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"VENEZUELA"

Telegram to Dr. King Regarding "Camp In At the United States Senate"

Friday, October 27, 1967

In this letter, Lucious President share his opinion about Dr. King's actions at the Senate. "A massive camp in at the United States Senate is contrary to God's teaching. You will not have God on your side."

Letter from MLK to Gleason Jackson Regarding Negro National Flag

Thursday, July 13, 1967

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Mr. Jackson for designing a flag promoting unity among black people. Although Dr. Kings feels a flag such as this has implications of separatism, he encourages Mr. Jackson to continue publicizing his ideas regarding black unity.

Fort Valley State College Vesper Program

Sunday, October 23, 1955

This program outlines the events of a service held at Fort Valley State College in Georgia and notes Dr. King as the keynote speaker.

Telegram from George Woods to MLK

Friday, July 30, 1965

George Woods, Vice President of the Philadelphia Branch of the NAACP, telegrams Dr. King regarding his upcoming visit. Woods asks about a rumor being spread that Dr. King would not make the appearance because King was allegedly being hosted by the Quaker Fellowship House. The trip was called off and then rescheduled.

Letter from Jacques Muhlethaler to MLK

Thursday, May 25, 1967

Jacques Muhlethaler writes Dr. King requesting that he accept a committee position with EIP. The EIP is an organization seeking to contribute to world peace by instituting an interdisciplinary curriculum in classrooms domestically and abroad.

Esquire Magazine: The Red Chinese American Negro

This segment of Esquire Magazine features an article discussing the militant activities of Robert F. Williams. Williams had returned home from military service and headed the Monroe, North Carolina branch of the NAACP. Frustrated by the inactivity of local legislation to reform segregation and aggravated by Klu Klux Klan attacks, Williams adopted more violent methodologies. The article also emphasizes his association with Chinese leader Mao Tse-tung and discusses Tse-tung's solidarity with racial goodwill policies.

Letter from A. White to MLK

A. White reprimands the public use of fire hydrants and urges Dr. King to educate his "people" to avoid such actions.

A Tough Mind and A Tender Heart

Sunday, August 30, 1959

An early foreshadowing of his nonviolent philosophy, Dr. King advises Negroes of a particular course of action they should adhere to in order to properly equip themselves to combat racial injustice. Seeking to avoid both complacency and hostility, he challenges those who desire self-satisfaction, as well as those who seek to pacify their oppressors, by proposing the idea of one having both a tough mind and a tender heart.

Memorandum to the SCLC Staff

Monday, April 1, 1968

In a memorandum sent to the SCLC staff, just days before Dr. King's assassination, Tom Offenburger informs members of a meeting Dr. King had with his advisers. The main focus of the meeting was the march in Memphis which turned violent, as well as the future of the Poor People's Campaign. In spite of the violence, there remains plans to go to Washington and correct the economic racism the US faces.

Draft Letter from MLK to Gregory Coffin

Dr. King expresses his appreciation to Mr. Coffin for sending newspaper clippings and a proposal regarding schools in Darien, Connecticut. He also states that he is hopeful that Mr. Coffin's program will act as a contributing factor in the effort to end segregation.

Letter from Morton S. Grossman to MLK

Thursday, January 5, 1967

In this correspondence, Morton S. Grossman, expressed his joy, over Dr. King's New Year's card, and enclosed a check, in support of the Civil Rights Movement. In addition, Mr. Grossman requested a note, signed by Dr. King, to add to his autograph collection.

Letter from the Mayor of Jerusalem to MLK

Friday, February 3, 1967

Teddy Kollek, the Mayor of Jerusalem, Israel, expresses appreciation and support for Dr. King's planned pilgrimage to the Holy Land. At the time of this letter, West Jerusalem was Israeli territory and East Jerusalem part of Jordan. During the 1967 Six-Day War, Israeli occupied and annexed East Jerusalem, but that annexation is not recognized by the international community.

Chicago Tribune: Man's Struggle for Freedom

Sunday, June 25, 1967

Clarence Seidenspinner writes this review for the Chicago Tribune regarding Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" His evaluation centers around Dr. King's progression from using nonviolence as strategy in Montgomery, to his focus on international affairs. He further explains Dr. King's first uneasy experience with the Black Power slogan and its effects.

Letter from Abram Eisenman to MLK

This was sent to Dr. King from Abram Eisenman, who is running for President of the United States in 1968. He asks for Dr. King's support in running for president and presents his case on why he should be president.

Letter to MLK from Irving Zipin

Friday, June 9, 1967

Mr. Zipin writes to offer his support for Dr. King's views on the Vietnam War.

Barth

Dr. King writes about Karl Barth's theology regarding revelation.

Contradiction and the Power of God

Dr. King reflects on man's understanding of God and salvation.

Letter from MLK to Beatrice Rosselll

Wednesday, September 23, 1964

Dr. King takes an opportunity to express gratitude for Beatrice Rossell's support to the civil rights movement. He addresses her inquiry regarding his activities with the Highlander Folk School and possible Communist ties. Rossell received a picture of Dr. King at Highlander and the caption addressed him as a Communist.

Excerpt from The Drum Major Instinct

This passage quotes one of Dr. King's acclaimed sermons delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia. He defines the desire to lead as "the Drum Major instinct." Seeing himself as a Drum Major for justice, peace, and righteousness, Dr. King posits what should be said at his funeral.

Letter from Geraldine Jones to MLK

In this letter, Geraldine Jones tells Dr. King about the heightened racial tension in Chicago, and her fear that Chicago will soon have a riot like Los Angeles.

Letter from MLK to Michelle Feinberg

Wednesday, February 13, 1963

Dr. King responds to Michelle Feinberg, a special education student from Gary, Indiana. In the letter, Dr. King tells Michelle her letter meant a lot to him and she is fortunate to have a special teacher.

Operation Breadbasket Advises Tastee Bread Company on Negro Economic Relations

The Cincinnati and Midwestern Division of SCLC's Operation Breadbasket provides Tastee Bread Company with several recommendations concerning employment practices and involvement in the Negro community.

Letter from S. O. Adebo to Theodore Brown

Tuesday, March 28, 1967

S. O. Adebo, a permanent representative of the Permanent Mission of Nigeria to the United Nations, requests a meeting with Mr. Brown and his colleagues. Mr. Brown is the Executive Director of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa. This letter references the Nigeria-Biafra situation, which Dr. King was deeply concerned about.

A Memorandum Regarding the Cooperative Housing and Rehabilitation Program

In this memorandum from James P. Twomey, executive director of the Community Renewal Foundation Inc., writes to Mr. Donald Jordan of the Federal Housing Administration in regards to the building of cooperative housing and rehabilitation centers. The memorandum address certain issues such as the mortgage for the homes as well as the architects and attorneys

The American Dream

The is a draft outline of Dr. King's "The American Dream" speech delivered at many colleges, universities and churches throughout the country. Dr. King urges Americans to abandon practices of discrimination in order to protect the American dream and the proliferation of the nation.

Anglicanism

This note card briefly compares Anglicanism to Roman Catholicism and Calvinism.

Dr. King Sermon Rough Draft - "Man Incurably Religious"

The document, shown here, is a rough draft of sermon notes, prepared by Dr. King, under the title "Man Incurably Religious." The exact timeframe, of this sermon draft, is unknown. Dr. King, in this draft, puts the spotlight on examples such as a baby's attachment to a mother, a flower's direction toward the sun and the flight pattern of a pigeon. He used a quotation of St. Augustine that said, "We come forth from God and we shall be homesick until we return to him."

Telegram from President Johnson to MLK

Thursday, June 23, 1966

President Lyndon B. Johnson writes to Dr. King sympathizing with his concern over the incidents that occurred in Philadelphia, Mississippi. King was continuing the March Against Fear of James Meredith, who was shot by a sniper on June 6. A rally in Philadelphia commemorating the murder two years earlier of three civil rights activists was angrily attacked by a white mob. Homes of blacks were later sprayed with gunfire.

Worship Must Have Three Things

Dr. King states that "worship" must have three things: unity, movement, and rhythm.

The Trinity

Dr. King analyzes Peter Abelard's argument on the interpretation of the Trinity as three attributes of one substance.