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Letter from Reverend Durstan R. McDonald to MLK Regarding an Invitation

Friday, March 15, 1968

The Hobart and William Smith Colleges have brought influential leaders to their campus from the civil rights and black power movements. Many students desire a further understanding of the Gospel and have requested to invite Dr. King to speak. The dates provided for this engagement are unfortunately subsequent to the assignation of Dr. King.

Letter from James E. Baine to MLK about Commentary

Wednesday, October 4, 1967

In this letter James Baine asks Dr. King about segregation and integrated for reference to be used in a college class.

MLK Speech at SCLC Staff Retreat

Monday, November 14, 1966

Dr. King addresses the staff of the SCLC at a retreat in Frogmore, South Carolina. He divides his speech into three parts: "whence we have come, where we have come, and where do we go from here." Dr. King thoroughly discusses his thoughts on Communism, the practice of nonviolence, the belief that racism is an "ontological affirmation,"and the weaknesses of Black Power.

Crisis In the Nation

Dr. King and Joseph E. Lowery inform an anonymous recipient of an urgent meeting of the SCLC Executive Board.

Letter from Glenn M. Dunkle to MLK

Wednesday, October 11, 1967

Glenn Dunkle, Senior Planner for the City of Richmond, Virginia, requests a copy of a bill proposed by Dr. King that addresses slums and housing clearance. The bill will be used by the Richmond City Planning Commission as it studies "methods of stimulating urban redevelopment and new low income housing."

Draft Letter from MLK to Ms. Giunier

Dr. King responds to an offer of assistance from a supporter. He directs her to the New York office to jumpstart her work and commends her for her interest in the Freedom Movement.

Telegram from Irv Kupcinet to MLK

Wednesday, July 7, 1965

Talk show host and columnist Irv Kupcinet invites Dr. King to make an appearance on his television panel. Mr. Kupcinet discloses knowledge of Dr. King's visit to Chicago for an announcement on July 24, 1965, and encourages the civil rights leader to appear on the show later that afternoon.

Letter to MLK from Paul Kennedy

Saturday, March 16, 1968

Paul Kennedy writes Dr. King to state that since Robert Kennedy announced his bid for the presidency, he believes hat an appreciative, token march on Washington would be more effective than a force march this year.

Schleiermacher (Religion as a Social Experience)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Letter from R. Lennox to MLK

Wednesday, November 25, 1964

Dr. King is invited to deliver the main address for The Presbyterian College of Montreal's Annual Convocation in April of 1965. The institution will be preparing to celebrate its 100th Anniversary.

Jesus' Ethical Character

Dr. King documents biblical passages that highlight Jesus' virtues.

Scientific Method and God

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman on the knowledge of God being unscientific. The content of this card appears verbatim in King's doctoral dissertation, "A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman."

Philadelphia Chapter of CORE Flyer

This flyer encourages participation in the reformation of the Philadelphia School System.

Letter from MLK to Delta Sigma Theta

Monday, January 30, 1967

This letter is in response to and appreciation of a contribution in the amount of $150 made, to the SCLC, by Delta Sigma Theta Sorority.

Letter to MLK from Paul Feldman

Friday, January 26, 1968

Paul Feldman is writing Dr. King about the new release of Michael Harrington's pamphlet "American Power in the Twentieth Century."

Letter From MLK to Eugene Exman

Friday, March 9, 1962

Dr. King, in this correspondence to Dr. Eugene Exman, expressed his joy in finding out that his book was selected, out of 500, to be presented to President John Kennedy. Dr. King, furthermore, apologized for a continued delay in finishing a manuscript of sermons for a second book. Dr. King's sermons would be converted into his second publication, "Strength to Love."

Declaration from the Southern Democratic Conference

The Southern Democratic Conference writes about new laws sponsored by the Jefferson County Legislative Delegation. Under the new legislation, the writer(s) feel as though the laws were "designed to dilute the citizen strength of the Negro and to deprive the black minority of opportunities hitherto available to the white group."

Telegram from MLK to Attorney General Robert Kennedy

Monday, July 8, 1963

Dr. King sends Attorney General Robert Kennedy a copy of the telegram he sent to Vice President Lyndon Johnson. The city of St. Augustine, Florida refuses to desegregate its facilities, which Dr. King describes as a "denial of Negro citizenship."

Blue Spiral Notebook

Contained in this notebook is a draft of Dr. King's statement to Judge James E. Webb following his arrest during the Rich's Magnolia Tea Room Sit-In. There is also an outline of a letter to female students who were arrested during the sit-in. On other pages a child practices handwriting.

Letter from Jack Delano to MLK

Tuesday, July 20, 1965

Jack Delano expresses how pleased the radio and television service of Puerto Rico is to learn that Dr. King has agreed to appear on their press interview program.

Gandhi Society for Human Rights

Thursday, May 31, 1962

The Gandhi Society for Human Rights lists the names of individuals whom they would like to serve on the organization's Board of Directors in which Dr. King serves as the Honorary President.

Harper & Row, Publishers' Royalty Statement for "Stride Toward Freedom

Monday, December 31, 1962

This document, dated in December of 1962, shows a statement of Dr. King's royalties from his first published book, Stride Toward Freedom. Notice that the retail price for the book was in the amount of $2.95. Harper & Row was the company that formulated the publication.

MLK's Transcript from Crozer Theological Seminary

Wednesday, December 6, 1950

In 1948, Dr. King entered Crozer Theological Seminary in Chester, Pennsylvania. Engaging in a sincere quest for knowledge, he sought stimulation in the works of several prominent areas, like philosophy and theology. As a result of his efforts and achievements at Crozer, Dr. King was chosen as the Valedictorian of the graduating class of 1951.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Prentiss Childs

Wednesday, May 20, 1964

Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, sends this letter to Mr. Prentiss Childs of CBS. The correspondence serves as documentation for reimbursement of Dr. King's recent trip to Washington, D.C.

Letter from Andrew Young to Professor G. Kuiper

Tuesday, November 2, 1965

Andrew Young, the Executive Assistant to Dr. King, writes Professor Kuiper of Vrije Universiteit expressing his contentment with pair's recent visit to Amsterdam. Young also inquires about the Dutch institution covering the civil rights leaders' travel expenses.

Letter from MLK to President Johnson on Greenville Air Base

Wednesday, August 10, 1966

Dr. King writes to President Johnson proposing the conversion of the Greenville Air Base to a center for training and housing for poverty-stricken Negro citizens of the Mississippi Delta. He urges that the program be coordinated by federal officials and representatives, that action be taken to provide decent housing and nondiscriminatory training programs, and that clear-cut procedures for evaluation be established.

Letter from Henry Wagner to MLK

Thursday, July 27, 1967

Henry B. Wagner writes a letter to Dr. King regarding Congress' increased appropriation for the Federal Aviation Agency. Mr. Wagner would prefer that those funds be given to mass ground transportation to increase safety and convenience.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Dr. King received this letter from an individual who urges that both poverty and the Vietnam War should be ended by helping Americans and building up communities, and then sending peaceful volunteers to South Vietnam to do the same. The author, who has several family members in the service, chooses not to sign their name, fearing retribution, and states that they wish to broadcast this message around the world.

Letter from Nicholas Katzenbach to MLK

Tuesday, August 30, 1966

U.S. Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach writes to Dr. King acknowledging his suggestion of using the Greenville Air Force Base to help alleviate the economic problems of Negro families in the Mississippi Delta. Katzenbach states that most of the land is no longer leased by the U.S. government but that Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1965 would apply to any educational programs.

Letter to MLK Regarding Nobel Peace Prize

Thursday, October 15, 1964

Dr. King receives a letter confirming the telephone call that informed him that he won the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. The author then invites Dr. King to come to Oslo to receive the prize.