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"UNITED STATES OF AMERICA"

Letter to Men of Morehouse from Morehouse President Benjamin E. Mays

Morehouse President Benjamin E. Mays discusses the events during Centennial Founders Week at Morehouse College for those who were not in attendance. He also informs the Men of Morehouse of the upcoming commencement ceremony.

Annihilationism

Dr. King defines annihilationism as a belief regarding the death of the wicked.

Press Release from Edward Lamb

Friday, October 13, 1967
Ohio (OH), VIETNAM

This press release from Edward Lamb, an Ohio delegate to the 1964 Democratic National Convention, expresses his opposition to the Vietnam War and to President Lyndon Johnson, who had pledged as a candidate not to escalate the war.

Objects and the Nature of Thought

Dr. King notates the various explanations of "objects" and "the nature of thought."

Letter from Bette Zugerman to Rev. Abernathy, SCLC

Saturday, April 27, 1968
Pennsylvania (PA)

Ms. Zugerman writes Reverend Abernathy to introduce an enclosed document which she suggests is the "one and only non-violent answer to alleviate the suffering of all people."

Letter from Wyatt T. Walker to Ella

Wednesday, July 22, 1959
Atlanta, GA

Reverend Wyatt Tee Walker provides his appraisal regarding an earlier proposal by Spelman College to create an Institute on Nonviolence. Walker addresses the letter to Ella describing several categories of interest pertaining to the organization of this event.

Bold Design for a New South

Saturday, March 30, 1963
Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, Mississippi (MS), North Carolina (NC)

Dr. King notes that civil rights has been replaced as the "Number One" domestic issue, dwarfed by the Cuban missile crisis, trade legislation and tax reform. He attributes this to public acceptance of tokenism as well as an overly cautious administration. While acknowledging that the administration has made greater efforts on civil rights than previous ones, Dr. King says the progress is constricted and confined.

Letter from Larry T. Wimmer to MLK

Friday, December 2, 1966
Utah (UT), Atlanta, GA, Tennessee (TN)

Larry T. Wimmer, Assistant Professor at Brigham Young University, writes Dr. King seeking information regarding his views on communism and the Civil Rights Movement. He also asks if it is possible to obtain any films regarding the Civil Rights Movement and Dr. King's leadership.

Lawyer Ejected By House Inquiry; Seven Walk Out

Thursday, August 18, 1966
Washington, D.C., New York (NY)

New York lawyer Arthur Kinoy was ejected from the hearing room of the House Committee on Un-American Activities in Washington following a heated legal argument. Seven other lawyers withdrew from the proceedings following Mr. Kinoy's ejection.

Memorandum from Theodore Brown to MLK and Others

Wednesday, May 17, 1967
New York, NY, South Africa, Washington, D.C.

Theodore Brown informs Dr. King and other civil rights leaders of a previous letter to President Johnson regarding United States-Africa relations.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Arvella Gray

Monday, June 3, 1963
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Dora McDonald acknowledges receipt of items sent by Arvella Gray. She ensures Mr. Gray that Dr. King will be made aware of the gifts upon his return from Birmingham.

Letter from Gloria Fraction to Andrew Young

Tuesday, July 5, 1966
Chicago, IL

Gloria Fraction tells Andrew Young that the National Merit Scholarship Corporation has invited Dr. King and Mrs. King to attend an honorary dinner for the most outstanding Negro students.

Letter from the Knox's Church to MLK

Friday, January 24, 1964
CANADA, Atlanta, GA

The Knox's Church of Canada expresses their excitement to see Dr. King's image in Time Magazine for 'Man of the Year.' The author asserts that after all John F. Kennedy may have not died "in vain." Robert A. Jackson expounds on the societal issues in Canada and how they experience some aspects of segregation in cities. Mr. Jackson invites Dr. King to the Knox church upon his availability.

Letter from James W. Thetford to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967
VIETNAM, Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, New York (NY), New York, NY, JAPAN

A 75-year old man expresses his discontent with the Vietnam War and his belief that America's economic and social problems are inextricably linked to the ongoing military occupation in Vietnam.

Letter from Joseph T. Beaver to MLK

Wednesday, October 1, 1958
MEXICO, Cincinnati, OH, Ohio (OH), San Francisco, CA, LIBERIA, Oslo, Norway, New York (NY), Illinois (IL)

Joseph Beaver, Jr. sends his sympathy to Dr. King following the attempt on Dr. King's life. He had originally included a biography of Wendell Phillips Dabney.

Telegram from MLK to Robert M. Drevs

Chicago, IL

Dr. King applauds Robert M. Drevs and the Catholic Interracial Council for selecting Bill Berry to receive the John F. Kennedy award.

Letter from MLK to Paul Madsen

Friday, November 29, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King informs Reverend Paul O. Madsen that he does not have availability to work for the Home Missions Societies of the American Baptist Convention because he is very busy with the civil rights struggle.

MLK Memorial Service Program in Seattle, Washington

Sunday, April 7, 1968
Washington (WA)

Three days after the death of Dr. King this memorial service, conducted by Reverend Theodore Kennedy, took place at the First Unitarian Universalist Church of Seattle.

Letter to MLK from G. Houghton

Wednesday, April 3, 1968
Atlanta, GA

Mr. Houghton writes to Dr. King with a plan for SABON (Saving and Building Organization of, by, and for the Negroes).

Letter from Clarence Jones to MLK

Friday, May 15, 1964
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

Clarence Jones writes Dr. King requesting commentary concerning "The World March Towards Human Rights: Luncheon on May 28, 1964."

Memorandum to the SCLC Staff

Monday, April 1, 1968
Memphis, TN, Washington, D.C.

In a memorandum sent to the SCLC staff, just days before Dr. King's assassination, Tom Offenburger informs members of a meeting Dr. King had with his advisers. The main focus of the meeting was the march in Memphis which turned violent, as well as the future of the Poor People's Campaign. In spite of the violence, there remains plans to go to Washington and correct the economic racism the US faces.

Letter from James H. MacDonald to MLK

Friday, June 16, 1967
Missouri (MO)

James MacDonald asks Dr. King to send a statement regarding his personal struggles to assist with the sermon MacDonald will deliver to his congregation. MacDonald also seeks advice on how to integrate his church.

The Burning Truth in the South

New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL), Wisconsin (WI), Montgomery, AL

This article reprinted from "The Progressive," details the discriminatory conditions experienced by blacks in the South and urges support in the nonviolent struggle for freedom and equality.

Letter From PFC Harold Mac Kenzie To MLK

Saturday, March 30, 1968
San Francisco, CA, THAILAND, South Carolina (SC)

In this letter to Dr. King, serviceman Harold Mac Kenzie explains how he is interested in the welfare of Black people and would like to know how he can contribute to the movement.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Ernest J. Foster

Saturday, July 25, 1964
Los Angeles, CA, Albany, GA, St. Augustine, FL

Dr. King thanks Dr. Ernest Foster for his financial contribution to the SCLC. He informs Dr. Foster of the distribution of the proceeds from a previous reception and discusses the significance of supporters to the movement. Dr. King also encloses a copy of his recent book, "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Senator Hubert H. Humphrey to MLK

Tuesday, July 7, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Minnesota Senator Hubert Humphrey thanks Dr. King for his praise regarding Humphrey's role in the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Humphrey would become Vice President later that year.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. S.C. Njonjo

Tuesday, December 1, 1964
SWEDEN, KENYA

Dora McDonald responds to Mr. Njonjo's invitation for Dr. King to attend Kenya's Independence Celebration. Ms. McDonald informs Mr. Njonjo that Dr. King is happy to accept the invitation.

Royalty Statement-MLK

Sunday, April 30, 1967
New York (NY)

Dr. King receives a royalty statement for the sale of the Norwegian edition of "Stength to Love." The Norwegian edition was published by De Unge Forlag and sold 6963 copies. The total for the statement amounts to $1139.15.

Letter from Silvio O. Conte to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965
Washington, D.C.

Representative Silvio Conte informs Dr. King that he received Dr. King's letter pertaining to the petition for home-rule of Washington D.C. Conte asserts that he is a strong advocate for home-rule of the district.

National Council of Churches Conference of Negro Leaders Opening Remarks

Saturday, January 30, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY, California (CA), Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, Ohio (OH), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Washington, D.C.

A. Philip Randolph makes remarks at the Conference of Negro Leaders National Council of Churches about the future of the Civil Rights Movement. Randolph expresses the importance of continuing the fight of social justice through civil rights, economics, housing and poverty.