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"UKRAINE"

Telegram from Randolph Blackwell to Mr. M. H. Thomas

Friday, August 6, 1965
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Randolph T. Blackwell sends a telegram to M. H. Thomas to permit the SCLC to honor requests for telephone installations made by Carole Hoover.

Chapter IV - Weiman's Conception of God

Dr. King professes his ideas and viewpoints as they relate to Henry Nelson Wieman's theology on God. Wieman, an American philosopher of Naturalistic Religion, believed that God was a natural process rather than a supernatural entity.

Letter from Julian Bond to MLK

Thursday, August 10, 1967
New York, NY

Co-Chairman Julian Bond welcomes Dr. King and other members of the SCLC to the National Conference for New Politics. Bond also comments on past civil rights victories, and he mentions future organizational directions.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Stokley Carmichael

Tuesday, November 29, 1966

In this letter, Dora McDonald informs Stokley Carmichael about an enclosure of an autographed photograph of Dr. King.

Letter from Agatha G. Horn to MLK

Friday, April 2, 1965
Chicago, IL

Agatha Horn, the Worthy Grand Matron (presiding officer) of the Eureka, Illinois Grand Chapter of the Order of the Eastern Star, a Freemasonry affiliate, sends Dr. King a contribution and expresses how he has proven himself to be a man of integrity, courage and humility.

Progress

Dr. King quotes Herbert Spencer regarding the inevitability of progress.

Patripassianism

Dr. King gives a definition of patripassianism.

Letter from Louis C. Blount to MLK

Friday, August 5, 1966
Michigan (MI), Atlanta, GA, Detroit, MI

Louis Blount of the Great Lakes Mutual Life Insurance Company in Michigan encloses a check to the SCLC.

Draft of Speech On Passage of 1965 Voting Rights Act

Dr. King discusses the prevalence of racial issues in society. Discrimination and segregation still occur but through means in which the government has not declared unconstitutional. One of the main problems discussed was housing discrimination. Many African Americans were forced to live in slum housing in bad areas because they were not able to buy a house in the "white neighborhoods." Dr. King states that this type of social injustice cannot continue if the nation wants to progress.

Letter from James R. Smith to MLK

Georgia (GA)

James R. Smith, the director of the Youth Christian Education Department of Athens Community, inquires if Dr. King can support his program by giving a donation.

Sin

Dr. King notes that in Ezekiel 18, the prophet establishes himself as the father of individualism, unlike his predecessors who focused primarily upon the nation.

Promotional Article for Why We Can't Wait

Birmingham, AL

This Harper released publication contains a preview of the religious books to be published in the summer and fall of 1964. Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait" is featured with the byline "The 'Man of the Year' writes the 'Book of the Year'."

Letter to Rev W. Harold Row from MLK about the Annual Brethren Service Dinner

Wednesday, March 27, 1968
Illinois (IL)

In this letter to Reverend Row, Dr. King declines an invitation to speak at the Annual Brethren Service Dinner due to previous commitments with the Washington Poor People's Campaign.

Letter from W. P. Buckwalter, Jr. to MLK

Friday, July 30, 1965
New Jersey (NJ), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

W. P. Buckwalter, Jr. writes the SCLC enclosing a check from various church groups to be used toward Selma expenses.

Is It Wrong to Segregate?

Sunday, June 5, 1960
Atlanta, GA, Illinois (IL), ETHIOPIA, Texas (TX), CUBA

This Sermon titled "Is It Wrong to Segregate?" was delivered by the Reverend A. L. Kendrick on June 5, 1960. He expounds on several topics including equal rights, communism and the political element of the government.

Letter from Congressman Charles Diggs to MLK

Monday, July 22, 1963
Washington, D.C., Michigan (MI)

Michigan Congressman Charles Diggs returns the proposed plans for the August 28th, 1963 "March on Washington" to Dr. King.

The Future of Integration

Friday, August 21, 1959
Wisconsin (WI)

Dr. King discusses the various forms of segregation and the corresponding legislative acts that affect African Americans at the National Convention of the Fellowship of Reconciliation. King also provides details of how he hopes integration will take place.

Letter from MLK's Secretary to Dr. Lawrence D. Reddick

Wednesday, November 18, 1964
Maryland (MD), Baltimore, MD, Oslo, Norway

Dr. King's secretary sends Dr. Lawrence D. Reddick information regarding the upcoming trip to Oslo, Norway. The trip is associated with Dr. King's acceptance of the Nobel Peace Prize.

Memo to Organizations Interested in the Success of the Anti-Poverty Program

Wednesday, July 20, 1966
Washington, D.C.

Richard W. Boone requests Dr. King's support in assisting with the success of the Anti-Poverty Program.

Letter from Samuel McKinney to MLK

Monday, June 20, 1966
Washington (WA), Jackson, MS, Mississippi (MS)

Reverend McKinney, of the Mt. Zion Baptist Church, informs Dr. King he is unable to participate in the Mississippi Freedom March. A check from the Mt. Zion congregation is enclosed to assist with registering voters.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding Article Fee

Thursday, November 19, 1964
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Ms. Daves encloses Dr. King's fee for his article in the "Saturday Evening Post" and discusses issues concerning future reprints of this particular work.

Letter from Warren R. Austin to MLK

Wednesday, September 17, 1958

In this letter, Mr. Austin, Honorary Chairman of The Committee of One Million, writes to Dr. King and encloses an advanced review copy of the "Black Book on Red China." The book is scheduled to be published soon and was commissioned by the Committee of One Million as an "international public service."

WBTV Editorial: "King's Bedfellows"

Monday, February 19, 1968
North Carolina (NC), PUERTO RICO, Cambridge, MA, Washington, D.C.

The content of this document suggested that Dr. King break ties with leaders Stokley Carmichael and H. Rap Brown, due to their stance on violence as a weapon. At the bottom of this document, is an invitation for Dr. King, H. Rap Brown and Stokley Carmichael to respond.

The Voice: A Bulletin of Crozer Theological Seminary

Chester, PA

Dr. King received a copy of this publication from Crozer, which provided alumni updates, religious articles, financial supporters, and current and upcoming seminary events.
Dr. King graduated with honors from Crozer in 1951 as class valedictorian.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, October 30, 1964
New York, NY, GREECE

Joan Daves relays information to Dr. King regarding new publishing opportunities. She writes, "Greece, which has thus far been completely impossible for any foreign rights sales, is "opening up" and it is possible to place certain books for publication in that territory."

Letter from Helen Harris to MLK

Wednesday, October 28, 1964
CANADA

Helen Harris, Chairman of the First Unitarian Congregation of Toronto's Social Action Committee, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letters from Irvine I. Turner to MLK

Tuesday, April 17, 1962
New Jersey (NJ)

Irvine I. Turner requests, in three different letters, Dr. King provide an endorsement for reelection to the Newark Municipal Council.

SCLC Press Release: 1967 Election Results

Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

This SCLC release hails the election of America's first two black mayors, Carl Stokes in Cleveland, Ohio and Richard Hatcher in Gary, Indiana. The release stresses that such men "cannot do the job alone" and condemns efforts in Congress to cut the War on Poverty even as billions are spent on the Vietnam War.

Supererogation

Dr. King defines supererogation.

Letters To Mrs. Fillmore from MLK

Thursday, April 19, 1962
Georgia (GA)

Dr. King responds to Mrs. Fillmore's previous letter, offering some suggestions to help her. He apologizes that he cannot use SCLC funds because that money is currently in use for the civil rights struggle. Dr. King suggests alternative organizations and programs that may offer her assistance.