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Dr. King records a definition of semi-Arianism.

Annual Report of The President: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Wednesday, August 16, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Ohio (OH), Chicago, IL, Jackson, MS, North Carolina (NC), EGYPT, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

In the SCLC's Annual Presidential Report, Dr. King chronicles a decade of organization's activities to eliminate segregation. The report was delivered at the Tenth Anniversary Convention of the SCLC.

Letter from Louis Braun to MLK

Thursday, July 29, 1965
New York, NY, New York (NY)

The National Chairman of the Campus Americans for Democratic Action reminds Dr. King of an earlier letter in which Dr. King was invited to serve on the organization's advisory board. Braun also lists individuals who have agreed to serve on the board.

SCLC Annual Board Meeting Agenda

Florida (FL)

This agenda details a 1966 SCLC annual board meeting in Miami, Florida. On April 12, a review of the White House Conference on Civil Rights took place. On April 13, Andrew Young presented the Program Analysis and Future Projection.

Letter from Abdul Razak Ahmad to MLK

Friday, August 26, 1966

Abdul Razak Ahmad requests a message of support from Dr. King for an upcoming event. Ahmad is the president of the University of Singapore's Socialist Club. This letter praises Dr. King for his leadership and also discusses racial problems in Singapore.

Invitation from J.G. Kennelly to MLK

Wednesday, April 24, 1963

J.G. Kennelly invites Dr. King to address the Christian Culture Forum during their 1963-1964 season in Hamilton, Canada.

Address by Jackie Robinson at SCLC Freedom Dinner

Tuesday, September 25, 1962
Albany, GA, Birmingham, AL, New York (NY), New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), ITALY, CANADA

Guest speaker Jackie Robinson discusses his personal struggles with adopting the philosophy of nonviolence, race relations and the far-reaching efforts of the SCLC.


Through quoting an unknown Christian, Dr. King calls for modern Christians to accept a personal challenge that will one day enable historians to declare that it was Christianity that held the world together.

Letter from Sarah Harvey to MLK

Saturday, December 9, 1961

An "English Quaker" thanks Dr. King for his letter and references an impending donation. The contributor informs Dr. King that she intends on communicating with her bank to find out if she can transfer the whole sum and promises to have definite news soon.

Letter from a Lithuanian American to MLK


In this letter to Dr. King, a Lithuanian immigrant to the United States writes that he agrees with the campaign for Negro rights and believes that all U.S. citizens should be treated equally.

African American Unity in Atlanta, Georgia

Atlanta, GA

The author of this document discusses why it is imperative for African Americans to not only stand in unity against the injustices of society, but to also be informed about the issues in which they strive to prevail against. Information about school integration, housing discrimination, and taxation is offered in the conclusion of the document.

Letter from Frances L. Lucas to MLK

Monday, July 23, 1962
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, New York (NY), Albany, GA

Frances L. Lucas writes Dr. King concerning the actions taken to end segregation in a community in Albany, Georgia. Lucas also apologizes for not responding to Dr. Kings formal letter.

Letter from MLK to Congressman Ogden R. Reid

Friday, February 19, 1965
Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King informs Congressman Reid (R-New York) of the positive impact he left on Negro citizens during his visit to Selma, Alabama.

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to Dora McDonald

Sunday, November 6, 1966
Pennsylvania (PA), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Mr. Shaefer, Executive Secretary of the Hadley Executive Committee, requests information from Ms. McDonald regarding Dr. King's scheduled lecture in Kennett Square, Pennsylvania.

Letter from William A. Rutherford to Mr. T. M. Alexander, Jr.

Tuesday, March 5, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), South Africa

Mr. Rutherford writes Mr. Alexander explaining that members of the SCLC were not aware of the purchase of stock made on behalf of the organization. He explains to Mr. Alexander that the organization is in complaint of and will protest Mr. Alexander's actions.

Crozer Theological Seminary: The Bulletin

Saturday, July 1, 1950
North Carolina (NC), Pittsburgh, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Delaware (DE), New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

The Bulletin, a newsletter sent to Dr. King from the Crozer Theological Seminary, includes information on the 1950 commencement. This is this institution from which Dr. King himself will graduate from in 1951.

Elmer Evans Advocates for Black Power

Sunday, July 16, 1967
New Jersey (NJ), Los Angeles, CA, London, England, SPAIN

"A white caucasian" advocates for black power, claiming that it is synonymous with sovereign power. Responding to a televised discussion on the subject of black power, Elmer Evans aims to challenge what he felt was inaccurately presented on the show.

Letter of Invite From Coval Bryant MacDonald to MLK

Thursday, March 24, 1966
Chicago, IL

In this letter, Minister Coval Bryant MacDonald invites Dr. King to speak with the minsters and priest of The Greater Oak Ministerial Association.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Katherine McBride

Tuesday, February 22, 1966
Pennsylvania (PA)

Dora McDonald responds to the President of Bryn Mawr College expressing that Dr. King has committed to being the key note speaker for the upcoming graduation. Following the letter is the official commencement invitation.

The Drum Major Instinct Sermon Outline

Monday, February 5, 1968

Dr. King outlines on scraps of paper his great sermon based on Mark 10:37. Everyone wants to be first, to get attention, he says, starting with our first cry as a baby. Adults want to do good and be praised. If the drum major instinct is not harnessed, the personality is distorted and we become boastful, gossip, put others down. On a societal level, this leads to exclusive social groups, racial prejudice and war. King states that Jesus’ answer is to dedicate this great force to worthy ends – goodness, moral excellence, generosity, kindness and service. .

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An anonymous writer questions Dr. King about blacks committing brutal acts against whites.

Letter from Alice McBee to MLK

Wednesday, September 7, 1966
New Jersey (NJ)

Alice McBee expresses her admiration for Dr. King and dedicates two of her poems to the King family.

Cooperative/Noble Competition


Dr. King writes a sermon on the topic "Cooperative Competition." King utilizes the biblical text deriving from Luke chapter 22 verse 24, which expresses how Jesus views competition. According to the text, Jesus thinks that competition is good as long as an individual competes with humility and serving others.

To Fulfill These Rights

Friday, June 1, 2012

The White House Conference on Civil Rights printed this program in preparation for their June 1966 conference. The theme of this agenda is entitled To Fulfill These Rights.

Letter from Cornell's L. Paul Jaquith to MLK

Monday, November 7, 1960
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New Jersey (NJ)

L. Paul Jaquith writes Dr. King regarding his upcoming visit to Cornell University. The student body seeks to discuss issues relating to the inequality of opportunities for Negroes in the United States.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ralph Kates

Wednesday, October 4, 1967
Philadelphia, PA

Dora McDonald writes Ralph Kates on behalf of Dr. King accepting their invitation to visit St. Joseph College.

Letter from T. Jansma of the Dutch Baptist Union to MLK

Friday, September 10, 1965
NETHERLANDS, Selma, AL, Alabama (AL)

T. Jansma, General Secretary of the Dutch Baptist Union, asks Dr. King to deliver a speech to Baptists in Amsterdam while he is in the city to receive an honorary degree.

A Realistic Look at Race Relations

Thursday, May 17, 1956
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King gives the three views one can take regarding the state of race relations: optimism, pessimism, and realistic. Dr. King argues for a realistic stance because America has accomplished much in race relations, but still has a long way to go. He further explains that he thinks segregation is in its last days.

Letter to MLK from Paul Kennedy

Saturday, March 16, 1968
California (CA), Washington, D.C.

Paul Kennedy writes Dr. King to state that since Robert Kennedy announced his bid for the presidency, he believes hat an appreciative, token march on Washington would be more effective than a force march this year.

Public Affairs Memorandum

Monday, December 27, 1965
Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL, Pittsburgh, PA, Connecticut (CT), Ohio (OH), Detroit, MI, Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), Boston, MA, New Jersey (NJ)

Vice President Humphrey is quoted as saying, "This is a pragmatic program - what's best is what works", in describing the Office of Economic Opportunity program. This public affairs memorandum details the efforts of the organization as it pertains to the anti-poverty movement.