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"VENEZUELA"

Letter from Berta Reller to MLK

Monday, October 23, 1967

Berta Reller writes a letter to Dr. King regarding an article she has enclosed. The letter discusses recent riots and that extremists from the left and right wings are motivating them. Reller believes that there should be more focus on education.

Telegram from John Dempsey to President John F. Kennedy

Monday, July 30, 1962

John Dempsey, Governor of Connecticut, telegrams President John F. Kennedy urging "the full force of the federal government be used to assure the personal safety of Dr. King and his associates who are asserting their rights as citizens."

Peace and Freedom Party Registration Drive

This document discusses the Peace and Freedom Party Registration Drive and the California Committee for the Peace and Freedom Party. The registration drive aims to place the Peace and Freedom Party on the 1968 California ballot with the purpose of opposing the Democratic and Republican presidential candidates. Also included is a partial list of the Peace and Freedom Party's endorsers, which includes 1962 Nobel Peace Prize recipient Linus Pauling.

Letter from Robert Kennedy to MLK

Wednesday, December 4, 1963

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy writes to Dr. King regarding a case of civil disobedience in Albany, Georgia. He discusses the boycotting of Carl Smith's supermarket due to Smith serving as a juror in the civil action case of Ware vs. Johnson.

Metropolitan Youth Commission of St. Louis

The following document recounts a three-year survey conducted by the Metropolitan Youth Commission in regards to the "Distribution of juvenile apprehensions by age, sex, and from the year 1960 to July 25, 1963."

Letter from Sevy Powell to MLK

Wednesday, March 27, 1968

evy Powell expresses her view that President Johnson has done more for Negroes than President Kennedy did and Robert Kennedy or Sen. Eugene McCarthy can do because of his ability to influence Congress.

Letter from Carmen Baptista to MLK

Monday, December 27, 1965

Carmen Baptista of Caracas, Venezuela writes Dr. King after reading his letter in the Saturday Review. She expresses her concern with the struggle for civil rights and since she is unable to make a monetary donation, she sends Dr. King a recording of a song she composed in honor of the freedom workers called "Coming Down the Road."

War and Pacifism

Dr. King examines War and Pacifism. He determines that absolute pacifism is not acceptable, but neither is war. He cites several different philosophies of pacifism and nonviolence set forth by such figures as Nels Ferre, John H. Hallowell, A. J. Muste and Mahatma Gandhi.

The Three Stages of Life

This documents contains notes on the three stages of life.

Letter from Karen Goldberg to MLK

Tuesday, December 3, 1963

Karen Goldberg, a twelve-year-old in a religious school, requests some biographical information about Dr. King for a group project.

Nobel Lecture by MLK

Friday, December 11, 1964

This is a copy of the Lecture given by Dr. King in Oslo, Norway upon his winning the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. He thanks the Norwegian Parliament for honoring him with this award. He speaks of the evils of racially injustice and the belief that "oppressed people cannot remain oppressed forever." He speaks of the need to peacefully come together in harmony as humanity because a peaceful world cannot be built based on a "negative path."

Letter from Arthur C. Walter to MLK

Monday, November 18, 1963

Arthur Walter, Assistant Pastor at Park United Presbyterian Church, writes Dr. King regarding a boycott that will deny some African American children Christmas gifts. Walter inquires about how his church can use some of their funds to provide gifts for the children that will be affected by the boycott.

What Are We Fighting For?

This outlines the sermon "What Are We Fighting For" into three components: the past, the present, and the future.

Condolence Letter Regarding Assassination of MLK

Monday, April 8, 1968

Anabella Anderson discusses the sadness that she feels over Dr. King's assassination. She says that she grieves for his family and the conditions that brought about Dr. King's death. Ashamed of her white skin, she blames the white race for social ills. Ms. Anderson wants to give of her self to non-whites in America and those under white domination in Africa. Though saddened, she is comforted by the words she heard at Dr. King's funeral and is hopeful that his legacy will live on.

Letter from Morton S. Grossman to MLK

Thursday, January 5, 1967

In this correspondence, Morton S. Grossman, expressed his joy, over Dr. King's New Year's card, and enclosed a check, in support of the Civil Rights Movement. In addition, Mr. Grossman requested a note, signed by Dr. King, to add to his autograph collection.

MLK Draft on Jackie Robinson and Hall of Fame

Wednesday, July 25, 1962

Dr. King highlights the achievements of Jackie Robinson in this article about Robinson's induction into baseball's Hall of Fame. Dr. King applauds Robinson for using his celebrity status for the Civil Rights Movement.

President Kennedy's Record

Friday, February 9, 1962

In this February 1962 column for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King acknowledges President Kennedy's appointment of Negroes and executive order ending employment discrimination. But he calls the President “cautious and defensive” in providing strong leadership in civil rights and criticizes him for not ordering an end to discrimination in federally-assisted housing.

Letter from Josephine Baker to MLK

Tuesday, November 26, 1963

Josephine Baker offers support and encouragement to Dr. King in the civil rights campaign and asserts "without unity there cannot be a solid victory."

Letter from Victor Seidel to MLK

Sunday, March 4, 1962

Victor M. Seidel requests a copy of Dr. King's lecture that was delivered at the University of Texas entitled "Civil Liberties and Social Action."

Letter from Chester S. Williams to MLK

Monday, May 1, 1967

Mr. Williams, a member of the executive committee of his local branch of the NAACP, expresses his displeasure at NAACP Executive Director Roy Wilkins attacking Dr. King's position on the Vietnam War.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding "Stride Toward Freedom"

Friday, May 15, 1964

In this letter from Joan Daves, Dr. King is informed that Ballantine Books has the pocket rights to "Stride Toward Freedom" but they did not do much with the title. Harper & Brothers then got the rights back.The letter closes by saying that Harper & Brothers would like Dr. King's approval so the deal can be cleared.

Letter from John A. McDermott to Chicago Daily News

Friday, June 30, 1967

John McDermott anticipates discrimination in housing and job opportunities as a result of a proposed federal project for a nuclear power plant in Illinois. Ideally, The Weston Project should create equal opportunities for both black and white Americans. McDermott expresses concern considering the current conditions of racial injustice that exists in Illinois.

What the Reformation Took Out

This note card lists the effects of the Reformation on Christian worship. Summarizing the consequences, Dr. King notes, "the intellectual element was overemphasized."

Letter from Thelma Larkin to MLK

Tuesday, February 15, 1966

Miss Larkin, a disgruntled landlord, expresses her concern for Dr. King's initiative against slum lords. She feels his war on slum lords is a bit misguided in that it takes responsibility and accountability away from those she calls slum tenants.

Address by MLK at the 30th Anniversary of District 65

Wednesday, October 23, 1963

This document, an address given by Dr. King on the 30th anniversary of District 65, includes handwritten notes. In the address, Dr. King talks about the importance of the Declaration of Independence and the Emancipation Proclamation to human rights.

Letter from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Friday, January 5, 1968

Roy Wilkins, of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa, wrote Dr. King to explain his increasing concern over the violence in Nigeria. Wilkins requests Dr. King's presence for a meeting with Nigerian Leaders to discuss the possibilities of ending the hostilities.

Letter from Dora McDonald to T. M. Benson

Wednesday, August 14, 1963

Dr. King's secretary responds to a request from Peak Publications to use a portion of Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail" in a tract. Ms. Dora explains to the company's representative that the letter will be published in an upcoming book, hence Dr. King has made a commitment to the publisher to refuse permission for reprints.

Schools' Mobile TV Unit Tapes Dr. King's Speech

Tuesday, December 1, 1964

This news article highlights Darien, Connecticut for the use of their mobile television unit to tape Dr. King's speech. The mobile studio was moved to Stamford High School, where students filmed the speech. Ten other schools in the area were able to see Dr. King speak with the help of this new technology.

Thank You Letter From MLK to Mrs. Helen N. Ceder

Thursday, December 21, 1967

Dr. King expresses appreciation for Mrs. Helen Ceder's contribution to Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He acknowledges that her support assists with many important projects such as voter registration and eradication of ghettos in the North.

Letters from Irvine I. Turner to MLK

Tuesday, April 17, 1962

Irvine I. Turner requests, in three different letters, Dr. King provide an endorsement for reelection to the Newark Municipal Council.