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"VIETNAM"

Letter from John Brooks to MLK

John Brooks affirms the importance of Dr. King's work and informs Dr. King of an enclosed contribution to the SCLC.

Letter from Mrs. Donald H. Hage to MLK

Friday, January 19, 1968
Colorado (CO), Washington, D.C.

Mrs. Hage praises Dr. King's work, particularly his use of peaceful means to accomplish his goals. She also requests information about how best to help at the local level in Colorado.

Letter from Dr. John Holton to William Marine Regarding the Price Project

Monday, October 2, 1967
Atlanta, GA

In this letter Dr. Holton, president of the Atlanta Medical Association, states his position on the Price Project. Dr. Holton asserts that he does not agree with the candidates were chosen for the proposal, and must oppose the project.

Letter from MLK to David Sutton

Thursday, December 16, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King regretfully informs Mr. Sutton of his inability to speak at Drexel Institute for the 1965-1966 calendar year. At the time of writing, Dr. King was engaged in non-violent grass roots efforts throughout the South to end racial discrimination. His commitment to community issues would oftentimes force him to refuse public speaking engagements, among other requests.

A Supplemental Appropriation for the Office of Economic Opportunity

Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

In this proposal, the Office of Economic Opportunity states that the Administration would like to fund the National Alliance of Businessmen out of the Office of Economic Opportunity appropriations. The Administration also doesn't wish to seek supplemental funds for special summer programs. These decisions could result in a reduction of funding in various programs like Head Start and Job Corps.

Statement Upon Return to Montgomery

New York, NY, Montgomery, AL

Dr. King reflects on his near death experience after Izola Ware Curry stabbed him with a letter opener at a book signing in New York City on September 20, 1958. Although Dr. King refers to Curry as a "deranged woman," he has "no bitterness towards her" and sees her actions only as a "reflection on the moral climate." Dr. King further states what he will remember most is the "vast outpouring of sympathy" that was received from all races and creeds.

Letter to Dr. Neil V. Sullivan from Robert L. Green

Thursday, April 27, 1967
Michigan (MI), Berkeley, CA

Robert Green expresses his appreciation for Dr. Neil Sullivan's chapter contribution in the book, "Education and the Urban Poor." Mr. Green is pleased when he discovers Dr. Sullivan has contributed a portion of the book profits to Dr. King and the SCLC. The book will be in demand for college level courses focusing on education, psychology and sociology.

Thank You Letter from MLK Regarding Albany Incarceration

Monday, August 20, 1962
Albany, GA

Dr. King thanks his supporters for sending him encouraging letters during his incarceration in Albany, Georgia.

Letter from MLK to Dwight Campbelll

Friday, September 11, 1964
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King declines an invitation from the Methodist Youth Fellowship to speak in Philadelphia.

Royalty Summary from J. Campe to MLK

Friday, November 4, 1966
New York, NY

This cable from Joan Daves to Dr. King details the earned value of British royalties and the number of copies sold for "Stride Towards Freedom" and "Strength to Love."

Royalties from "Why We Can't Wait"

Sunday, April 30, 1967
New York, NY

This document is a reference to the royalties earned from Dr.King's book "Why we Can't Wait", the Norwegian edition.

Letter from Carey B. Preston to MLK

Friday, August 28, 1964
Philadelphia, PA, Chicago, IL

Carey Preston of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, thanks Dr. King for being the public meeting speaker at their convention.

Birmingham Manifesto

Birmingham, AL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The Birmingham Manifesto was formulated as a testament to explain the reasons why efforts were being made to desegregate Birmingham. According to the Manifesto, broken promises were made by city and state officials, which led to plans of direct action.

Telegram from Theodore Brown to MLK

Tuesday, January 23, 1968
NIGERIA, New York, NY, New York (NY)

Mr. Brown confirms the departure date for the Nigeria Peace Mission with Dr. King.

Notecard Containing the Definition of Thinking

This notecard quotes Dr. Brightman's definition of thinking, taken from "An Intro to Philosophy".

Letter from Mrs. Bonnie Cohen to Ralph David Abernathy

Wednesday, May 1, 1968
Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI

Bonnie Cohen, a senior at Eastern Michigan University, writes to Rev. Abernathy requesting his thoughts on the problem of "crime in the streets."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. James Halsey

Wednesday, March 20, 1963
Connecticut (CT)

Dora McDonald sends, at Dr. King's request, a check to Dr. James Halsey.

Letter from John. O Behrens to MLK

Friday, February 18, 1966
Chicago, IL

Mr. Behrens welcomes Dr. King to the city of Chicago. In an effort to show his gratitude, Behrens offers Dr. King a subcription to "Community", a magazine published by Friendship House. He also requests an opportunity to interview with Dr. King.

Letter from Don Blaine to MLK

Thursday, August 26, 1965
Kansas (KS), Atlanta, GA

Don Blaine seeks advice from Dr. King concerning the idea of organizing a peace caravan that would travel throughout the United States. Blaine views this suggestion as a way to garner international support for peace.

Handwritten Notecard Regarding "Pelagianism"

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines "Pelagianism". This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from President Johnson to MLK on Assuming Presidency

Monday, December 2, 1963
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

President Johnson writes Dr. King thanking him for his sympathetic telegram as he assumes the Presidency and assures him that he will continue the fight for civil rights initiated by President Kennedy.

Letter from Pamela Buckler to MLK

Monday, September 26, 1966
North Carolina (NC)

Ms. Buckler writes Dr. King requesting SCLC literature on Negro politics for her sociology paper.

God (His Existence: Psalms)

Dr. King references the Old Testament biblical Book of Psalms regarding God's existence.

Telegram from MLK to Mrs. H. H. Hubbard

Friday, September 15, 1967
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

Dr. King sends his condolences to Mrs. H. H. Hubbard following the death of her husband. Dr. King also mentions the importance of Dr. Hubbard's contributions to the Montgomery bus boycott.

Telegram to MLK from A Phillip Randolph and Andrew Heiskell

Friday, December 22, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Randolph and Heiskell request Dr. King's presence at an Urban Coalition Steering Committee Meeting in Washington.

Letter from MLK to Aileen B. Armstrong

Wednesday, October 16, 1963
Berkeley, CA, California (CA), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Armstrong for her letter and contribution. He explains the difference her donation will make in the SCLC's efforts to integrate "the Negro into all aspects of American life."

Letter from Lily E. Sternlow to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968
SOUTH AFRICA, Atlanta, GA

With topics ranging from "The Poor Pay More for Less" to the featured article "Malawi's Anti-Christian Atrocities - A Shame on Africa," this edition of "Awake" magazine is forwarded by Lily Sternlow to Dr. King. After receiving word of Dr. King's travels to Africa, Sternlow brings attention to issues surrounding Christian witnesses in Malawi.

Letter from Herman E. Talmadge to MLK

Wednesday, April 28, 1965
Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Senator Herman E. Talmadge expresses his views on the poll tax with reference to the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Letter from R. Abraham to MLK

Saturday, September 20, 1958
New York, NY

R. Abraham sends this get-well letter to Dr. King wishing a full recovery during his stay at Harlem Hospital. Also enclosed is a gift in appreciation for Dr. King's work for humanity.

Telegram from Ms. Dora McDonald to A.J. Cervantes

Missouri (MO)

Ms. Dora McDonald responded to a telegram sent from St. Louis Mayor A. J. Cervantes, inviting Dr. King to participate in a conference entitled, "Tell It Like It Is." The conference, held in St. Louis, MO, was to feature civil rights leaders, mayors and other organizers. Ms. McDonald informed Mayor Cervantes that Dr. King was out of town and to look for a response from Dr. King at a later time.