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Letter from Alice Brainerd to MLK

Saturday, August 19, 1967
Denver, CO, Colorado (CO)

Ms. Brainerd criticizes the methods of Dr. King, asserting that "civil disobedience and non-cooperation" are not the best approach to take towards justice.

Letter from Alice Mary Hilton and Kathryn Anne Hilton Hayward to MLK

Wednesday, April 12, 1967

Kathryn, a young American girl, writes a letter to Dr. King expressing her sympathy for a girl in the Vietnam War. Kathryn sends twelve cents to help the girl in the war smile. Kathryn's mother also expresses her concern about the war.

Telegram from Rodney Clurman to MLK

Monday, February 6, 1967
INDIA, New York (NY), New York, NY

Rodney Clurman, of the World Food and Population Crisis Committee, asks Dr. King if he can access his mailing list or circulate material that Clurman provides in an effort to end the famine in India.

Letter to Lucille Withers from MLK's Secretary

Monday, December 3, 1962
New York, NY

Miss Lucille Withers, of Harper and Row Publishing, was the addressee of this correspondence from Miss Dora McDonald. Miss McDonald informed Miss Withers that she enclosed Dr. King's sermon titled "Transformed Nonconformist." The sermon was apart of a compilation of other sermons given by Dr. King, which were formed into his second book "Strength to Love."

Letter from MLK to a Former Supporter

Thursday, July 20, 1967

This is an edited copy of Dr. King's response to someone withdrawing support due to his position on the Vietnam War. King's detailed rewrites show efforts to avoid further misunderstandings about his position. He applies nonviolent philosophies to both the civil rights and peace movements, however, does not attempt to link the two. Rather than asking for Negroes to be exempt from the draft as a special privilege, he believes Negroes have an intimate knowledge of the effects of violence. As such, they should have a special moral obligation not to inflict violence on others.

Telegram From MLK to Dr. L. Frances Griffin and Dr. Milton Reid

Richmond, VA, Virginia (VA)

Dr. King offers this inspirational message to Drs. Griffin and Reid for their outstanding leadership in the advancement of public education.

Letter of Thanks from MLK to Professor & Mrs. De Branges

Monday, February 27, 1967
Indiana (IN)

In this letter, Dr. King expressed appreciation to Professor and Mrs. Louis De Branges for a generous contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

MLK Explains Nonviolent Resistance

Morehouse College (Atlanta, GA), Howard University, Atlanta, GA, INDIA, UNITED KINGDOM, MEXICO, Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA)

Dr. King explores the underpinnings of nonviolent resistance by analyzing Thoreau's "On Civil Disobedience," the teachings of Gandhi and the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

Promotional Article for Why We Can't Wait

Birmingham, AL

This Harper released publication contains a preview of the religious books to be published in the summer and fall of 1964. Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait" is featured with the byline "The 'Man of the Year' writes the 'Book of the Year'."

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Monday, July 31, 1967

This letter, signed "A Malaysian Citizen," expresses the author's hatred of African Americans. In addition to urging for their genocide, the author states that African Americans ought to be grateful that they are no longer enslaved. The author tasks the recipients of this letter, including Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, and President Johnson, to circulate it widely in order to express what he claims are the Malaysian views of the 20th century.

Barth and Brunner

Dr. King notes the views of Swiss theologians Karl Barth and Emil Brunner on God, making reference to Soren Kierkegaard (SK).

Cover to Cover

Saturday, June 24, 1967
New Jersey (NJ)

The Trentonian newspaper, under the subheading "Cover to Cover," published a brief review of Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community." This review examines Dr. King's perspective on racism, poverty and militarism. "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community" was Dr. King's first publication, since he received the Nobel Peace Prize. The book was published and released in 1967.

Letter to Dr. Ralph Abernathy from Frank Binswanger

Wednesday, April 24, 1968
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

Frank G. Binswanger of the Philadelphia Civic Center, assures a recommitment to the cause for which Dr. King served and extends condolences to Dr. Abernathy regarding the loss of Dr. King.

Peace of Mind or Soul

Dr. King quotes French physiologist Dr. Charles Richet.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Arvella Gray

Monday, June 3, 1963
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Dora McDonald acknowledges receipt of items sent by Arvella Gray. She ensures Mr. Gray that Dr. King will be made aware of the gifts upon his return from Birmingham.

Crozer Theological Seminary Telethon

Pennsylvania (PA), Chester, PA

Crozer Theological Seminary, Dr. Kings alma mater, issues a solicitation for contributions to its almnus. The letter states that alumni receiving the letter were not able to be reached during the "Crozer Alumni Telethon." Dr. King attended the religious institution from 1948-1951 after receiving his Bachelor of Arts in Sociology from Morehouse College.

Letter from Eugene Exman to MLK

Wednesday, November 15, 1961
New York, NY, Montgomery, AL

Mr. Eugene Exman's, expresses disappointment in Dr. King for not having received his manuscript for a forthcoming book of sermons, and urges him to expedite the manuscript.

It's Hard to Be a Christian

Dr. King outlines his sermon entitled "It's Hard to Be a Christian." King asserts that in order for one to be a fully committed Christian he or she must subordinate their ego and prioritize their concern for God's kingdom.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. D.A. McGregor

Monday, September 25, 1961
New Jersey (NJ)

Dr. King expresses delight in Mrs. D.A. McGregor's request for a copy of his sermon "Paul's Letter to American Christians." However, since he doesn't have a complete manuscript of the sermon at the time he receives the letter, Dr. King mentions that it will be published in his upcoming book of sermons. The book of sermons would eventually be named "Strength to Love."

Letter from MLK to Dr. Eisendrath

Friday, September 29, 1967

In this letter, Dr. King writes to Dr. Eisendrath to clarify SCLC's view on anti-Semitism. Dr. King explains that neither he nor his organization support any resolution calling for black separatism or the condemnation of Israel. He identifies oil as the primary issue in the region and maintains the only way to relieve the tensions between the Middle East and the United States is through peaceful solutions.


Dr. King writes about the role of religion as an ideal and as a unifying force.

Letter From Mitchell Sviridoff to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967
New York (NY), Kentucky (KY), New York, NY

Mitchell Sviridoff responds to a telegram from Dr. King, in which Dr. King states his support of the Queens Clinical Society's proposal for a neighborhood health service center.

Letter from C. L. Evans to MLK

Thursday, September 7, 1967
Richmond, VA

C. L. Evans is giving a $100 contribution on behalf of the Baptist Allied Headquarters, to Dr. King for his work and organization.

Fund Raiser Event for the SCLC

Connecticut (CT)

Mrs. Richard Gile expresses her admiration to Dr. King for his work with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. The La Fleurs Garden Club wishes to sponsor a Benefit Freedom Tea event to raise money for the SCLC.

Schleiermacher (The Religious Man)

Dr. King quotes Schleiermacher's views on man's identification with Religion.

Letter from MLK to the United Presbyterian Church

Wednesday, June 14, 1967
New York, NY

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Rev. Edward Williams for the support of the United Presbyterian Church Commission on Religion and Race. He encloses a receipt for $5000 for partial payment of a grant for the salary of Hosea Williams. Williams was National Program Director for SCLC from 1967 to 1969 and was arrested more than 125 times for his civil rights activism.

Letter from L. Alexander Harper and Charles E. Cobb to Edith M. Lerrigo

Monday, October 24, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY

Edith Lerrigo writes with concern regarding the support of the "Crisis and Commitment" call by several civil rights leaders. Lerrigo endorses Dr. King's decision to refuse his signatory on the document supporting the call, stating that this act "should have been sufficient to give pause to groups like the YWCA before jumping on the moderate bandwagon."

Science (Its Limitations)

Dr. King notes that while man’s actions as an animal are biological (science), his actions as a person are spiritual and require a spiritual cause, suggesting there is a Creator God.

Statement of Wisdom

Dr. King references a quote from Aldous Huxley's "Ends and Means" regarding wisdom.

Letter from Sam Aluko to MLK

Wednesday, November 16, 1966
NIGERIA, Geneva, Switzerland

Sam Aluko writes Dr. King requesting him to contribute to the National Relief Fund, which assists displaced people in Nigeria.