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Letter from Eunice Johnson to Coretta Scott King

Monday, October 12, 1959

Eunice Johnson, an African woman born in America but now living in Nigeria, writes Mrs. King in hopes of being able to meet her during her visit to America. She hopes that they can discuss Dr. King's nonviolent campaign.

King's Way Hurts Rights Movement

Washington, D.C., Massachusetts (MA), Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Mr. White, author of this article, argues that the political fallout from Dr. King's stance on America's involvement in Vietnam hinders the goals of the Civil Rights Movement.

SCLC's People to People Tour

Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL)

The SCLC held their Alabama "People to People Tour" from December 5-8, 1962. This itinerary lists the SCLC staff that participated in addition to the locations of their meetings.

Letter from Telly H. Miller to MLK

Tuesday, November 15, 1966
West Virginia (WV)

Telly H. Miller, a graduate of the Morehouse School of Religion of the Interdenominational Theological Center and pastor in a West Virginia church, invites Dr. King to their Centennial. Pastor Miller requests that Dr. King deliver the Centennial sermon and explains that his coming will be a "great help" to the community.

To the Negroes of America


Robert Welch compares the American Negro Population to Negro populations around the world in regards to ownership of various consumer items. He asserts that Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, Bayard Rustin and Walter Reuther are shameless liars working in league with communists.

Letter from Hubert Reaves to MLK

Tuesday, March 12, 1968
Michigan (MI)

As an inmate in Jackson, Michigan, Hubert Reaves writes Dr. King to express his interest in the SCLC, and inform him of his future education in ministry at the Detroit Bible College. Mr. Reaves also includes a letter to Mr. Goodall inquiring about his inmate account and the sending of his letters.

Note Cards on God

Dr. King's writes on the possibility of finding God from the First Book of Chronicles.


Dr. King paraphrases Paul Tillich's view on the "self world polarity." Being a self, Dr. King writes, means being "both subject and object." This subject matter later appeared in Dr. King's dissertation "A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman."


Dr. King references two quotations on a note card titled "Man."

Social Ethics

Dr. King writes notes on social ethics from the Book of Nahum.

Letter from Ms. Anne Braden to MLK

Tuesday, February 13, 1968
Louisville, KY, Atlanta, GA

Ms. Braden, staff member of the SCEF, writes Dr. King regarding fellow staff member, Joe Mulloy, who was planning to refuse induction into the US Army. In light of a recent SCLC member making a similar decision, Ms. Braden requests support from Dr. King.


Dr. King references French social commentator Montesquieu regarding his ideas on history. King quotes, "He attempts to show how civilization has been modified by the action of the external world."

Letter from Sture Stiernlof to MLK

Tuesday, September 19, 1967
SWEDEN, Atlanta, GA

Arbetet magazine's foreign editor, Sture Stiernlof, requests an interview with Dr. King for a "series of articles about the negro movement" that will be published in Sweden's most popular magazine, "Vi," as well as in Arbetet. Additionally, Stiernlof will use the materials for a book.

MLK's Letter Addressing Poverty

Cleveland, OH

Dr. King addresses poverty, unemployment and other issues relevant to Americans and the mission of the SCLC before requesting funds to counter these issues.

Letter from W. David Angus to MLK

Friday, September 20, 1963

W. David Angus, Secretary of the Canadian Club of Montreal, extends an invitation to Dr. King to speak at an upcoming luncheon. He concludes by offering to cover any expenses that Dr. King may accumulate if he were to accept the invitation.

Letter from John A. McDermott Copied to Al Raby and MLK

Thursday, July 13, 1967

John A. McDermott, Executive Director of the Catholic Interracial Council, writes to Al Raby and Dr. King. Mr. McDermott describes the Council's involvement with the Chicago Freedom Movement. Mr. McDermott also expresses his appreciation for Mr. Raby and Dr. King's support in the fight for fair housing legislation in Chicago. McDermott goes on to describe the Movement struggle with the controversial Atomic Energy Commission project in Weston, Illinois.

Letter from MLK to Premier Lyndon Pindling

Friday, January 19, 1968

Dr. King encourages Premier Pindling of the Bahamas to accept an invitation to address the Atlanta Press Club. Dr. King assures Premier Pindling that the invitation is a great opportunity to speak with leading journalists from all over the United States.

Letter from Edmund W. Gordon to MLK

Wednesday, September 27, 1967
New York, NY, Massachusetts (MA), Chicago, IL

Edmund W. Gordon, Professor and Chairman of the Department of Educational Psychology and Guidance at Yeshiva University, invites Dr. King to serve on the Dr. W.E.B. DuBois memorial committee. The committee proposes a memorial park to honor Dr. DuBois in his hometown of Great Barrington, Massachusetts.

Letter from Nancy Keppy to MLK

Wednesday, January 31, 1962
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Iowa (IA)

Nancy Keppy, a high school student from Alabama, asks Dr. King to share his thoughts on integration and segregation.

Letter from Angie Elizabeth Shelton to MLK

Mrs. Shelton expresses her gratitude to Dr. King for renewing her faith. After reading one of Dr. King's books, she states that she felt herself beginning to believe. Mrs. Shelton has decided to buy and study "Civil Disobedience" thanks to Dr. King.


Dr. King writes on the topic of religion, stating that the people living in the 18th century regarded religion as "the source of both political tyranny and social conflict."


Dr. King records a quote on mystery from Robert Flint's "The Philosophy of History."

God (Isaiah)

Here Dr. King references Isaiah, Chapter 44 in discussing monotheism and the "utter folly of idol worship."

Letter from Rev. Max F. Daskam to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1963
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA

The Unitarian Church of Germantown requests the return of Dr. King's presence for their Pulpit Schedule of the current year. Years have passed since Dr. King has visited and the church "would rejoice" if he could provide a date.

Letter from Concerned Citizen to MLK

Tuesday, March 12, 1968
California (CA)

A citizen writes Dr. King to express their disagreement and distaste for his work within the Civil Rights Movement. The citizen believes that Dr. King's work promotes more hatred and violence in the nation.

Letter from Richard V. Moore to MLK

Tuesday, June 12, 1962
Florida (FL)

Mr. Richard Moore invites Dr. King to speak at the Baccalaureate Commencement of Bethune-Cookman College in Florida.

Letter from Charles A. Halleck to MLK

Thursday, December 31, 1964
Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

Charles A. Halleck expresses gratitude for Dr. King's letter outlining his reasons for opposing the seating of the five congressmen for the state of Mississippi.

Letter from Andrew Young to Dr. and Mrs. Peretz

Wednesday, November 1, 1967
Massachusetts (MA), Cambridge, MA, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Cleveland, OH, Ohio (OH)

Andrew Young thanks Dr. and Mrs. Peretz for their hospitality during a recent concert. He also explains that the concert, which had been designed as a fundraiser for the SCLC, did not meet financial projections.

Biography of MLK

Boston, MA, Atlanta, GA, Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C., NORWAY

Margaret B. Young details the events and accomplishments of Dr. King's life.

Letter from Milton A. Reid to Senator Leroy Johnson

Thursday, October 10, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Virginia (VA)

Milton A. Reid, a candidate for State Senate, invites Georgia Senator Leroy Johnson to a banquet at Virginia State College. The event will benefit the campaign expenses and feature guest speaker Wyatt Tee Walker, Dr. King's assistant.