Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Tokyo, Japan"

Letter from Maddy Tolud to MLK

Wednesday, November 3, 1965
NETHERLANDS

Maddy Tolud, the President of A. R. K., thanks Dr. King for being an honorary member of their organization. Tolud assures him that their members will actively work towards equality until justice prevails.

Jesus Christ

Dr. King quotes Baruch Spinoza's "Epistle 21" to Henry Oldenburg.

Letter from MLK to Peter Servetnyk

Thursday, July 14, 1966
CANADA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King declines an invitation from Peter Servetnyk to speak in Toronto.

The Power of Silence

Dr. King provides an account of several passages from the Bible, outlining his notes and interpretation.

Letter from Lillian M. Snyder to the Editor

Sunday, January 28, 1968
Maryland (MD), Baltimore, MD, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Lillian Snyder sends a letter to the editor of Sunpapers sharing her views on U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War.

The Christian Century: Civil Rights Bill Move to Fore

Wednesday, June 5, 1957
Washington, D.C.

The Christian Century expounds on the advancement of the Civil Rights Bill in the United States. The article highlights Dr. King as a "prophetic Christian leader" and details the Negros who assembled for the March on Washington. The author lists numerous reasons correlating the positive affect of allowing Negro's the right to vote.

Schleiermacher's Distinction

Dr. King documents German philosopher Friedrich Schleiermacher's view on one of the distinctions between Protestantism and Catholicism.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Richard T. Andrews, Jr.

Monday, October 21, 1963
Cleveland, OH, Birmingham, AL

Dr. King express thanks for the Mt. Zion Congregational Church's contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King details and outlines how their financial assistance will further foster the improvement of the racial issues in the South. The SCLC would be "caught in a dungeon of despair" if they did not have any moral support from various individuals and organizations.

Love

Dr. King quotes Ames' 1933 book entitled "Art" regarding the topic of love. "Love is the true life of man. God is love, and the kingdom of God is within us."

Greeks

GREECE

Dr. King shares his personal insight on Greek and African "ability," relative to African-Americans.

Iroquois Brewery-A Report from the President

In this document, Terry Fox, President of Iroquois Brewery, issued a report informing the public that their company implemented a "Learn-And-Earn Program. The program offered young people in Buffalo, New York temporary summer jobs, in an effort to train future adult workers. Unfortunately, there is no listed year, for the beginning of the program, highlighted in the document.

Letter from Pastor Paul S. Barru to MLK

Friday, May 21, 1965
Colorado (CO), Denver, CO, Alabama (AL), Selma, AL

The pastor of First Presbyterian Church in Glenwood Springs, Colorado sends the SCLC a contribution on behalf of his church and the Denver Christian Center. He references a recent Wilcox County, Alabama tour which he feels reflects the type of "creative" activity that is most beneficial for exposing "a window into the rural South for the ignorant North."

Co-Op Movements for Black Economic Development

Chicago, IL, California (CA), Virginia (VA), Mississippi (MS), Illinois (IL)

This memorandum sent to Dr. King by Professor St. Clair Drake, is a full proposal for the development/revival of the co-operative movements among negroes in large urban centers.

Letter from Pastor G. Murray Branch to MLK

Wednesday, June 7, 1967
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

In this letter, Pastor Branch invites Dr. King to be the speaker on the 90th Anniversary of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church.

Letter from Robert T. Handy to MLK

Wednesday, July 1, 1964
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Robert Handy of the Union Theological Seminary invites Dr. King to be the "major evening speaker" for their Conference on Race and Religion.

Anonymous Letter to Charles C. Diggs Jr.

Alabama (AL), New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), JAPAN

This anonymous letter to Congressman Charles Diggs, Jr. of Michigan details the grievances suffered by Negro and Caucasian females in the U.S. Army. The authors assert that they routinely are subjected to segregation in public accommodations and are denied equal opportunity for promotion and reenlistment.

Paul's Letter to American Christians

Sunday, November 4, 1956
Montgomery, AL, FRANCE, New York, NY, ISRAEL

Dr. King shares "Paul's Letter to American Christians" with the congregation of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama. In this contemporary letter revised by Dr. King, Apostle Paul writes concerning the "responsibilities of Americans to live as Christians." He discusses his appreciation for America, the danger of capitalism, communism, segregation in churches, and the many denominations of Protestantism. But above all things, Apostle Paul believes that love is the most "durable power in the world."

Letter from MLK to Agnes Mack

Saturday, December 10, 0196
Florida (FL), Washington, D.C., New York (NY)

Dr. King sends Agnes Mack a form to complete so that she may receive a copy of the "I have a Dream" speech.

Letter from Elisabeth Leonard to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967
New York (NY), VIETNAM

Elisabeth Leonard expresses her support and gratitude for Dr. King's work, which includes his speeches about the Vietnam War as well as an upcoming speech on the Spring Mobilization.

Progress Report from Robert L. Green to SCLC Staff

Tuesday, September 12, 1967
Virginia (VA), Chicago, IL, VIETNAM, San Francisco, CA, California (CA), New York, NY, New York (NY), Illinois (IL), Michigan (MI), Washington, D.C., Berkeley, CA

Mr. Green sends this report to the SCLC staff concerning the Chicago Adult Education Project (CAEP). He writes of the problems and difficulties concerning black communities such as Lawndale, Illinois. He then goes on to describe what the major objective is and how the CAEP can help communities, like those in Lawndale. He proposes "to develop basic, needed educational tools to improve reading, writing, consumer and personal budget skills, and to provide the project with job-seeking skills."

Science Surpasses the Social Order

JAPAN, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King wrote this essay during his career at Crozer Theological Seminary in 1951. In the paper, he discusses the disproportionate growth of science and technology compared with that of the social order. Referencing the sociological term, Dr. King refers to this predicament as "cultural lag." He attributes this problem to the "lack of world brotherhood" and asserts that the survival of civilization depends on global unity. Drawing on Republican politician Wendall Wilkie and Prime Minister Clement Attlee, Dr.

Thoughts on Nobel Prize

Dr. King uses a statement by Mahalia Jackson and the philanthropy of Sir Alfred Nobel to encapsulate the purpose of the Civil Rights Movement. Jackson refers to the racial problems in America as "family business," but Dr. King believes that in order for man to become a brotherhood, society has to search for truth like Alfred Nobel.

Tampa Tribune: MLK – A Religious Prophet

Saturday, November 7, 1964
Florida (FL)

In a letter to the editor, Rev. Gordon Christensen responds to The Tribune’s editorial “Peace Prize Puzzle,” saying the problem can be solved from both the secular and religious perspectives. King’s nonviolent resistance to segregation supports national law as laid out in the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Supreme Court decisions. The effort to gain freedom for Negroes through nonviolence offers the world an alternative to Communism as a means of ending colonialism.

Telegram from Vice Chancellor Newcastle University to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, November 1, 1967
Atlanta, GA

The Vice Chancellor of Newcastle University states that they "regretfully understand" Dr. King's inability to attend their engagement due to his current imprisonment.

Handwritten Notecard Defining Philosophy

Dr. King documents a quote from a book entitled "Philosophy of Religion".

Letter from Dora McDonald to Miss Rankin at the US Justice Department

Wednesday, July 29, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dora McDonald sends Miss Rankin of the Justice Department a copy of a statement made by Dr. King before the Republican Party. The statement was in reference to his proposed "Bill of Rights for the Disadvantaged."

Telegram from Mrs. Ernest Bavely to MLK

Wednesday, October 19, 1960
Atlanta, GA, Cincinnati, OH

Mrs. Bavely sends a supportive telegram to Dr. King during his confinement at the Fulton County Jail. She assures him "children of tomorrow, tomorrow, and tomorrow, will inherit those values for which you are striving."

Letter from Marshall Bean to MLK

Saturday, July 3, 1965
Maine (ME), Pennsylvania (PA)

Marshall Bean, a public school teacher suffering from cancer, writes Dr. King requesting an autographed picture and a "few words of joy."

Eulogy for Sixteenth Street Baptist Church Victims

Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

This is Dr. King?s eulogy for three of the four young girls killed in the 1963 bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. God gives man the right to exercise good and evil, King says, but God wills that everything will happen for the good ? that out of tragedy comes redemption. Martyred in the struggle for freedom, the girls have become symbols of the crusade and of the faith that sustains it. King speaks of forgiving those who murdered the girls and the need to transform the system, the way of life, and the philosophy that led to the bombing.

Letter from the Norway-American Association to MLK

Friday, October 23, 1964
NORWAY, Oslo, Norway

Ragnhild Galtung, director of the Norway-American Association, congratulates Dr. King on his Nobel Peace Prize and invites him to speak during his upcoming visit to Oslo.