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"VENEZUELA"

Handwritten Notecard regarding "Rule of Faith"

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on the "Rule of Faith." This is an example of the many notecards Dr.King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Telegram from Nelson Rockefeller on Church Bombing

Monday, September 16, 1963

New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller comments on the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombings and expresses his sympathy to the families of the four children who were killed.

Letter from Bob Strain to MLK

Monday, December 25, 1961

Bob Strain writes Dr. King after reading an article in Newsweek entitled "Albany Movement." He apologizes for the ignorant behavior of fellow whites and expresses his desire to be a part of the movement. He also conveys his admiration for Dr. King and his work.

A Blind Woman's Request for MLK

Juilia Lockheart, a blind 75 year old woman, requests aid from Dr. King. Many people envisioned Dr. King to be the savior of their time; they would contact him with unrelated requests outside of the non-violent movement in hopes that he could be the remedy to their current issue.

Review on "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community" 1967

Saturday, April 15, 1967

The Virginia Kirkus Review wrote this descriptive review on Dr. King's final book, Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community? The context of the review shows differences between the messages of Dr. King's earlier works and Where Do We Go From Here. Dr. King's earlier publications focused on the work of gaining decent treatment and basic civil rights for black Americans. However, this book heavily challenged the status quo in America.

Letter From Chas D. Wherry to MLK

Thursday, January 18, 1968

Chas Wherry advises Dr. King to consult with Dr. H. H. Brookins about accumulating more funds for the March on Washington. Wherry also inquires about Dr. King sending a letter to the Los Angeles Times regarding Mrs. Bain's newly appointed position.

Letter from the Inmates of Cook County Jail to MLK

Thursday, December 7, 1967

The inmates of Cook County Jail request Dr. King's help in fighting certain injustices in the criminal system. The writer informs Dr. King that he may contact Ms. Juanita Whiltfield for more details.

Letter from H. Carl Moultrie to MLK

Saturday, January 25, 1964

H. Carl Moultrie invites Dr. King or another representative to participate in a panel discussion as a part of the Omega Psi Phi Fraternity's Annual Grand Conclave. Moultrie also provides brief information about the fraternity.

Letter from Hubert H. Humphrey to Mr. Alan F. Westin

Monday, March 21, 1966

Vice President Hubert Humphrey congratulates Professor Alan Westin for the creation of the Center for Research and Education in American Liberties.

MLK - Notes on "Highest Value"

These handwritten notes of Dr. King's focus on the concept of "highest value" in its various iterations.

Thank you letter from George R. Metcalf to MLK

Thursday, October 5, 1967

Mr. Metcalf, president of the National Committee Against Discrimination in Housing, thanks Dr. King for joining the Advisory Council. Mr. Metcalf expresses his belief that Dr. King's participation on the council "will greatly strengthen the National Committee in its efforts to attain equal opportunity in housing."

Letter from Bayard Rustin to MLK

Tuesday, May 18, 1965

Mr. Rustin informs Dr. King that he has reached out to the American Jewish Committee and has included the appropriate person to recognize prior to the delivery of his speech.

WBTV Editorial: "King's Bedfellows"

Monday, February 19, 1968

The content of this document suggested that Dr. King break ties with leaders Stokley Carmichael and H. Rap Brown, due to their stance on violence as a weapon. At the bottom of this document, is an invitation for Dr. King, H. Rap Brown and Stokley Carmichael to respond.

Letter from Mary Blount to MLK

Sunday, March 6, 1966

Mrs. Blount urges Dr. King to come to Philadelphia. She acknowledges Dr. King as a "man of God" and herself as a "sinner saved by grace."

Letter from S. Keith Graham to MLK

Thursday, January 13, 1966

Skyline High School invites Dr. King to attend their annual dance sponsored by the Associated Men of Skyline. The dance is entitled, "The Southern Queen," and may include additional prominent leaders such as President Lyndon B. Johnson.

Letter from Ronald Segal to MLK

Sunday, October 10, 1965

Mr. Segal expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's willingness to sponsor the International Conference on South Africa. He also requests that Dr. King prepare a short paper to deliver at the Conference.

Letter from Christopher Pearce to MLK

Monday, February 6, 1967

Mr. Pearce, a young English filmmaker, desiring to produce a documentary on Dr. King, requests permission to follow him about Washington, D. C. during his upcoming visit.

Letter from Clayton Yates to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967

Clayton R. Yates informs Dr. King of the Kappa Boule Meeting held on Morehouse College campus with James P. Brawley and Benjamin E. Mays.

Letter from MLK to Senator Thomas H. Kuchel Regarding Passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Senator Thomas H. Kuchel's support in passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Schleiermacher and the Bible

Dr. King references a quote from Friedrich Schleiermacher regarding the relationship between religion and sacred texts.

Letter by William Castleman on Northern Marches

Thursday, August 11, 1966

William Castleman, Executive Director for the American Federation of Senior Citizens, commends Dr. King on the effectiveness of the marches in the North and says they should not be abandoned. At the time this letter was written, Dr. King had led numerous marches in Chicago and other urban cities focusing on equal housing. The correspondence references the Founding Fathers and the Constitutional rights that allow peaceful solution of the nation's problems.

Letter from Pastor Sutton-Branch to SCLC

Monday, April 8, 1968

In this letter Pastor Sutton-Branch, of the Commonwealth Community Church in Chicago, sends condolences and donations to the SCLC, while urging the recipient to extend sympathy to Mrs. King, for the loss of her husband.

Telegram from MLK to Mattie Tillman

Dr. King expresses his condolences to Mattie Tillman for the death of her husband. Dr. King states that he will always be remembered for his influence in the Atlanta University community.

Memorandum from Lillie Hunter to MLK

Lillie Hunter sends Dr. King a memorandum that breaks down the office conditions and decorum as well as recommendations for the SCLC.

Sin

Dr. King offers two possible interpretations of Psalms 53:1.

Operation Breadbasket: A Statement by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Tuesday, December 12, 1967

Dr. King announces an agreement made with Pick-n-Pay Supermarkets that will open numerous jobs for the Negro community. The

Letter from Norue Crickson to MLK

Tuesday, March 9, 1965

Twelve-year-old Norue Crickson commends Dr. King for his civil rights efforts. He expresses that from now on he will offer his "prayers for this cause."

MLK's Newsweek Statement

Monday, February 26, 1962

Dr. King issues a statement on the defeat of a federal agency that would have allowed an African American to obtain a cabinet position within the national government.

Letter from MLK to Dr. A.S. Markham

Thursday, January 21, 1965

Dr. King apologetically informs Dr. Markham that he will be unable to attend an event held in his honor to receive the Brotherhood Society of Beth Shalom 1965 award.

Letter from Archie Crouch to MLK

Thursday, May 4, 1967

Archie R. Crouch, of the Office for Communications, sends a personal letter to Dr. King using the United Presbyterian Church letterhead. He expresses his support for Dr. King's leadership against the Vietnam War and states that he meets many people that stand in opposition to the war. Crouch encloses recent issues of the publications New and Motive, which highlight the anti-war efforts taking place in the Presbyterian Church.