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"UNITED KINGDOM"

Letter from L. H. Horace Perera to MLK

Monday, August 1, 1966

L. H. Horace Perera, Secretary General of the World Federation of United Nations Associations (WFUNA), invites Dr. King to be the speaker of honor at the 20th Plenary Assembly of WFUNA.

Telegram from Harry G. Boyte to Rev. John Papandrew

Harry Boyte expresses his happiness that Rev. John Papandrew will be working with the SCLC.

Telegram to Dr. King Regarding Commissioner of Commerce

Tuesday, March 5, 1968

In this telegram, Dr. King is informed that his telegram to Katherine C. Peden, Commisioner of Commerce State Office is undelivered.

Antidotes For Fear

Dr. King uses this sermon to discuss the causation of human fears while identifying four ways in which these shortcomings can be combated. He does not promote the eradication of all human fears, for some are essential to creation and innovation. However, Dr. King encourages the elimination of unfounded fears as a method to overcome adversities that are experienced in life.

Problem of Evil

Dr. King writes about the problem of evil according to the 10th chapter of Proverbs.

The Urban Coalition's National Coordinators Weekly Report

Friday, December 8, 1967

This document contains The Urban Coalition's national coordinators weekly report. The report consists of a schedule of activities, a list of the Task Force on Educational Disparities members, and a list of the Task Force on Housing, Reconstruction, and Investment members.

The SCLC and Leadership of MLK

The various protest mechanisms and action organizations serves as a long lasting contribution to the Negro community initiated by the movement in the South. The church has served as a location for organization which progresses community participation. During slavery, the slaves were allowed to congregate only at weddings and funerals. Many of these events were fabricated in order to create a means of collective communication between the slaves. The author asserts that it was in this tradition that the SCLC was formed.

Letter from P. M. Smith to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, June 30, 1964

P. M. Smith writes Dora McDonald thanking her on Dr. Ruden's behalf for a letter regarding Dr. King's visit to Amsterdam. Miss Smith references a previous correspondence from Dr. Ruden's informing Miss McDonald of the schedule for Dr. King's visit.

The Word of God

Dr. King references Karl Barth on the "word of God."

Letters from Jeanette Allen Behre to MLKCharles. H. Behre to MLK

Thursday, June 1, 1967

Two professors of Columbia University, Dr. Jeanette Allen Behre and Chas. H. Behre Jr., express their dissent with Dr. King taking a public stand on the war in Vietnam. The professors feel Dr. King is jeopardizing his support for the civil rights.

Financial Statement for SCLC - OEO

Monday, May 15, 1967

The Anti-Poverty Coordinating Committee of the SCLC sends this budget outline to the Office of Economic Opportunity in request of financial changes.

MLK Address Regarding the Negro Family

Thursday, January 27, 1966

In this address, Dr. King discusses the struggles of the Negro family. He states that the Negro family's life determines the individuals' capacity to love. Dr. King also discusses how American slavery has impacted the Negro family.

Letter from MLK to Rev. M. L. Shepard, Sr.

Monday, February 26, 1962

Dr. King thanks Rev. M. L. Shepard for his "generous gift." Dr. King stresses the importance of support from friends like Rev. Shepard for the survival of SCLC. He also informs Rev. Shepard that he will receive material from the SCLC to update his congregation on the progress of work in the South.

Birmingham Manifesto

The Birmingham Manifesto was formulated as a testament to explain the reasons why efforts were being made to desegregate Birmingham. According to the Manifesto, broken promises were made by city and state officials, which led to plans of direct action.

Humanism

Dr. King quotes Algernon Charles Swinburne's "Hymn of Man" and William Ernest Henley's "Invictus" as representative of humanist thought.

Telegram from MLK to Mrs. Evelyn White

Wednesday, November 22, 1967

Dr. King informs Mrs. White that he received the materials sent to him. He also notes that he is unable to make a decision regarding his schedule and availability.

Making the Best of a Bad Mess

In this sermon, Dr. King discusses the letter Paul sent to Titus while he was in Crete. According to the letter, Crete was a terrible place for Christians, and Titus may have been confused as to why he was left there. Paul wrote to him saying that he left him there to make the situation better for the other people there. That is how one makes the best out of a bad mess.

Letter from MLK to Takarekpenztar

Dr. King offers his gratitude to the workers of the Country Savings Bank XIII in Budapest for naming their socialist labor brigade after Dr. King. Unable to understand any of the names from the initial letter, Dr. King addresses this letter to "Takarekpenztar" or "savings bank" in Hungarian.

Letter from Kate Krauthemier to MLK about a St. Louis Appearance

Monday, August 17, 1964

In this letter, Kate Krautheimer of the Artists and Speakers Bureau,urgently requests an appearance from Dr. King to St. Louis University.

A Religion of Doing

Dr. King delivered this sermon at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church on July 4, 1954. In the sermon, Dr. King asserts the importance of active religion over passive theoretical practice. Citing the Book of Matthew, he maintains that belief and action must be united, as action is the crux of true religion. He proclaims that the church has to be a passage of the "dynamic force" that encourages action of its members.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK

Monday, February 27, 1967

In this letter, is enclosed a check from Alfred A. Knopf Inc. for the use of "What Next? Five Negro Leaders Reply" in the book "Minorities In A Changing World by Milton L. Baron.

Urban Insurance Coverage

Congressman William S. Moorhead introduces legislation to the House of Representatives, seeking to improve urban insurance coverage and provide governmental riot reinsurance.

Class Notes

Dr. King references several biblical scriptures regarding topics of ethics, knowledge, man, sin and God.

Letter from F. N. Campbell to Ralph David Abernathy

In this letter F. N. Campbell commends Abernathy for his dignified and effective handling of the first phase of the People's March in Washington, DC. It is his hope to utilize the climate of response following Dr. King's assassination. To this end, he proposes the establishment of a foundation in memory of Dr. King.

Letter from Gaylord Nelson to MLK

Thursday, July 2, 1964

Wisconsin Democratic Senator Gaylord Nelson writes Dr. King expressing his gratitude for his kind letter regarding the passage of the Civil Rights Act. Senator Nelson reports that many of his constituents were solidly in favor of the bill.

Letter from Congressman James G. O'Hara to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965

Congressman James G. O'Hara, US Representative from Michigan, informs Dr. King that he has signed the home rule discharge petition for the District of Columbia.

Letter from David Gibbons and David O. Woodward to MLK

Wednesday, June 5, 1963

David Woodyard and David Gibbons send Dr. King a check to support the work of the SCLC. Woodyard and Gibbons are employed at Denison University in Granville, Ohio.

Letter from W. P. Buckwalter, Jr. to MLK

Friday, July 30, 1965

W. P. Buckwalter, Jr. writes the SCLC enclosing a check from various church groups to be used toward Selma expenses.

Financial Statement Regarding "Stride Toward Freedom"

Sunday, December 31, 1961

In this document, the number of books that were sold during the six month period to December 1961 are shown.

People in Action: Unknown Heroes

Thursday, May 10, 1962

This New York Amsterdam News article by Dr. King introduces two unknown heroes of the Civil Rights Movement in the South, Esau Jenkins and Billy Fleming. Jenkins taught the riders on his buses how to read and write so they could qualify to vote. This idea was the basis for SCLC's Citizenship School program. Fleming, an undertaker in Clarendon County, South Carolina, was a leader in the Briggs v. Elliott school desegregation lawsuit, the earliest of five suits to be combined in the US Supreme Court?s landmark 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision.