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"UNITED STATES OF AMERICA"

The Negro Heritage Library

New York (NY), Birmingham, AL, Pennsylvania (PA), California (CA), BURUNDI, CAMEROON, CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC, CHAD, CONGO / ZAIRE, ETHIOPIA, GABON, GAMBIA, GHANA, GUINEA, Co'te D'IVOIRE / IVORY COAST, KENYA, LIBERIA, MALAWI, MALI, NIGER, NIGERIA, RWANDA, SENEGAL, SIERRA LEONE, TOGO, UGANDA, ZAMBIA

The Negro Heritage Library sought to make the Negro community aware of the cultural "black-out" that was due to the inadequacies within the nations history books.The president of the library, Noel N. Marder, focused the energies and resources from the Educational Heritage. As the most respected spokesman for the Negro of his time, there is a section focused solely on Dr. King's work.

Letter from Mrs. Elsie Walker to the SCLF

Monday, April 15, 1968
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

In this letter, Mrs. Elsie Walker mentions the enclosure of $50 given in memory of Dr. King. She also commits her Church's Service Guild to making annual pilgrimages to Dr. King's burial site in order to pay homage to "our Leader."

Letter from George Johnson to MLK

Tuesday, August 15, 1967
Missouri (MO)

George Johnson offers donating the services of his advertising agency to Dr. King as support for the Viet Nam [sic] war referendum in Missouri.

Letter from David J. Walker to MLK

Wednesday, January 6, 1965
Washington (WA), Atlanta, GA

David Walker, Chairman of the Speakers Committee for Toronto Junior Board of Trade writes Dr. King inviting him to speak at their Tuesday night dinner meeting. Walker continues with his own personal adulation on the Reverend receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Marion Dockhorn to Dr. and Mrs. King

Monday, April 16, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA), Geneva, Switzerland, SWITZERLAND

Marion Dockhorn invites Dr. and Mrs. King to attend the 5th Annual Bucks County World Peace Fair. Dockhorn believes that Dr. King's attendance will boost support for the civil rights movement by providing a place to "spread [the] message."

Preview of the "Dream" at Detroit March

Sunday, June 23, 1963
Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA)

Two months before the famous "I Have a Dream" speech at the March on Washington, King used many of the same words, rhetorical techniques, and themes. King expresses gratitude and inspiration and warns against hatred and separatism at what he thinks is the largest US demonstration to date, a march in Detroit June 23, 1963. The legacy of slavery and segregation induced a false sense of inferiority in Negroes.

Unitarian Universalist Statement of Consensus on Racial Injustice

Friday, May 20, 1966
Florida (FL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The Fifth General Assembly of the Unitarian Universalist Association listed several laws adopted by the association. Some of the laws incorporate civil rights, demonstrations, voting rights, equality, civil disobedience, and discrimination in employment and housing.

Operation Breadbasket Seminar

Chicago, IL

This brochure explains the economic development program "Operation Breadbasket." It consists of Negro and white clergymen of all faiths who are working to build a solid economic base among Negro people.

Eulogy for the Four Girls Who Were Murdered in the Church in Birmingham

Sunday, September 15, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King eulogizes the girls killed in the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church as "martyred heroines." He asserts that their deaths will serve a greater purpose: they will shed new light on Birmingham and the civil rights struggle.

Telegram from Dr. Roland Smith to MLK

Friday, June 2, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Dr. Roland Smith congratulates Dr. King on being honored with a Doctor of Divinity Degree from Morehouse College.

Letter from Thein Wah to MLK

Thursday, April 20, 1967
Texas (TX), Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, San Francisco, CA

Thein Wah expresses appreciation to Dr. King for his efforts in leading peace marches in New York, New York and San Francisco, California.

Letter from Dr. Lionel Newsom to Georgia Council on Human Relations Members

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Albany, GA

In the aftermath of the failure in attacking segregation in Albany, Georgia, the Chairman of the Georgia Council on Human Relations issues an appeal to its members to help support their continued fight. Dr. Lionel outlines the organization's past accomplishments and encourages members to learn from their mistakes in Albany to yield better results in the future.

Letter from Mrs. Willie Mae White to SCLC

Tuesday, December 5, 1967
Georgia (GA)

Mrs. Willie Mae White requests help from SCLC. She explains that she has fifteen children and would like to provide Christmas dinner and gifts, but does not have the financial means to do so. As a poor family in Scottsdale, Georgia, her family struggles, living without many basic necessities. Mrs. White also appeals to the members of SCLC, imploring them to send any available household ware, such as curtains, sheets, clothes, and kitchen utensils.

Christianity

Dr. King references Emil Brunner's argument on Christianity.

Letter from Richard L. Doerschuk to MLK

Thursday, October 22, 1964
Washington, D.C., New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Deputy director of the United States Information Agency, Richard Doerschuk requests that Dr. King participate in a television program to be broadcast in Africa on the topic of civil rights.

Letter from G. Cacciatore to Mr. Ivan Cameron

New York (NY)

In this letter, the Chief of Foreign Operation from the United States Department of State, responds to Ivan C. Cameron recent letter rearding voting in foreign political elections by United States citizens.

Draft of the Position Paper on Community Re-Creation

Saturday, April 1, 1967
New York, NY

This document drafts a set of intentions aimed at improving communities in America and uplifting individuals out of poverty. Proposed fundamental goals of achieving this include, a secure and adequate income, a proportionate share of decision making power, and access to the full range of human services.

Thank you letter to MLK from Major

Tennessee (TN)

Major thanks Dr. King for a good meeting and some great plans. He apologizes for his tardiness due to a delay in Washington.

Telegram from Mrs. King to David Rogers

Tuesday, January 14, 1969
Brooklyn, NY, New York (NY)

Mrs. King sends Mr. Rogers her appreciation for his effort in turning Dr. King's birthday into a federal holiday.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding Schedule with Publisher

Monday, May 4, 1964
New York, NY

Joan Daves provides details for the Monday, June 8th schedule that Dr. King's publisher would like to set up. The day starts off with the Today Show and ends with a cocktail party.

Statement from MLK Regarding Albany Movement

Wednesday, August 1, 1962
Albany, GA, Little Rock, AR

While serving a forty-five day sentence alongside Ralph D. Abernathy, Dr. King releases a statement expressing his appreciation for President Kennedy's support of the Albany Movement.

Telegram from James A. Dombrowski to Lindsay Almond Jr.

Richmond, VA

James A. Dombrowski urges J. Lindsay Almond to take a stand against segregation in the city of Lynchburg. This urgency emerged as a result of the jailing of six students who sitting-in at a local diner.

Royalty Summary for MLK from J. Campe

Tuesday, December 6, 1966
New York, NY

This royalty statement, from J.Campe, details Dr. King's sales and earnings from the French edition of "The Strength to Love", during the given time period.

Revelation as a Way of Knowing

Dr. King quotes and discusses Henry Nelson Wieman’s view of revelation and knowledge as described in “The Source of Human Good.” He used this quote in his doctoral dissertation, “A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman.”

Letter from Jimmie Barnett to MLK

Wednesday, March 9, 1966
Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., Illinois (IL)

A Negro owner of "so-called slum property" takes offense at Dr. King's stance on the subject. He argues that the owners of the properties are primarily Negroes who are not at fault. Dr. King undertook an extensive "End to Slums" campaign in Chicago in 1966 under the sponsorship of the SCLC and various community organizations.

Letter from Dan Aldridge to MLK

Monday, December 23, 1963
Atlanta, GA

Dan A. Aldridge, President of the Foundation Life Insurance Company, recalls a previous visit to Dr. King's home. Aldridge requests an appointment with Dr. King to discuss several important business matters.

Letter from Philip Harnden to MLK

Friday, February 16, 1968
Detroit, MI, Illinois (IL)

After reading Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait," Philip Harnden, a sophomore at Wheaton College, writes Dr. King expressing his newly changed insight on the Negro struggle. Mr. Harnden inquires about Dr. King's nonviolent approach and the black community beginning to abandon nonviolence by adopting more aggressive means to achieve their goals.

Sin

ISRAEL

Dr. King paraphrases the teachings of Amos about sin. Dr. King writes that Amos condemns Israel for the sins of bribery, oppression of the poor by the rich, sexual immorality and the "self-indulgent use of what has been wrung from the helpless."

Letter from Henry S. Huntington Expressing Concerned About Vietnam

Saturday, February 17, 1968
New York, NY

Huntington expresses deep concern regarding the Vietnam War. Huntington believes that humor and ridicule is a weapon against the war that is being used too little. He urges Dr. King and his supporters to each send a message to the president, and also write a letter to the local paper asking peace-lovers to state a message ridiculing President Johnson. In conclusion, Huntington hopes to gain other peace organizations to join in the Ridicule For Johnson Movement.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK

Tuesday, June 21, 1966
Washington, D.C.

Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey informs Dr. King of scheduling complications that will delay his response to Dr. King's request to address the SCLC.