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SCLC Proposal for Recruiting "Grass Root" Delegates

Monday, June 12, 1967
Alabama (AL), Washington, D.C., Florida (FL), Georgia (GA), Chicago, IL, Indiana (IN), Illinois (IL), Louisville, KY, Kentucky (KY), Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), North Carolina (NC), Cleveland, OH, Ohio (OH), South Carolina (SC), Tennessee (TN), Texas (TX), Virginia (VA), Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Minnesota (MN), Milwaukee, WI, Wisconsin (WI), Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Maryland (MD), Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA), Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Jacksonville, FL, Jackson, MS, New York, NY, New Orleans, LA

This document contains a proposal for recruiting 1,745 "grass root" delegates to the SCLC's 1967 Annual Convention. Also included is a desired amount of delegates from southern states, a proposed list of meeting places, and a budget for recruiting the delegates.

A Knock At Midnight

Sunday, August 9, 1964
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ), Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

In a tape-recorded address to the Riverside Church in New York City, Dr. King compares the civil rights struggle to a parable from St. Luke. His sermon specifically tackles contemporary social issues such as segregation, discrimination, and the philosophy of nonviolence. In addition, Dr. King explores the role of the church in dealing with such problems.

Esquire Magazine: The Red Chinese American Negro

New York, NY, Baltimore, MD, North Carolina (NC), CHINA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, CUBA, Birmingham, AL, LIBERIA, Detroit, MI

This segment of Esquire Magazine features an article discussing the militant activities of Robert F. Williams. Williams had returned home from military service and headed the Monroe, North Carolina branch of the NAACP. Frustrated by the inactivity of local legislation to reform segregation and aggravated by Klu Klux Klan attacks, Williams adopted more violent methodologies. The article also emphasizes his association with Chinese leader Mao Tse-tung and discusses Tse-tung's solidarity with racial goodwill policies.

Letter from Thomas R. Hughes to MLK

Tuesday, August 8, 1967
Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), South Carolina (SC), California (CA), Alabama (AL), Minnesota (MN)

Thomas R. Hughes, Executive Assistant to the Secretary of Agriculture, sends Dr. King Orville Freeman's Senate testimony on the Department's efforts to improve nutrition for low-income families and provide food assistance throughout the country.

Letter from Pastor H. Edward Whitaker to MLK

Thursday, March 22, 1962
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Boston, MA

Whitaker, a former classmate at Crozer Theological Seminary, request's Dr. King's advice concerning a new ministry position at a Southern State College.

Agenda for the Leadership Conference Executive Committee Meeting

Arnold Aronson sends the agenda for an upcoming meeting for the Executive Committee of the Leadership Conference. Important topics of discussion include the Civil Rights Act of 1967 and the Freedom Budget.

Letter from Gloria Caruthers to MLK

Saturday, October 17, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Miss Caruthers congratulates Dr. King on being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. She states that no other individual is more deserving of the award.


Dr. King cites Ludwig Andreas Feuerbach's work "Das Wesen der Religion," in which Feuerbach illustrates his perception of God.

Letter from Robert L. Green to Dora McDonald Regarding Dr. King's Biological Sketch

Monday, January 22, 1968
Michigan (MI)

This letter from Robert L. Green, Associate Professor, Michigan State University to Dora McDonald is to request copy of Dr. King's biographical sketch to be forwarded to an individual at Yeshiva University. The biographical sketch will be used in conjunction with Dr. King's paper "The Role of Behavioral Scientist in the Civil Rights Movement" which will be published in the American Psychological Association Journal and the Journal of Social Issues.

Letter from Clarence B. Jones to the Editor of New York Times

Friday, June 7, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Clarence Jones writes the editor of the New York Times to comment on a statement made by James Reston. According to Mr. Jones the statement was factually inaccurate and partially paraphrased.


Dr. King records his thoughts on the book of Deuteronomy to illustrate the oneness of God.

Is It Wrong to Segregate?

Sunday, June 5, 1960
Atlanta, GA, Illinois (IL), ETHIOPIA, Texas (TX), CUBA

This Sermon titled "Is It Wrong to Segregate?" was delivered by the Reverend A. L. Kendrick on June 5, 1960. He expounds on several topics including equal rights, communism and the political element of the government.

Letter from Frederick K. Arrington to MLK

Tuesday, February 16, 1965
Richmond, VA

Frederick Arrington of Third Street Bethel A. M. E. Church writes Dr. King on behalf of the male Ushers asking his permission to use a photo of Dr. King on key tags for a fundraiser.


This note card contains Dr. King's notes on the Old Testament book of Habakkuk.

Telegram from Muhammed Speaks Newspaper to MLK, Sr.

Tuesday, April 30, 1968
Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA, Illinois (IL), Georgia (GA)

Muhammed Speaks Newspaper contacts Martin Luther King, Sr. to confirm the presentation of a portrait of Dr. King, which is a gift of Muhammad Ali.

Letter from James R. Cary to MLK

Friday, January 17, 1964
Wisconsin (WI)

A representative from the Southwest Wisconsin Education Association invites Dr. King to serve as the keynote speaker at the organization's annual convention. The executive secretary tells Dr. King that they are interested in his "experience with education in the south and the entire United States," and feel that he would greatly enhance the convention by delivering the keynote speech. The sender also congratulates Dr. King on his recent "Man of the Year" honor by Time Magazine.

Letter from Daniel B. Brewster to MLK

Wednesday, April 28, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Senator Daniel B. Brewster writes Dr. King to thank him for urging his support for the elimination of the poll tax.

MLK in Memoriam

Washington, D.C., Pennsylvania (PA), VIETNAM, Georgia (GA)

Following Dr. King's assassination, this tribute highlights King's life and the impact he had on the world. It includes a reading from "The Negro American: A Documentary History," an audio recording of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream Speech" and his eulogy. test2

Letter from Chester S. Williams to MLK

Monday, May 1, 1967
Indiana (IN), VIETNAM

Mr. Williams, a member of the executive committee of his local branch of the NAACP, expresses his displeasure at NAACP Executive Director Roy Wilkins attacking Dr. King's position on the Vietnam War.

MLK Comments on Jack O'Dell's Alleged Communist Ties

Dr. King attempts to correct the erroneous impressions created by various newspapers alleging Jack O'Dell's connection to "Communist" activities. While Dr. King maintains Mr. O'Dell's strong work performance, the Detroit native will relinquish his role "in order to avoid embarrassment to SCLC."

Letter from John W. Vannorsdall to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, August 1, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

John W. Vannorsdall, Chaplain of Gettysburg College, invites Dr. King to come speak at the college located in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.

Letter from Henry J. Dillon to MLK

Saturday, August 20, 1966
Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL

Henry Dillon, Vice President of Lithographers and Photoengravers International Union, writes Dr. King. He states, "as long as you choose to support the discredited program and philosophy of this Local...I cannot support- or ask my members to support your organization."

Letter from Philip Harnden to MLK

Friday, February 16, 1968
Detroit, MI, Illinois (IL)

After reading Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait," Philip Harnden, a sophomore at Wheaton College, writes Dr. King expressing his newly changed insight on the Negro struggle. Mr. Harnden inquires about Dr. King's nonviolent approach and the black community beginning to abandon nonviolence by adopting more aggressive means to achieve their goals.

Telegram from MLK regarding OEO

Monday, October 30, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King sent this telegram to several members of the House of Representatives urging them to approve a vote on the Office of Economic Opportunity and the War on Poverty.

Letter from Mrs. Samuel Rosen to MLK

Thursday, April 6, 1967
New York, NY, VIETNAM, Montgomery, AL

Mrs. Samuel Rosen writes Dr. King recollecting when she marched with him in Montgomery. Rosen states that she and her husband are proud of Dr. King and his works regarding the Vietnam War.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Robert Goldwin

Wednesday, March 20, 1963
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Dora McDonald informs Dr. Robert A. Goldwin the four essays on "100 Years of Emancipation" have been received and placed on Dr. King's desk for him to read upon his return from out of town.

Letter from Richard C. Gilman to MLK

Tuesday, July 5, 1966
Los Angeles, CA

Richard C. Gilman, President of Occidental College, invites Dr. King to speak to the students at their opening convocation.

Free Southern Theater Requests MLK's Financial Assistance

Tuesday, June 29, 1965
New Orleans, LA, Atlanta, GA

John O'Neal, Executive Director of the Free Southern Theater in New Orleans, requests financial assistance from Dr. King and the SCLC. Mr. O'Neal oversees a professional touring ensemble that performs in six states in the Deep South and a pilot project for a community theater program.

Letter from S.W. McAllister to MLK

New York (NY), Norfolk, VA, Georgia (GA)

Mr. McAllister, a father of three, requests Dr. King's assistance in obtaining a divorce from his wife who is living with another man. Dr. King was an image of hope for many people and often received requests for help in areas unrelated to civil rights.

Minutes of the Council of United Civil Rights Leadership Meeting

Wednesday, March 23, 1966
New York, NY, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

These minutes from the meeting of the Council of United Civil Rights Leadership give a description of the topics discussed. Topics included: meeting with President Johnson, Office of Economic Opportunity memoranda, Inter-organizational conflict and fundraising.