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MLK Schedule

Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., New York (NY), New York, NY, Cleveland, OH, Texas (TX), Ohio (OH), Chicago, IL, Boston, MA

This schedule of Dr. King's lists the dates and places he will be for the month of September and October.

Letter from MLK to Melvin Grussing Regarding a Contribution

Monday, February 26, 1968
Indiana (IN)

Dr. King writes to express gratitude for the generous contribution of $126 to the SCLC. He conveys that such support enables SCLC to continue programs to complete the task of voter registration in the South.

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, October 9, 1964
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Joan Daves sends Dr. King a royalty statement for "Stride Toward Freedom" and "Strength To Love."

Letter from Philip Harnden to MLK

Friday, February 16, 1968
Detroit, MI, Illinois (IL)

After reading Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait," Philip Harnden, a sophomore at Wheaton College, writes Dr. King expressing his newly changed insight on the Negro struggle. Mr. Harnden inquires about Dr. King's nonviolent approach and the black community beginning to abandon nonviolence by adopting more aggressive means to achieve their goals.

Letter from MLK to Murray Thomson

Friday, February 11, 1966
CANADA

Dr. King regretfully informs Murray Thomson that he cannot accept his invitation to Toronto due to his prior commitments for the month of June.

God

Dr. King records a portion of Carl Jung's argument that God is a function of the unconscious.

Letter from Carolyn B. Russell to MLK

Sunday, May 29, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Carolyn B. Russell is a high school student in support of Dr. King and informs him about different aspects of her life. As a result of living in her single mother's household, Carolyn desires employment and to continue her education.

Letter from Stanley Slota to MLK

Arizona (AZ)

Stanley Slota writes Dr. King to acknowledge how proud he is of him and expresses his desire for more people to give back to the poor.

People to People: A Choice and a Promise

Saturday, November 21, 1964
Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), Virginia (VA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King addresses the idea that American people of all races have a choice to make this nation a great society.

Letter from Imogene Cashmore to President Johnson

Wednesday, August 16, 1967
Washington, D.C., CONGO / ZAIRE, Wisconsin (WI), SOUTH AFRICA

Imogene Cashmore responds to Senator Dodd's recent statement in Congress about Moise Tshombe, a Congo politician who had recently been jailed on charges of treason. Cashmore condemns Senators Robert and Ted Kennedy for not trying to help Tshombe, questioning why there has been no negative response to the current government of Congo, which Cashmore charges is rampant with "mass murder and violation of civil rights."

Italian Weekly Requests MLK Views on Gandhi

Tuesday, January 3, 1967
INDIA, ITALY, Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

The Italian weekly magazine, Mondo Domani, plans to publish a lengthy article on Gandhi. The editors wish to include Dr. King's response to several questions on nonviolence, outlined in this letter from their United States Representative Enzo Viscusi.

Letter from Professor St. Clair Drake to MLK Regarding the Economic State of Negro People

California (CA)

In this letter, Standford University Professor of Sociology, St. Clair Drake, discusses his interest in launching a co-operative movement to aid the Negro people. Professor St. Clair Drake also mentions an enclosed newspaper.

Getting Caught in the Negative

Dr. King references the Book of Acts regarding his sermon "Getting Caught in the Negative." King asserts, "Don't get bogged down in the negative. Christianity must forever offer to the world a dynamic positive."

Letter from Al Fann to MLK About Hunter College Program

Wednesday, March 6, 1968
New York, NY, CANADA

In this letter A1 Fann, director of A1 Fann & Co., gives an overview of the company and it's founding while offering up the services of the company under the direction of Dr. King.

Letter from Benjamin Mays to Editors of the New York Times

Monday, August 20, 1962
New York, NY

In this letter, Mays addresses the editors of the New York Times about an article on equal employment opportunity. Mays states that he was not consulted by the article's author. As a result, he was misquoted. Mays uses the remainder of the article to clarify his position on equal employment programs.

Letter from F. N. Campbell to Ralph David Abernathy

Washington, D.C.

In this letter F. N. Campbell commends Abernathy for his dignified and effective handling of the first phase of the People's March in Washington, DC. It is his hope to utilize the climate of response following Dr. King's assassination. To this end, he proposes the establishment of a foundation in memory of Dr. King.

Actual Occasions

Dr. King quotes philosopher Alfred North Whitehead's "Religion in the Making." He interprets the phases in events and how such events are perceived.

Telegram of Support from Richard J. Hughes to MLK

New Jersey (NJ)

In this telegram, Hughes writes to Dr. King informing him due to important public commitments he will not be able to join Dr. King. Hughes states, "I join millions of other American in wishing you well in your nobel work.

Letter from Edwin Fenton to MLK about permission to use Marchi on Washington speech

Tuesday, June 13, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA)

Edward Fenton, Co-Director, Social Studies Curriculum Development Center at Carnegie Institute of Technology writes to request permission to duplicate some excerpts from Dr.King's speech in Washington during the summer of 1963 without fee. Operating under a grant from the United States Office of Education, the Center is developing new courses of study and writing materials to teach social studies inductively to able students in grades nine through twelve.

The Second Annual Bishop Lichtenberger Human Rights Award Dinner

Chicago, IL

The Chicago Chapter of The Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity invites Dr. King to the Second Annual Bishop Lichtenberger Human Rights Award Dinner. This award is being accepted by Mrs. Philip B. Daniels on behalf of her late son, Jonathan Myrick Daniels.

Letter to Mrs. King from Katherine Hardy

Wednesday, December 1, 1965
Alabama (AL)

Katherine Hardy, a mother of five, faces eviction and desperately writes to Mrs. King for any aid she can provide.

Letter to MLK from Violet Calvert

Thursday, July 1, 1965
Washington (WA)

Violet Calvert expresses to Dr. King that she has little money but she uses letters to fight for equality. She shows Dr. King a copy of one of her published letters.

Suggestions for Survival During Period of Prolonged Civil Disorder

Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI)

This document contains a list of tips and suggested supplies for survival during a period of civil disorder, including specific food items and tools. The document recommends stockpiling enough supplies to survive for at least one month without needing to leave your home.

Letter from James L. Hicklin, III to MLK

Thursday, February 14, 1963
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY

James Lewis Hicklin, III of The Freedom For All Foundation, inquires if Dr. King will serve on the organization's National Board of Governors.

Memo from Tom Offenburger to MLK and Others Regarding Article

Monday, January 8, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Albany, GA, Birmingham, AL

Tom Offenburger sends Dr. King a copy of a newspaper clipping from the Atlanta Constitution in which the writer Bruce Galphin expresses his sentiments regarding the often violent occurrences at nonviolent protests.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

VIETNAM

Dr. King received this letter from an individual who urges that both poverty and the Vietnam War should be ended by helping Americans and building up communities, and then sending peaceful volunteers to South Vietnam to do the same. The author, who has several family members in the service, chooses not to sign their name, fearing retribution, and states that they wish to broadcast this message around the world.

Letter to J. Avery from MLK

Friday, May 13, 1966
New York (NY)

Dr. King expresses embarrassment because of his late response to a telegram requesting his presence and explains that the mistake is due to an overworked, understaffed office. The tone of the letter conveys the personal concern King feels for each of the numerous individuals who seek his participation in events around the country.

Letter from Richard L. Doerschuk to MLK

Thursday, October 22, 1964
Washington, D.C., New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Deputy director of the United States Information Agency, Richard Doerschuk requests that Dr. King participate in a television program to be broadcast in Africa on the topic of civil rights.

Paint

Noting the vastness of the sky and "heavens," Dr. King comments on the Earth, stars, and surrounding planets.

The Mastery of Fear

This outline explains the direction of Dr. King's sermon entitled "The Mastery of Fear." In it, Dr. King explores the challenges and necessity of confronting fear.