Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"UKRAINE"

Letter from Rachel Davis DuBois to MLK

Monday, August 29, 1966

Ms. Dubois writes to Dr. King regarding the strategy of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches. She believes that a change in attitude of whites, so that they desire to work with "Americans of darker complexion" should be a part of this strategy.

Letter from Glen Nixon to SCLC

Tuesday, February 28, 1967

Glen Nixon offers to participate in the SCLC's Chicago project in order to gain a better understanding of Northern slums. Nixon asks to be referred to other programs and organizations, if his assistance is not needed in Chicago.

Letter from Louise M. Meriwether to MLK

Tuesday, March 19, 1968

Louise M. Meriwether requests an endorsement from Dr. King in protesting the filming of the book "The Confessions of Nat Turner" written by William Styron.

Financial Statement Regarding "Stride Toward Freedom"

Sunday, December 31, 1961

In this document, the number of books that were sold during the six month period to December 1961 are shown.

Letter from MLK to David J. Walker

Wednesday, January 13, 1965

Dr. King declines an invitation from the Junior Board of Trade to speak in Toronto.

Letter from Joseph Matasovsky to MLK

Thursday, April 23, 1964

A member of the Slovak Catholic Sokol expresses their respect for Dr. King's action against the Vietnam War. The author deems Dr. King a "patriot" and appreciates his spiritual profundity, as well as his intellect surrounding national politics.

Letter from A. Dudley Ward to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

A. Dudley Ward, General Secretary for the General Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Methodist Church, forwards an enclosed resolution to Dr. King.

Letter from Weston E. Vivian to MLK

Monday, January 11, 1965

Congressman Weston Vivian responds to Dr. King's letter regarding the seating of the Mississippi Congressman. He tells Dr. King that he not only supported the "Ryan fairness resolution" to prevent the seating, but also voted against the motion to swear in the Congressman. Although he mentions that he was in the minority regarding this matter, he assures Dr. King that he will continue to "work for the opening of the Mississippi registration and election procedures."

Addition to "Pilgrimage to Nonviolence"

This augmentation was intended to be included in Dr. King's "Pilgrimage to Nonviolence" essay published in the Christian Century on April 13, 1960. In the appendage, Dr. King discusses the personal afflictions he has endured as a result of his civil rights work including death threats, bombings of his home, and a near fatal stabbing. He states that suffering has a "redemptive quality" and discusses how he transformed his personal suffering into a "creative force" instead of reacting with bitterness.

Save the Children of Mississippi Resolutions

Tuesday, February 27, 1968

Barbara Greene issues a memo for the Ad Hoc Committee to Save the Children of Mississippi that includes resolutions to protest federal funding cutbacks of Head Start programs in Mississippi and interpretation of the Green Amendment regarding maximizing participation in such programs by the poor. She attaches a copy of a telegram sent to Sargent Shriver, Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity.

Letter from Betty Doocy to MLK

Monday, April 17, 1967

Betty Doocy of Chicago, Illinois mildly criticizes Dr. King for leading marches in an effort to integrate neighborhoods in Chicago. She tells Dr. King of her experiences living in poverty as a non-Negro, and how her family has been able to survive and endure hardships. Doocy encourages Dr. King to instruct Negroes to properly take care of their living quarters and to be respectable in their job professions.

Letter from Irv Kupcinet to MLK

Irv Kupcinet of the Chicago Sun-Times extends an invitation to Dr. King for an appearance on his television show, after receiving word of the Reverend's presence in the city.

Letter from Edmund Gordon to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968

Edmund W. Gordon expresses his gratitude for Dr. King's agreement to use his name in connection with the development of a Memorial Park honoring W.E.B Dubois. Mr. Gordon also informs Dr. King of the other participants of the project along with a brief description of his professional background.

Letter from MLK to Robert Kennedy

Thursday, March 28, 1963

Dr. King urges Attorney General Kennedy to act on behalf of the Negro citizens in LeFlore County who are being attacked for working in voter registration or becoming registered voters.

Letter from Bill Kunstler to MLK

Friday, August 9, 1963

Famed civil rights attorney William Kunstler states that this was the first time a federal court enjoined prosecution of contempt cases under a state injunction. He would like to use the same procedures in Mississippi.

Letter from Marilyn Coulter to MLK

Saturday, October 26, 1963

Marilyn Coulter asks Dr. King to provide information for her research paper entitled "Segregation."

Rauschenbusch on Sin

Dr. King references and outlines Rauschenbusch's view on sin. Rauschenbusch was a Baptist minister and a key figure in the Social Gospel movement.

SCLC Press Release About a Mississippi Political Rally

Thursday, February 8, 1962

This press release describes a political rally of Negro voters in Clarksdale, Mississippi at which Dr. King spoke. It declares the need for voter registration and the possibility for Mississippi to have as many as five African-American congressmen in Washington.

Why We Can't Wait Book Review

Monday, June 22, 1964

This article highlights Dr. King's books "Why We Can't Wait" and "Stride Toward Freedom."

Letter from E. Z. Graves to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

E. Z. Graves adversely compares Dr. King, Stokely Carmicheal and Adam Clayton Powell to manure. Mr. Graves attaches an article entitled, "King and Carmicheal Maps Strategy for Summer Attacks on Big Cities."

The Christian Sense of Individuality

Dr. King quotes from "The Nature and Destiny of Man: A Christian Interpretation" by Reinhold Niebuhr, on the Christian sense of individuality.

Letter from Ben Selsby to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

Ben Selsby writes Dr. King in support of his stand on the Vietnam War and answers the critics by increasing his SCLC contribution.

Letter from Shelia Mills to MLK

Sunday, December 13, 1964

Shelia Mills, a 7th grade student, commends Dr. King for his efforts within the nonviolence movement and for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Photo of MLK

An unidentified photo of Dr. King from the Morehouse Collection.

The Gibson Report

Monday, April 1, 1968

The Gibson Report illustrates the economic status of employed and unemployed African American women in the U.S. It also compared the incomes of white and black Americans.

Article Written by MLK for The Progressive

In this unfinished draft of an article for The Progressive, Dr. King writes about the social ills of America through the context of what he calls the two most important documents in American history: the Declaration of Independence and the Emancipation Proclamation.

Letter from Joan Daves to Ms. Dora McDonald

Thursday, July 16, 1964

Joan Daves tells Dora McDonald that she had tentatively spoken to Dr. King about accepting the invitation to speak at The University Settlement award ceremony. She asks Ms. McDonald if she would keep the date for the engagement should he be able to attend. Daves also requests a copy of Dr. King's itinerary.

Letter from MLK to George Murphy

Tuesday, October 9, 1962

Dr. King thanks Rev. Murphy for giving witness in Albany, Georgia. Dr. King also comments on an upcoming vote and the role of churches in race relations.

Letter from Mrs. Barbara Gonye to MLK

Tuesday, January 2, 1968

This is a handwritten note from Mrs. Barbara Gonye to Dr. King questioning his position as a "Man of God" and a "Man of Peace". She also accuses Dr. King of having hate and being a troublemaker.

Sketch of MLK by Charles Keller

Thursday, May 7, 1959

This document features a 1959 sketch of Dr. King, signed, "In admiration," by Mr. Charles Keller.