Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"VIETNAM"

Letter from David Mays to Dora McDonald

Monday, October 28, 1963
Tennessee (TN)

David Mays, Chairman of the Department of Speech and Theatre at Austin Peay State College in Clarksville, Tennessee, participates in a continued correspondence with Dora McDonald. Mays inquires if the speech he requested will be under separate cover, as it was not enclosed in the recent letter. He also requests Dr. King's permission to make copies of the speech in order to pass out to students in his Principles of Rhetoric class.

What Is a Cause

Dr. King quotes Alfred North Whitehead's "Principles of Natural Knowledge."

Letter from Dan Aldridge to MLK

Monday, December 23, 1963
Atlanta, GA

Dan A. Aldridge, President of the Foundation Life Insurance Company, recalls a previous visit to Dr. King's home. Aldridge requests an appointment with Dr. King to discuss several important business matters.

Appeal to the President of the United States

Thursday, May 17, 1962
Washington, D.C.

This document, prepared for the centennial of the Emancipation Proclamation, serves as a plea to President Kennedy and a legal brief. The plea is to use the centennial as an opportunity to "rededicate" the nation to the principles embedded in the Emancipation Proclamation; to make an executive order to end all statutory segregation and discrimination in the states; and to exercise full leadership protecting civil rights, including the use of force, if nonviolent methods fail.

Addition to "Pilgrimage to Nonviolence"

This augmentation was intended to be included in Dr. King's "Pilgrimage to Nonviolence" essay published in the Christian Century on April 13, 1960. In the appendage, Dr. King discusses the personal afflictions he has endured as a result of his civil rights work including death threats, bombings of his home, and a near fatal stabbing. He states that suffering has a "redemptive quality" and discusses how he transformed his personal suffering into a "creative force" instead of reacting with bitterness.

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK and Others

Sunday, February 11, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY, NIGERIA, SOUTH AFRICA, VIETNAM

This is a memorandum from Theodore E. Brown concerning his trip to Nigeria. Brown attaches a newspaper article referencing the turmoil in Nigeria.

Letter from Elisabeth Leonard to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967
New York (NY), VIETNAM

Elisabeth Leonard expresses her support and gratitude for Dr. King's work, which includes his speeches about the Vietnam War as well as an upcoming speech on the Spring Mobilization.

Letter with Enclosed Copy of Minutes of the SCLC Board Meeting

Wednesday, August 23, 1967
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Kentucky (KY), Louisville, KY, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Virginia (VA)

Mr. Eskridge sends a copy of the minutes for the SCLC Board Meeting to Secretary Dora McDonald. During the meeting, Andrew Young and Ralph David Abernathy address the twenty-eight board members of the organization at the Regency House in Atlanta, GA.

Foreword of "The Power of Nonviolence"

Thursday, January 1, 1959
New York (NY), DENMARK, NORWAY, FRANCE, NETHERLANDS, GERMANY, SOUTH AFRICA, GHANA, Montgomery, AL, INDIA

This is a copy of a foreword written by Dr. King to Richard Gregg's "The Power of Nonviolence."

Letter from James Dombrowski to MLK

Saturday, November 13, 1965
Louisville, KY, New Orleans, LA

A letter to Dr. and Mrs. King, from Mr. James Dombrowski, thanks them for their support and contribution to SCEF.

William M. Kunstle writes to MLK About the Shuttlesworht-Phifer Case

Monday, December 16, 1963
New York, NY

William M. Kunstler sends Dr. King the decision marks from the Shutllesworth- Phifer case. The case resulted in a victory, but took five years to draw a decision.

Letter from Willis M. Tate to MLK

Wednesday, September 15, 1965
Dallas, TX

Willis M. Tate, President of Southern Methodist University, expresses his gratitude for Dr. King's acceptance to come to the university. He assures Dr. King that his trip is welcomed and presents two alternative dates to address the student body. This address is part of the 50th Anniversary Celebration that Dr. King has already been invited.

Telegram from Bayard Rustin to MLK

Wednesday, October 19, 1966
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Bayard Rustin invites Dr. King to join other civil rights leaders for a meeting that will be held in New York, NY.

Seventh Biennial Religious Conference

New Jersey (NJ)

This is a program for the seventh Biennial Religious Conference at Princeton University. Initially conceived shortly after World War II, the conference continues to confront important issues of human life. Under the leadership of the Student Christian Association, "Integration: Conscience in Crisis" will take place over a span of four days. Topics of the conference include "the historical and social as well as the judicial, international, and theological" implications of segregation and integration.

Letter from Nicholas Katzenbach to MLK

Tuesday, August 30, 1966
Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

Memo from Dora McDonald to MLK

Pennsylvania (PA), Virginia (VA), New York (NY)

This document is a memo updating Dr. King of requests, invitations and current SCLC finances.

Letter from Dr. Neil V. Sullivan to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967
Berkeley, CA

Dr. Neil Sullivan requests that Dr. King write the foreword for his new book, "Set Our Children Free -- In Integrated Schools."

Letter from Edna Smith to Ralph Helstein

Thursday, January 26, 1967
Chicago, IL, South Carolina (SC), Illinois (IL)

In this letter, Edna Smith writes to Mr. Helstein regarding Dorothy Ashford's participation in the Civil Rights Movement. Ashford is a student at Clemson University, who previously worked with the South Carolina Council on Human Relations.

Letter from Julian Bond to Voters

Atlanta, GA

Georgia State Representative Julian Bond requests support for his Georgia House of Representatives re-election bid. Mr. Bond elaborates on planks in his campaign platform concerning education, housing, and employment. Bond was also a long time civil rights activist who helped found the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

Memorandum on direct Action in Alabama Cities

Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL, Virginia (VA)

Dr. King writes a Direct Action plan for the Alabama cities of Birmingham, Danville and Montgomery. He believes that these cities need to focus on the emergence of violence and recommends the integration of Negroes into the police force.

National Conference on Christian Education Brochure

Indiana (IN)

Dr. King was a featured guest speaker of the National Conference on Christian Education. This pamphlet lists the events of the program occurring during August 19-22 of 1958.

Postcard from Jacksonville Beach

Wednesday, February 7, 1968
Jacksonville, FL

This postcard to Dr. King requesting an autograph is one printed by the Jacksonville Beach, Florida Chamber of Commerce.

Letter From Jane Hall to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968
New York, NY

Jane Hall writes Dr. King suggesting that there be a focus on equitable representation of the negro in television advertising in order to attain "maximum quality and quantity" of integration.

Letter from MLK to a Former Supporter

Thursday, July 20, 1967
VIETNAM, FRANCE, CHINA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

This is an edited copy of Dr. King's response to someone withdrawing support due to his position on the Vietnam War. King's detailed rewrites show efforts to avoid further misunderstandings about his position. He applies nonviolent philosophies to both the civil rights and peace movements, however, does not attempt to link the two. Rather than asking for Negroes to be exempt from the draft as a special privilege, he believes Negroes have an intimate knowledge of the effects of violence. As such, they should have a special moral obligation not to inflict violence on others.

Telegram from Harry Van Arsdale to MLK While in Jaill

Monday, October 24, 1960
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Harry Van Asrdale, President of the New York City Central Labor Council, informs Dr. King that the organization has voted to demand the release of Dr. King and others from Fulton County Jail. He states that the arrest violates "basic constitutional rights" and that the Council fully supports the fight to end discrimination and segregation in the United States.

Telegram from Ted Aretha to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967
Birmingham, AL, New York (NY), Alabama (AL), New York, NY

Ted Aretha sends words of encouragement to Dr. King during his time in the Birmingham City Jail.

God is Light

Dr. King prepares a sermon entitled, "God is Light." He refers to I John 1:5 during his preparation.

MLK Draft Text Retrieved by T.D. Johnston

Alabama (AL), INDIA, Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), GERMANY, SOUTH AFRICA, Montgomery, AL, Jackson, MS

The document is a dedication from T. D. Johnston of Huntsville, Alabama to the King Center. Mr. Johnston acknowledges being on an Eastern Airline plane with Dr. King in 1961, where he noticed that Dr. King tossed a speech text that he found. He decided to hold on to the document for preservation and donated it to the King Center. Martin Luther King, III received the document on behalf of the King Center.

Letter from P. A. Riley to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967
Ohio (OH), New York, NY, New York (NY), VIETNAM

A critic writes Dr. King a carefully constructed letter to share her view on his Vietnam War stance. As a widow of a late Korean War veteran, she claims that Dr. King's position undermines "everything that our fighting men, down thru the long, long, years, have fought and died for." The widow questions Dr. King's combination of civil rights and peace movement issues, and asserts "patriotism is one of the factors free men live and prosper under!"

Letter from Norma Lineberger to MLK

Tuesday, December 17, 1963
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C.

Mrs. Lineberger encloses a financial contribution for Dr. King to use for his personal well-being. She states that the gift is in memory of the late President Kennedy with hopes that his death will result in a unified stride "toward the good life."