Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Tokyo, Japan"

The Negro Heritage Library

The Negro Heritage Library sought to make the Negro community aware of the cultural "black-out" that was due to the inadequacies within the nations history books.The president of the library, Noel N. Marder, focused the energies and resources from the Educational Heritage. As the most respected spokesman for the Negro of his time, there is a section focused solely on Dr. King's work.

Letter from Harry Grossweiner to MLK

Wednesday, January 31, 1968

In this correspondence to Dr. King, Harry Grossweiner, Executive Vice President of Friends of Father Pire, Inc., expressed to Dr. King that he thought Dr. King would be interested in Father Pire's new book, and also indicated that any comments or suggestion would be appreciated.

Unity West Program

Thursday, June 1, 1967

Unity West issues this worship program for June 1967.

Letter from Ram Aurangabadkar and Dinkar Sakrikar to MLK

Tuesday, June 7, 1966

The Sarvajanik Kalyan Samiti society praises Dr. King for effectively using the method of "mass civil resistance" developed by Mahatma Gandhi. As a token of appreciation, the society would like to donate a bust of Mahatma Gandhi to be installed in a children's park in the United States. The society requests that Dr. King arrange the installment.

Royalty Statement re: Why We Can't Wait

Thursday, December 31, 1964

This royalty statement for the German edition of "Why We Can't Wait" has an itemization of royalties earned.

Letter from Jim Morton to Members of the UTC Board of Directors

Wednesday, June 28, 1967

Jim Morton communicates the results of the executive committee conference call in preparation for a board member conference call at a later date. The Urban Training Center for Christian Mission is dedicated to community action and supports additional organizations. The training center is attempting to input a new training program and have appointed three staff positions.

Letter from Beryl Arensberg to MLK

Sunday, May 21, 1967

Beryl Arensberg writes Dr. King asking him to consider a strategy that emphasizes a collective mourning for all those impacted by the Vietnam War. He believes such a course of action will inspire direct impact in several admirable ways.

The Pulpit: A Journal of Contemporary Preaching

As a "journal of contemporary preaching," The Pulpit includes numerous sermons and various religious teachings including Dr. King's "A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart."

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Wednesday, April 26, 1967

This document is a letter from Joan Daves to Martin Luther King Jr. in regards to New York Times Magazine's request to reprint Dr. King's publication: "Where We Are Going". April 26, 1967

Letter from Saifuddin Ahmed to MLK

Sunday, October 23, 1966

Saifuddin Ahmed writes on behalf of the East Pakistan Student Union inviting Dr. King to speak at their 10th Provincial Conference. The students also express their admiration for Dr. King's dedication and leadership to human rights worldwide.

Letter from Ross Bass to MLK

Thursday, April 29, 1965

Ross Bass, United States Senator, writes Dr. King expressing thanks for a previous letter regarding support for the proposed elimination of the poll tax.

Draft Letter from MLK Regarding Grand Freedom March

Dr. King addresses his "Brother-In-Christ" requesting assistance for an up and coming March for Freedom held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He makes three requests including financial and social support.

Telegram from Emory R. Searcy to MLK and Others

Dr. Searcy advises Dr. King and Dr. Abernathy to consider relinquishing their involvement with the Albany Movement. The sender suggests that this action may help to dispel contention resulting from "the presence of outsiders" and the process of negotiations.

Letter from Mrs. Ray Mitchell to MLK

Monday, August 12, 1963

Mrs. Ray Mitchell constructs this thoughtful letter to Dr. King thanking him not only for sending her a copy of his book, "Strength to Love," but also for his diligence as a clergyman.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to Ms. Dora McDonald Regarding Samples

Thursday, June 25, 1964

In this letter, Ms. Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, is asking Ms. McDonald if Dr. King wants to see copies of the promotion for his book's paperback edition.

Letter from Chris Folcker to Joan Daves Regarding MLK Recording

Friday, January 13, 1967

In this letter, Chris Folcker informs Joan Daves of the limitations of the grammophone record with Dr. King and Harry Belafonte produced in Stockholm.

Letter from Douglas Mosley and Dwight Eisenhower Campbell to MLK

Thursday, September 3, 1964

The Methodist Youth Fellowship of Philadelphia extends an invitation for Dr. King to speak at their Freedom Rally in early 1965. The officers of the fellowship also request the address of Reverends Walter Fauntroy and Wyatt Walker of SCLC.

Wipe Out Police Brutality

Wednesday, January 1, 1964

This news bulletin created by the Nashville chapter of NAACP and the Davidson County Tennessee Independent Political Council implores African Americans to take action against police brutality and racial discrimination. To illustrate the point, the bulletin contains several pictures capturing police actions against student demonstrators. The article encourages the community's 30,000 unregistered Negro voters to "join the fight for freedom" by registering to vote, writing their Congressmen, and making their voices heard.

Letter from William Woodall to MLK

Saturday, March 30, 1968

Mr. Woodall relays instructions from God concerning Dr. King's next march.

Jesus

Dr. King highlights the significant characteristics of Jesus Christ.

Invitation from Henry Ford II

Friday, October 9, 1964

This letter from Henry Ford II is an invitation to a charitable dinner honoring General Eisenhower for receiving the Family of Man Award. The proceeds from the dinner will fund the programs of the Council which will aid families and youth.

Dr. MLK and the American Dream

The article talks about Dr.King addressing the issue of racial imbalance in Boston public schools. Dr. King expresses his opinion that "racial segregation is politically unsound and relegates persons to the status of things, stigmatizing persons of color as untouchables in a caste system.

Letter from Catherine Enge to MLK

Wednesday, February 17, 1965

Catherine Enge, on behalf of the Bergens Kristenruss, asks Dr. King to write a newspaper article that will be distributed to approximately 12,000 Norwegians.

Modern Day Samson

Wednesday, August 2, 1967

Radio Station WDIX in South Carolina broadcasts an editorial answering the question, "Why does the Negro attack his white neighbor?" Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community" serves as the primary reference, alluding to the discrimination reflected in the proportion of whites who would not support interracial relationship and any efforts of integration.

Letter from MLK to Louis Simon

Tuesday, January 16, 1962

Dr. King thanks Louis Simon of the Amalgamated Laundry Workers Joint Board for his thoughts about Dr. King's speech in Miami and the financial contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King explains that the holiday season is one of the hardest times of the year for the SCLC.

Anabaptists

Dr. King outlines historical information regarding the Anabaptists and the religious philosophy of the group.

Letter from Douglas B. Leeds to MLK

Thursday, March 21, 1968

Douglas Leeds, Campus Coordinator for Choice '68 at Babson Institute of Business Administration, writes Dr. King to request any information regarding his political views. He also invites Dr. King to speak at the Institute in the future.

Pathos and Hope

Saturday, March 3, 1962

Dr. King speaks about a trip to the Mississippi Delta where he first witnessed hope and pathos simultaneously.

President Johnson Requests Off the Record Conversation

Monday, February 13, 1967

Clifford L. Alexander Jr., Deputy Special Counsel to President Lyndon B. Johnson, conveys the President's request for an off the record meeting.

Bob Fitch Passes Letter to MLK Through Secretary McDonald

Bob Fitch makes mention of a letter that he feels would be of interest to Dr. King.