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"UZBEKISTAN"

Letter from MLK to Senator J. Glenn Bealll

Monday, June 22, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King thanks Senator J. Glenn Beall for supporting the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Report on The Chicago Plan by The Chicago League of Negro Voters

Thursday, January 1, 1959
Chicago, IL

This outline of the initiative of The Chicago League of Negro Voters titled "The Chicago Plan," was constructed in a effort to bring together the Negro Voters in the city of Chicago in 1959.

Letter from Mr. John W. Hall to MLK

Friday, September 30, 1966
California (CA), Atlanta, GA

Mr. Hall of Pomona, California shows his support for Dr. King and the SCLC through an ongoing monetary contribution.

Letter from Daniel B. Brewster to MLK

Monday, July 20, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Senator Brewster thanks Dr. King for his kind letter and encloses a copy of the speech he delivered on the Senate floor before the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was passed.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Nina C. Brown

Wednesday, January 13, 1965
Pennsylvania (PA)

Dora McDonald provides Nina C. Brown with details about Dr. King's upcoming appearance at Pennsylvania State University.

Invitation for MLK to Speak at Bryn Mawr College

Tuesday, January 4, 1966
Pennsylvania (PA)

The class of 1966 from Bryn Mawr College invite Dr. King to be the baccalaureate speaker for their service on Sunday May 29th. They remind Dr. King that he was scheduled to speak previously but other engagements prevented him from doing so.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding Article Fee

Thursday, November 19, 1964
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Ms. Daves encloses Dr. King's fee for his article in the "Saturday Evening Post" and discusses issues concerning future reprints of this particular work.

Letter from W. B. Blix to MLK

Monday, February 26, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Wisconsin (WI)

W. B. Blix writes to Dr. King to express his support of the Civil Rights Movement. However, Blix also informs Dr. King that he has lost his support because of Dr. King's preemptive decision to commit civil disobedience if the Poor People's March on Washington is unsuccessful.

Letter from Eugene Jackson to MLK

Sunday, August 13, 1967
Tennessee (TN), Atlanta, GA

Eugene Jackson expresses his amazement with Dr. King's superb performance during his interview on "Meet the Press."

Letter from Mrs. Emma L. Jones to MLK

Wednesday, February 3, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Richmond, VA

Emma L. Jones writes Dr. King on behalf of Third Street Bethel A. M. E. Church requesting permission to use his name and picture on their key ring project.

Letter to Rev. MLK, Sr. from Arlen Fuhlendorf

Monday, April 8, 1968
Texas (TX)

Mrs. Arlen Fuhlendorkr writes to Rev. King Sr., expressing deep sympathy for the death of Dr. King. She also wanted to convey to Rev. King that he should be proud of the great work his son did for humanity.

Letter from Activist Carl Brannin to MLK

Sunday, January 6, 1963
Texas (TX), Dallas, TX

Social reformer and journalist Carl Brannin commends Dr. King's recent speech in Dallas. Brannin also discusses the importance of the Negro community voting in all elections and reports his experience as a poll tax deputy. He expresses frustration at recent elections that would have had different outcomes if the Negro vote had been strong and united.

Telegram from F. M. Horton to MLK

Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Oslo, Norway, SWITZERLAND

F. M. Horton relays Norwegian ambassador True Davis' congratulations to Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Testament by Martin A. Watkins

Wednesday, June 14, 1967
New Jersey (NJ), Birmingham, AL, Nashville, TN, Philadelphia, PA, North Carolina (NC), SPAIN, Berlin, Germany, JAPAN, Texas (TX), Memphis, TN

Martin Watkins covers an array of topics in his expression of poems entitled "Testament." With great admiration, Watkins presents this book of poetry to Dr. King. In the preface, Watkins explains his purpose of publishing these poems during the Korean War. He further elaborates on his admiration of the Negro, his preoccupation with death, and the identification with Christ.

Letter from Frank Meranda to President Johnson

Monday, October 17, 1966
Washington, D.C.

Frank Meranda, chairman of the Boston chapter of CORE, writes President Johnson to point out that job tests for the federal government result in discrimination against minorities.

Letter from Frank Emspak to MLK

Wednesday, November 3, 1965
Wisconsin (WI), VIETNAM, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Frank Emspak, of the National Coordinating Committee to End the War in Vietnam, invites Dr. King to a convention to speak about his antiwar and pacifism sentiments.

Telegram from MLK to Dr. Samuel Proctor

Friday, December 29, 1967
Norfolk, VA

In this telegram to Dr. Samuel Proctor and Family, Dr. King expresses his grief upon hearing of the death of Dr. Proctor's mother.

Letter from Morris A. Morse to Rev. Abernathy

Sunday, April 28, 1968
Minnesota (MN), Atlanta, GA

Morris Morse sends his condolences regarding the death of Dr. King. Mr. Morse further explains his opposition of the idea of building a two million dollar church in Dr. King's honor, because he believes that the reverend would not want such a memorial when so many people are in need.

National Conference on Christian Education Brochure

Indiana (IN)

Dr. King was a featured guest speaker of the National Conference on Christian Education. This pamphlet lists the events of the program occurring during August 19-22 of 1958.

Telegram from St. James Baptist Church to MLK

Tuesday, September 23, 1958
Detroit, MI, New York (NY)

Rev. W.C. Barnett, pastor of St. James Baptist Church, sent this telegram expressing well wishes, from his congregation, towards Dr. King.

Insight Broward: Bullets, Backflips & Baby-Talk

Florida (FL)

Moreland Smith forwarded a copy of Insight Broward Magazine for Dr. King to view. In this collection of articles, Jim Corvell expresses his disapproval of Alcee Hastings, a local NAACP lawyer, who was a candidate for the House of Representatives. Coryell heatedly describes his efforts to thwart what he called "the [N]egro racist's political plans.

Letter from Reverend James A. Pike to MLK

Friday, September 9, 1966
California (CA), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), London, England

Reverend James A. Pike, a famous American Episcopal Bishop, writes to Dr. King regarding an appearance at the University of Cambridge's Great St. Mary's.

Letter from Paul P. Martin to MLK

Monday, March 26, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA)

The Erie Branch of the NAACP invites Dr. King to be the principal speaker at its Freedom Rally.

Letter from Mildred Lynch to MLK

Saturday, November 25, 1967
CANADA, SOUTH AFRICA, Atlanta, GA

Secretary of the Canadian Anti-Apartheid Committee Mrs. Mildred Lynch inquires about Dr. King's availability to join group members for an upcoming 1968 public meeting to be held in Toronto.

Ebenezer Baptist Church. Dr. King with Daughter Bernice (Bonnie). Atlanta, 1967

Atlanta, GA

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

VFW Post 2156 to MLK

Friday, September 30, 1966
Missouri (MO)

The members of George Washington Carver Post VFW Post 2156 voice their support for Dr. King, along with a donation.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Fred Koury

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

In this letter, Dora McDonald tells Fred Koury that Dr. King cannot attend the Annual Spring Conference of the United Federation of Teachers due to prior commitments.

Telegram from Tina McDonald to MLK

Hartford, CT

Tina McDonald wishes Dr. King a happy birthday and is pleased to send God's blessings of courage and strength.

Letter from Roy Wilkins to the Honorable Dean Rusk

Tuesday, October 11, 1966
Washington, D.C., ZAMBIA, New York, NY

In this letter, Roy Wikins extends an invitation to Sec. of State, Dean Rusk, to attend a meeting of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa.

Letter from Mrs. Presley Layer to MLK

Tuesday, April 2, 1968
Florida (FL)

As a member of the Urban League and other civic organizations, Mrs. Layer expresses her concerns about the conduct of marches verses a more militant tactic. Mrs. Layer asserts that we live in a violent nation and is concerned that violent pacifist will become uncontrollable. She concludes with informing Dr. King she is an admirer and long supporter of the SCLC.