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Letter from MLK to Mrs. Norman Seldes

Thursday, August 20, 1964

In this carbon copy of a letter to Mrs. Norman Seldes, Dr. King sends his appreciation for response to a letter of recent date.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Louis Andrews Sims

Tuesday, November 6, 1962

Dr. King informs Mrs. Louis Andrews Sims that due to his multiple responsibilities within the SCLC and his various pastoral duties, he will not be able to accept speaking engagements at this time. He assures her that if his schedule clears up, he will be happy to accept her "gracious invitation."

Amsterdam News: The Terrible Cost of the Ballot

Saturday, September 1, 1962

Dr. King excites public confidence towards the Civil Rights Movement by describing a devastating occurrence.

Letter from Leonard Kane to MLK

Monday, March 15, 1965

Leonard Kane, Chairman of the Democratic Town Committee, sends Dr. King a financial contribution on behalf of the committee. He also expresses the importance of democracy for all.

Letter from MLK to Mr. P. H. Waldraff

Dr. King shares his views of the American military presence in Vietnam and America's moral obligation to social justice.

Letter from Cornell's L. Paul Jaquith to MLK

Monday, November 7, 1960

L. Paul Jaquith writes Dr. King regarding his upcoming visit to Cornell University. The student body seeks to discuss issues relating to the inequality of opportunities for Negroes in the United States.

Marx

Dr. King references German philosopher Karl Marx regarding his teachings. King states, "Marx teaching resolves into three principal elements: a philosophy of history, and economic theory, and a practical program for the realization of a new social order."

Letter from Leroy R. Weiner

Monday, July 18, 1966

Leroy R. Weiner writes Mr. Harry Belafonte addressing a recent appeal made on behalf of the organization SNCC.

Give Decency A Chance in the South...

The Southern Conference Educational Fund (SCEF) is working toward eliminating "all forms of racial segregation in the Southern and border States." This brochure highlights SCEF's accomplishments, supporters, programs and future.

Letter from Agatha G. Horn to MLK

Friday, April 2, 1965

Agatha Horn, the Worthy Grand Matron (presiding officer) of the Eureka, Illinois Grand Chapter of the Order of the Eastern Star, a Freemasonry affiliate, sends Dr. King a contribution and expresses how he has proven himself to be a man of integrity, courage and humility.

Letter from MLK to W. David Angus

Monday, October 14, 1963

This letter is in response to Mr. W. David Angus from Dr. King, referencing an invite to speak in Montreal. However, Dr. King acknowledged that he would be out of the country.

Letter from Ernestine Lee to MLK

Thursday, December 7, 1967

A fourteen-year-old child, inspired by Dr. King's speeches, sends a small contribution and a prayer to the King family.

Letter from MLK to Richmond M. Rudden

Wednesday, October 27, 1965

Dr. King defers an invitation to speak at Lafayette College until a later date.

The Negro Past and It's Challenge for the Future

In honor of Negro History Week, Dr. King offers this speech on the black community's past and future in America.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ivor M. Liss

Friday, April 19, 1963

Dora McDonald thanks Ivor M. Liss for his contribution, and informs him that Dr. King will be in contact upon his return from Birmingham, Alabama.

MLK on the Death of Paul Tillich

Dr. King comments on the life and deeds of Paul Tillich, a German-American theologian and a major influence on the philosophies of Dr. King.

Levels of Love

Sunday, May 21, 1967

Dr. King describes five levels of love, from lowest to highest: utilitarian love, friendship, romantic love, humanitarian love, and agape. The last he refers to as Christian love, the love of God operating in the human heart. The first four, he states, are love for one’s own sake. The fifth is love for another person for their sake. This sermon was delivered by Dr. King on May 21, 1967 at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia.

Revised School Desegregation Policies Under Civil Rights Act of 1964

Thursday, December 1, 1966

This document, published by the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, gives revised policies for school desegregation. The list of areas covered includes unequal programs and facilities, desegregation of staff and dismissals.

Letter to MLK from Paul Feldman

Friday, January 26, 1968

Paul Feldman is writing Dr. King about the new release of Michael Harrington's pamphlet "American Power in the Twentieth Century."

Review on "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community" 1967

Saturday, April 15, 1967

The Virginia Kirkus Review wrote this descriptive review on Dr. King's final book, Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community? The context of the review shows differences between the messages of Dr. King's earlier works and Where Do We Go From Here. Dr. King's earlier publications focused on the work of gaining decent treatment and basic civil rights for black Americans. However, this book heavily challenged the status quo in America.

God

Here, Dr. King writes a theoretical view of the existence of God.

Letter from Anonymous Critic to MLK

A critic sends Dr. King a series of newspaper clippings in order to communicate an adverse view about "negro people." The author brings special attention to an enclosed article about Stokely Carmichael and asks for his view. After accusing Dr. King of receiving money from the Communist Party, the writer states "I will never know why you was given the noble award."

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

Friday, December 11, 1964

This is a handwritten draft of the Nobel lecture. Dr. King delivered this lecture at the University of Oslo on December 11, 1964, the day after receiving the Peace Prize. Aware of the prestigious nature of the award and the global recognition it brought to the nonviolent struggle for racial justice in the US, King worked nearly a month on his address. He goes beyond his dream for America and articulates a vision of a World House in which a family of different races, religions, ideas, cultures and interests must learn to live together as brothers or perish together as fools.

Letter from MLK to Henry Luce

Thursday, February 28, 1963

Dr. King conveys his appreciation to Henry Luce for the invitation to attend the 40th Anniversary Dinner of Time Magazine. However, due to another engagement on the other side of the U.S., Dr. King regretfully cannot commit to come to the dinner.

Resolutions of Institute on Non-Violent Resistance to Segregation

Tuesday, August 11, 1959

This document contains SCLC resolutions of July 22-24, 1959, regarding nonviolence. The resolutions include: commending the 50th Anniversary Convention of the NAACP, thanking the staff of Spelman College, and calling upon organizations to "initiate plans against forms of racial discrimination."

Letter from Reverend Charles G. Adams to a Fellow Minister about the Concord Towers Campaign

Monday, March 25, 1968

In this letter, Rev. Charles G. Adams requests financial donations to be used for the Concord Towers Campaign in Boston, which is a campaign to benefit certain families currently living in substandard dwellings.

Lawyer Fined $50 in Inquiry Ouster

Saturday, August 20, 1966

New York lawyer, Arthur Kinoy, was carried out of the courtroom by authorities for disorderly conduct. Mr. Kinoy made history as this had never happened before in the legal system.

Letter from Edward F. Bell to MLK

Thursday, April 1, 1965

Attorney Edward Bell offers his legal services to Dr. King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Benjamin Mays to MLK

Friday, May 7, 1965

Dr. Mays informs Dr. King of his recommendation to confer an honorary degree from Morehouse College on Dr. J. Curtis Dixon. Mays includes a biographical sketch of Dr. Dixon and asks Dr. King to respond to the letter with his approval or disapproval.

Vietnam Week Pledge Card

The Student Mobilization Committee distributed this card as a promise to participate in the Student Week of Protest on April 8th- the 15th against the Vietnam war.