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"VIETNAM"

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, May 26, 1965

Joan Daves asks Dora McDonald about obtaining a copy of the speech Dr. King made to the New York City Bar Association.

Letter from the Interseminary Movement's John Robert Nelson to MLK

Friday, August 31, 1962

J. Robert Nelson, National Chairman of the Interseminary Committee, invites Dr. King to be a part of their national conference with theological professors and students for the following year. He hopes that Dr. King will be the speaker on the subject of the Strategy of Churches and Ministers for Social Change.

Letter from MLK to Jimmy Edward

Monday, September 14, 1964

Dr. King acknowledges receipt of Mr. Jimmy Edwards' letter with the kind words concerning his book, "Strength To Love."

Marcian

Dr. King highlights biographical information on Marcian, a second-century reformer.

Letter from Ethelyn Hall to MLK

Saturday, November 30, 1963

Ethelyn L. Hall, a student at the University of Houston, writes Dr. King in reference to SCLC's distribution of literature. Hall is preparing a term paper for a sociology class and requests any available literature relating to civil rights, interracial relations, and racism. She is also interested in learning the purposes and functions of the SCLC.

Letter from Richard Allen to MLK

Wednesday, June 7, 1967

Reverend R. Allen requests Dr. King's written contribution for a special issue of "The Leader" on race relations. "The Leader" is a Christian newspaper that is distributed in different parts of England.

Vietnamese Student's Appeal for Peace

This document reveals that a Vietnamese student burned herself as an appeal for peace. The document also states that some of the writings that she left behind have been translated.

Letter from Betty White to Coretta Scott King

Thursday, March 31, 1966

Betty White, president of The Young Matrons of True Light Baptist Church, invites Mrs. King to be a guest speaker and soloist at an upcoming civil rights program.

Royalty Statement: Why We Can't Wait

Monday, April 3, 1967

This royalty statement details Dr. King's earnings for the book "Why We Can't Wait" over a six month period.

Letter from Alan and June Fite to MLK

Wednesday, April 19, 1967

In this letter dated April 19, 1967, Alan and June Fite commend Dr. King for his speech given at a peace demonstration on April 15 and request a copy of the speech.

Youth, Nonviolence, and Social Change

The conference on "Youth, Nonviolence, and Social Change" at Howard University contains various speakers deriving from various academic disciplines. Dr. King participated in the lecture and discussed how nonviolent methods impacted individuals, especially the youth.

Letter from Kerstin Lindblom to the SCLC

Thursday, September 8, 1966

A Student from Sweden offers to come to America to work for the SCLC. Her letter describes all the ways she wishes to help.

Letter From Jane Hall to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968

Jane Hall writes Dr. King suggesting that there be a focus on equitable representation of the negro in television advertising in order to attain "maximum quality and quantity" of integration.

Face the Nation Interview

Sunday, August 29, 1965

This is a transcript of an August 1965 interview of Dr. King on the CBS television news program Face the Nation. King is asked to comment on numerous issues facing American society including the conflict in Vietnam, civil rights, housing and birth control.

Revelation

Dr. King discusses the idea that Jesus Christ is the only direct form of revelation, which was proposed in Emil Brunner's "The Mediator."

Letter to MLK from Moynihan about Invitation to Conference

Monday, March 27, 1967

A formal letter from the Joint Center for Urban Studies of MIT and Harvard University invites Dr. King to a Conference on Social Statistics and the City at Executive House in Washington, DC, June 22 and 23, 1967. Signed by Director Daniel P. Moynihan, the correspondence cites the inadequacy of the 1960 US census in enumerating the Negro, Puerto Rican, and Mexican populations, a concern about the impact on voting rights, and the need for better enumeration in the 1970 census.

Hungry Club Speech

Wednesday, May 10, 1967

Dr. King speaks on "America's Chief Moral Dilemma." He contends that the dilemma in the world is the result of three major evils: racism, poverty, and war. Dr. King encourages the audience to work toward making America a moral example for the rest of the world.

Newspaper Clippings from New York and New Jersey

These newspaper clippings represent the views of several individuals who are critical of the Black Power Movement, the work ethics of African Americans and the government's policies.

Progress

Dr. King quotes Herbert Spencer regarding the inevitability of progress.

Letter from Rabbi A. Aaron Segal to MLK

Tuesday, October 20, 1964

Rabbi A. Aaron Segal of Springfield, Illinois writes Dr. King a poem honoring him for winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Ms. Dorothy Clark to Rev. Abernathy

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

In this letter accompanying a contribution, Ms. Clark expresses her condolences after Dr. King's assassination and pledges her personal support in continuing his mission.

Letter of Appreciation to MLK from Mrs. A.M.Digilio

Friday, July 30, 1965

In this letter, Mrs. A.M. Digilio writes to Dr. King. Along with her expressions of appreciation, she admits to being one of the millions of whites who have "prayerfully" followed Dr. King's work. Mrs. Digilio states that Dr. King has been a voice to those of the "inarticulate working class", both white and black. She speaks of the unfortunate decline of morality amongst Americans and the necessary Christian might to rectify it. Mrs. Digilio further compares Dr.

Volunteers Serving Program

This report highlights the voluntary efforts of programs serving for social justice along with numerous SCLC contributions.

104:3 General Correspondence 1967 (T)

Friday, April 21, 1967

Richard Tennent Jr. requests that Dr. King consider applying his efforts of non-violence to Cleveland, Ohio "...to help prevent the violence that seems inevitable." Tennent states that he cannot support the Reverend's stance on the Vietnam War, either financially or intellectually.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Cornell E. Talley

Wednesday, April 25, 1962

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Reverend Cornell E. Talley for the contribution from New Light Baptist Church in Detroit, Michigan. Dr. King expresses an interest in speaking at a mid week prayer service at New Light Baptist Church.

Letter from Jane Dahlberg to MLK

Saturday, April 22, 1967

New York University Dean Jane Dahlberg congratulates Dr. King for taking a noble position against the Vietnam War. As a result of his participation in the New York anti-war demonstration, Dahlberg believes that his example of nonviolence was highly emphasized during the march.

Letter to Mrs. King from Mrs. Lawrence Greene

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

In this letter, Mrs. Lawrence Greene offers encouragement to Mrs. King. As such she writes, "You have today made yourself a woman among women. In your time of grief you thought not of yourself but of us that cry in the night."

Sin

Dr. King interprets Leviticus 4:3, a verse which implies that a community can incur guilt for the sins of its high priest.

Ode to Freedom

Monday, July 20, 1959

"Ode to Freedom" is a list of declarations used to inspire and uplift those involved in the movement.

Letter from Joseph A. Campbell to MLK

Tuesday, April 18, 1967

Joseph A. Campbell writes to Dr. King in request of information on demonstrations as a means of expression.