyone having a "guaranteed income." Kivi's belief is that Republican officials in the state of California continue to chisel away at federal programs designed to give the poor access to health care and other government aid. His recommendation to Dr. King as a solution would be a "restructured national civil service."

Royalty Summary from J. Campe to MLK

Friday, November 4, 1966

This cable from Joan Daves to Dr. King details the earned value of British royalties and the number of copies sold for "Stride Towards Freedom" and "Strength to Love."

Postcard from Westmont College Library to MLK

Thursday, September 28, 1967

The library at Westmont College thanks Dr. King for sending pamphlets and other literature about the SCLC.

Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?

Saturday, December 17, 1966

Dr. King outlines the ten chapters of his book "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Friday, March 29, 1963

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, informs Dr. King that his department is inquiring into events in Greenwood, Mississippi that Dr. King brought to his attention. He assures Dr. King that the Justice Department will take appropriate action with respect to any violations of federal law.

Letter from MLK to William Kivi

Monday, July 17, 1967

In this letter to Mr. William Kivi, Dr. King expresses his view on the representation of the American flag.

Exam for Bible 252 at Morehouse

This is an exam for Dr. King's Bible course, which lasted from September 1946 to May 1947, at Morehouse College. Dr. George D. Kelsey was the professor. Dr. King's notes are in the margins.

Immortality

"Immortality" is the title of this handwritten note card by Dr. King, who documents a story of Socrates and the harp as an analogy to man.

Letter from MLK to Third Grader Debbie Bass

Thursday, June 3, 1965

Dr. King thanks Debbie Bass of New York for her thoughtful letter. Debbie Bass is a third grade student from the Birch Lane School of Massapequa Park. Dr. King expresses that her letter encourages everyone to hasten their efforts in the fight for freedom.

MLK's Address at the Pilgrimage for Democracy

Sunday, December 15, 1963

Dr. King discusses the issues of segregation, poverty and discrimination within the City of Atlanta, in this 1963 speech at the Pilgrimage for Democracy. He explains that although Atlanta was thought to be a place of "racial harmony," the reality of glaring discrimination in Atlanta's schools, restaurants, and housing has left the local Negro community "tired," and hungry for change.

Man

Dr. King records geologist Robert Gheyselinck’s observation about the brevity of human history in relation to the earth’s history

Death

Dr. King documents a quote from Pascal regarding "Death."

Paul's Letter to American Christians Notes

These notes are in reference to a sermon given by Dr. King. The sermon, "Paul's Letter to American Christians," was included in the publishing of Dr. King's second book. Following the popularity of his first narrative, "Stride Toward Freedom," Dr. King was asked to compile some of his sermons into a book entitled "Strength to Love."

Letter from Mr. Burke Marshall to MLK Regarding Political Opinion

Thursday, September 15, 1966

In this document, Mr. Mashall writes to Dr. King regarding issues surrounding the National Advisory Commission on Selective Service. He requests that Dr. King writes on behalf of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference on matters further outlined in Section 2.

Letter from Arthur Jordan to MLK

Thursday, March 25, 1965

Arthur Jordan, General Secretary of St. Thomas Young Men's Christian Association in St. Thomas, Ontario, invites Dr. King to speak at a lecture engagement in Canada.

The Future of Integration

Friday, August 21, 1959

Dr. King discusses the various forms of segregation and the corresponding legislative acts that affect African Americans at the National Convention of the Fellowship of Reconciliation. King also provides details of how he hopes integration will take place.

Letter from Bernetta Chapman to MLK

Bernetta Chapman writes to Dr. King welcoming him to the Westside of Chicago. Chapman heard the Reverend speak at the Buckingham Foundation stating, "there should be more people like you."

Letter from John and Enid Howarth to Friends Soliciting Financial Support

Sunday, June 26, 1966

Mr. and Mrs. Howarth of New Mexico express their disapproval of violence against Negroes in the South and request donations for a Fourth of July celebration in support of SCLC, SNCC and other civil rights groups.

God

Dr. King writes about God, according to Isaiah 40: 12-31.

Letter from Menno Klassen to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967

Menno Klassen offers support on behalf of the Peace Committee of the Mennonite Central Committee for Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War. Klassen explains that Dr. King is facing the same opposition that Jesus Christ did because he is continuing Jesus' work.

Man

Dr. King quotes Jonathan Swift’s scathing assessment of man.

Address to the National Bar Association

Thursday, August 20, 1959

Dr. King shares with the National Bar Association of Milwaukee, the history of segregation and why African Americans fight for equality.

Colwell, Ernest Cadman

Dr. King references Ernest Caldwell's book "Toward Better Theological Education."

Letter from J. Campe to Dr. King Regarding "Stride Toward Freedom"and "Why We Can't Wait"

Monday, March 6, 1967

In this letter is enclosed a check and details of expenses for the Italian Edition of "Stride Toward Freedom and "Why We Can't Wait".

Letter from Barbara Hannagan to MLK

Barbara Hannagan, a student at Gridley Union High School in California, requests information from Dr. King to assist her with a term paper. She expresses her interest in the history of Negroes in America and how that correlates to the current issues of Negroes in "white society."

Postcard from J. Mason

Mason requests that Dr. King focus more on black youth crime rates, orphan children and other charitable activities within the black community.

Address by MLK to American Jewish Committee

Thursday, May 20, 1965

In this speech, Dr. King addresses the Civil Rights Movement and the use of nonviolent demonstration tactics. He distinguishes between civil disobedience, which involves breaking laws that one does not agree with, and nonviolent demonstration, which involves using one's right to protest. He states that nonviolent protest is inherently American, citing examples from the Civil War, the Suffragettes, and the American Jewish Committee's own lobbying from the early 20th Century.

Letter from Nancy Claytor to MLK

Friday, December 2, 1966

Nancy Claytor requests Dr. King's permission to use lines from "Letter From Birmingham City Jail" for the publication "The Methodist Student V-VI."

Schleiermacher

Dr. King quotes theologian Schleiermacher regarding the universe.