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Material to Use Regarding Negro Leaders and Platform Committee

Bayard Rustin sends Dr. King this pre-written answer to be used if the media ask why Dr. King and A. Philip Randolph are not together during the march before the 1960 Democratic National Convention in Los Angeles. The statement explains that Randolph will be in St. Louis to address the campaign to elect the first Negro Senator.

A Resolution for Dr. King from the Church Women United in Atlanta

This is a resolution honoring Dr. King's life and work upon his untimely death.

Letter from Cantor Solomon Mendelson to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, February 1, 1966

Cantor Mendelson of Congregation Beth Sholom writes to Miss McDonald requesting some of Dr. King's biographical material. Cantor Mendelson also informs her that he has met with Dr. King's attorney, Clarence Jones, to discuss the "I Have A Dream" as a "basis of a musical work."

People In Action: The School Boycott Concept

Saturday, April 11, 1964

Dr. King expounds on the effectiveness of school boycotting to combat the issues of de facto segregation. Initially, Dr. King sought boycotting as a creative nonviolent approach to intolerable racial conditions, but he expresses some concern with children involvement in "adult issues" such as civil rights. However, Dr. King states children are affected and since they are the next generation, should partake in the improvement endeavors of the society. The article further details ideologies and methods surrounding the school boycotts.

History: Voltaire

Dr. King references a quote from the philosopher and historian Voltaire.

Letter to Dora MacDonald from Joan Daves

Monday, December 12, 1966

Joan Daves writes to Ms. McDonald regarding Dr. King's availability, while he's away in New York. She also requests that a copy of the transcript, from a conference, be given to Dr. King as well as herself.

Letter from MLK to Congressman Charles C. Diggs, Jr.

Wednesday, July 17, 1963

Dr. King responds to the concerns of Congressman Charles Diggs regarding the March on Washington. He encloses a privately distributed memorandum about the march that Dr. King believes will answer the questions Congressman Diggs has about the march. Dr. King also briefly explains the purpose and some logistics of the march.

Letter from MLK to David Dubinsky of the International Ladies Garment Workers Union

Tuesday, June 16, 1964

Dr. King thanks David Dubinsky of the International Ladies Garment Workers Union for their thoughtful donation to SCLC. The contribution will be used to assist the SCLC in voter registration, direct action and other methods to combat racial injustice.

Letter from Harry Walker to Dora McDonald

Thursday, September 21, 1967

Harry Walker summarizes a recent conversation he held with Dora McDonald, Mrs. Tobye Karl, and Particia Hederman that outlined the dates of future speaking engagements for Dr. King.

Letter from George W. Parker

Tuesday, June 19, 1962

George Parker explains his theory of mind control as a "mass electronic psychological weapon." He also details how this weapon is currently being employed.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to Mr. Gosta Dahl

Thursday, June 11, 1964

In this letter, dated June 11, 1964 to Mr. Gosta Dahl, Joan Daves expresses the importance of "Why We Can't Wait" and why they feel it is a "...potentially more successful" work than Dr. King's other two books. Accordingly, they request minimum advance and royalty schedules. She asks that Mr. Dahl check with the Swedish publishers to see if they would raise their offer, for the use of Dr. King's work.

Letter from Joan Daves to Mrs. Dora McDonald about expenses from trip to New York

Tuesday, June 9, 1964

Dr. and Mrs. King extended their stay in New York City to launch his latest book. Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, wrote to Dora McDonald requesting lodging receipts in an effort to expedite the expense reporting process with Harper Publishing. Handwritten notes on the document suggest that the launch was very successful.

James H. Halsey Writes MLK About Alumni Solicitation

Friday, March 15, 1963

James H. Halsey writes Dr. King about financial support for the University of Bridgeport and its program.


Dr. King cites the many ways in which the concept of Monism is applied.

Letter from the Morrissetts to MLK and Mrs. King

Sunday, November 30, 1958

Elizabeth Morrissett wishes the King family a Merry Christmas. Mrs. Morrisset also invites Dr. King to come speak at a Purdue University Convocation.

SCLC Administrator Job Description

Monday, August 29, 1966

This document outlines the responsibilities of the role of an Administrator for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Morton M. Brooks to MLK

Wednesday, November 4, 1964

Morton Brooks writes Dr. King to check his availability for April, May, or June of 1965 to speak at Mt. Zion's Sunday morning church service. Brooks expresses that he is aware of Dr. King's busy schedule, but would appreciate his consideration.


Dr. King summarizes and quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher's view of sin in Christian Faith.

Nonviolence: The Only Road to Freedom

In this article, Dr. King argues that the American Negro's salvation will be reached by "rejecting the racism, materialism and violence that has characterized Western civilization" and working instead toward a world of brotherhood and cooperation. The civil rights leader denounces recent violent uprisings in urban ghettos, as they only contribute to the growing frustrations and issues perpetuating America's racial divide.

Newsletter Regarding Operation Breadbasket

This letter serves as an informational letter on the efforts of Operation Breadbasket. According to the letter, this organization, has provided over 900 jobs for Negroes, opened up services for Negro businessmen and offered other types of assistance.

Letter to Men of Morehouse from Morehouse President Benjamin E. Mays

Morehouse President Benjamin E. Mays discusses the events during Centennial Founders Week at Morehouse College for those who were not in attendance. He also informs the Men of Morehouse of the upcoming commencement ceremony.

Letter from the Brith Abraham Fraternal Order to MLK

Monday, August 21, 1967

Representatives of the Brith Abraham Fraternal Order write Dr. King in response to anti-semitic statements made by members of SNCC. They ask that Dr. King provide a statement that condems SNCC's statement due to the fact the Jewish community has strongly supported the civil rights movement.

"Attorney's Arrest is Protested"

Thursday, August 18, 1966

This Washington Post article, entitled "Attorney's Arrest is Protested", talks about Arthur Kinoy's arrest and the complications that aroused as a result of it.

Letter and Questionnaire from Ronald B. Lee to MLK

Ronald B. Lee, a student of American University, requests that Dr. King complete a questionnaire concerning the SCLC's involvement in the June White House Conference "To Fulfill These Rights." The questions include how the SCLC was informed of this meeting, the conference, contributions, and more.

Letter from Dudley Babcock to MLK

Saturday, October 14, 1967

Dudley P. Babcock writes to Dr. King to assure him he supports his civil rights leadership but questions his involvement in the Vietnam War protests. Babcock reminds Dr. King that there are always pacifists who might need to accept war in order to prevent more war, citing the example of Neville Chamberlain and the escalation of violence in World War II.

Daily News: NAACP Anti-South Propaganda Article

Thursday, March 5, 1959

The author writes about a secret meeting that was held at the NAACP's headquarters regarding race identification.

Post Card from Archie Brest to MLK

A supporter of the Vietnam War expresses his conflicting views regarding the struggle for democracy in Southeast Asia. In order to combat the brutality of North Vietnamese forces, he insists that American military presence will ultimately prove that "terror cannot succeed as a weapon in Vietnam, we shall discourage it's use anywhere."


Dr. King records a quote regarding war from General Omar Bradley in 1950.

Letter from Sister M. Angelice to MLK

Sunday, October 25, 1964

Sister Angelice, Acting President of Ursiline College in Louisville, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and expresses admiration for his civil rights efforts.