Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"UKRAINE"

Letter from J. Carter Fahy to Mr. Roy Wilkins about NAACP Name Change

Friday, July 28, 1967

In this letter to the president of the NAACP, Fahy suggests changing the name of the NAACP to NAABA, replacing "colored people" with "Black Americans."

Jesus Christ

Dr. King highlights a quote from "Evil and the Christian Faith" by Nels F S. Ferre regarding Jesus and his relationship with humanity.

Freedom Walk Committee of Ithaca

This form letter from the Freedom Walk Committee of Ithaca and the Cornell Committee Against Segregation announces both the guest appearance of Dr. King as well as a fundraising drive for the SCLC.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An anonymous individual sends Dr. King newspaper clippings showing African-Americans participating in looting and violence. Dr. King is asked to review the articles and offer comments via television.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. Otis Moss

Wednesday, January 9, 1963

Dora McDonald informs Rev. Otis Moss, Dr. King's former co-pastor at Ebenezer Baptist Church, that Dr. King will not be able to accept his invitation to speak at Mt. Zion Baptist Church for Men's Day due to his travels.

Letter From Otis Roberts to MLK

Friday, June 30, 1967

Otis Roberts, a Grants Officer for the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, asks that Dr. King send him a signed copy of the enclosed Grant Award for SCLSC's Basic Adult Education Project for Urban Negroes.

Professor Andrew Blane Offers Assistance to MLK

Saturday, November 4, 1967

Andrew Blane, Assistant Professor of History at Hunter College, offers to brief Dr. King on the role of religion in Russian culture, particularly the Russian Baptists. He attaches along with his letter, a description of his "scholarly interests and training" for Dr. King to consider.

Article Written by MLK for The Progressive

In this unfinished draft of an article for The Progressive, Dr. King writes about the social ills of America through the context of what he calls the two most important documents in American history: the Declaration of Independence and the Emancipation Proclamation.

Ezekiel and the Philosophy of History

Dr. King records his interpretation of Ezekiel and the Oracles against Foreign Nations. He asserts that the Biblical series affirms monotheism and a "providential philosophy of history."

Nature and Perception

Dr. King discusses his philosophical perspective on perception and nature.

Gethsemane

Dr. King notes the Biblical story of Jesus' experience before his crucifixion. He uses the parable to speak to the human experience of pain and the faith one must have in God. Jesus went to Gethsemane to pray. He brought apostles John, James, and Peter and had them take watch while he prayed in the garden. When Jesus returned, his friends were sleeping. At this moment, Jesus realized their indifference to his agony. Though standing in pain and loneliness, Jesus used his faith in God to accept his situation as it was, with no efforts of escape.

Letter from M. Strawder to MLK

Wednesday, February 2, 1966

M. Strawder welcomes Dr. King to the Chicago community while informing him of the current social struggles that they are faced with.

Observer: The Fiery Savior

Journalist Ponchitta Pierce sends Dr. King an article that details the press conference of "The Militant." In response to questioning, the individual expresses their discontent with liberal politics, the United States of America, and its presence in Vietnam.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ethelyn L. Hall

Monday, December 9, 1963

Miss McDonald sends Ethelyn Hall information that Dr. King thinks Hall will find helpful.

Letter from Samuel Starr to MLK

Friday, January 12, 1968

Mr. Starr shares his thoughts regarding the "negro people," suggesting they go back to Africa and organize civilization under Dr. King's leadership.

The Danger of Misguided Goodness

Under the title, "The Danger of Misguided Goodness," the central message in these sermon notes is the need for all individuals to be morally conscientious.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, March 13, 1967

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that Constance Webb would to ask him questions regarding the biography she is writing on Richard Wright.

MLK to Ozie Vincent at Chicago's WBEE

Dr. King apologizes to Mr. Vincent for not being able to tape five messages for his program in the month of December.

Press Conference on Chicago Movement

Wednesday, July 7, 1965

Dr. King shares his acceptance of the invitation to spend some time in Chicago. During his time in Chicago, Dr. King and other SCLC leaders plan to assist local civil rights organizations in organizing rallies throughout the city.

Letter from Carmen Rivera to Mrs. King 4/5/68

Carmen Rivera, a young girl from NYC, writes to Mrs. King to offer her condolences after the assasination of Dr. King.

A Country Called Corporate America

Sunday, July 3, 1966

New York Times Magazine writer Andrew Hacker writes about the growing problems caused by the "bigness" of corporate America. He says that large corporations are beginning to have so much power that they can damage the society without having to account for the consequences, as "corporate wealth buys corporate wishes." Some of the ways that they effect society are through their advertisements, their control of the labor market and education.

Letter from Mr. Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Saturday, September 15, 1962

Benjamin Mays, President of Morehouse College, informs Dr. King he has reviewed the document sent to President Kennedy on 5/17/62.

Song of Songs

Dr. King writes a brief summary of the book Song of Songs.

Letter from National Committee for Free Elections in Sunflower to MLK

Monday, August 14, 1967

The National Committee for Free Elections in Sunflower informs Dr. King of the tremendous strides made by the African American community during the elections in Sunflower County, Mississippi. Four years prior, the loss of elections by black candidates was attributed to local intimidation, but new organizational tactics provided the group with tools to combat this issue. The success of the election set a precedent for many other Mississippi counties to view voting rights as a means to change citizens' lives and the nature of the state.

Letter from Thomas Johnson to MLK

Monday, November 20, 1967

Thomas Johnson, a reporter for the New York Times, writes to Dr. King requesting his participation in a symposium to be published in Playboy, regarding the civil rights movement.

Letter from Steve Delaney to William P. Lampkin

Monday, August 9, 1965

Steve Delaney, Assistant New Director for WSOC, writes William Lampkin regarding Dr. King's visit to Montreat, North Carolina. Delaney thanks Lampkin for providing updates about the visit and also asks for additional information about Dr. King's planned speech.

Letter from Clarence Jones to MLK

Friday, May 15, 1964

Clarence Jones writes Dr. King requesting commentary concerning "The World March Towards Human Rights: Luncheon on May 28, 1964."

Statement by MLK

Monday, March 4, 1968

Dr. King warns the United States about the possibility of downfall should the federal government fail to change its policies. He sets a date for the SCLC to go to Washington D.C. and lead nonviolent demonstrations with the purpose of eradicating racism and poverty in America.

Telegram from Joseph Lowery to Wyatt Walker

Friday, November 3, 1967

Reverend Joseph E. Lowery writes to Reverend Wyatt Walker acknowledging his support of Walker's "sacrifice in behalf of freedom and justice for all."