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Articles Regarding Strides Made in the Civil Rights Movement

Atlanta, GA, Cleveland, OH, Chicago, IL, Birmingham, AL, GRENADA, VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This SCLC news bulletin published around 1964, discloses information regarding Dr. King and others staying in the Birmingham jail. Also included are updates on the progress of the Civil Rights Movement in various cities, additions and changes within the SCLC and relationships with familiar and notable personalities.

Letter from David Cassat to MLK

Wednesday, October 26, 1966
New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Mr. Cassat, Treasurer for the National Council of Churches, informs Dr. King about the benefits of the organization's Gift Annuity Program. He also encloses a brochure that outlines the various details of this innovative initiative.

Christ

Dr. King quotes Albert Knudson's thoughts about how the disciples viewed Jesus Christ.

Nobel Peace Prize Acceptance Speech Draft

Thursday, December 10, 1964
Philadelphia, MS, Montgomery, AL, Oslo, Norway, Mississippi (MS), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL)

In 1964, Dr. King became the first African-American to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. At age 35, he was also the youngest recipient of the award to date. Emphasizing a philosophy of nonviolence, Dr. King writes this acceptance speech commemorating the courageous work of the Civil Rights Movement. He highlights the brutality faced throughout the United States and addresses the irony of accepting a peace prize on behalf of a movement that has yet to obtain peace.

Telegram from James S. Symington to MLK

California (CA), Texas (TX), Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Los Angeles, CA

James S. Symington of the U.S. Department of State invites Dr. King to meet with Prime Minister Forbes Burham of Guyana. Symington provides Dr. King with the Prime Minister's itinerary for California and Texas.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Thursday, October 15, 1964
New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

This letter, dated October 15, 1964, was written from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald congratulating him on the Nobel Peace Prize. Daves was in negotiation to place his "I Have a Dream" speech on the National Documents Committee.

Letter from John Maguire to MLK

Tuesday, October 12, 1965
Connecticut (CT)

Mr. John D. Maguire, on behalf of Wesleyan University's Department of Religion, writes to Dr. King inviting him to preach in their chapel.

The Real Poverty

Sunday, December 4, 1966
Alabama (AL)

SCLC Director of Public Relations Junius Griffin announces the opening of the Anti-Poverty Coordinating Committee of the Wilcox County, Alabama branch of the SCLC. Throughout the speech, he asserts that true poverty is a "man without compassion," and that any person who does not know how to help others is worse off than "our ancestors who were slaves."

Letter from Martin Paryer to MLK

Tuesday, August 9, 1966
New York, NY

Martin Paryer wrote Dr. King this letter to respond to his July form letter, stating that he finds Black Power and the violence associated with it to be detrimental to the nonviolent Civil Rights campaign. He further states that poverty is not only a Negro problem, but also a problem of all races.

Letter from MLK to Harry Belafonte

Tuesday, July 23, 1963
Washington, D.C., CANADA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, California (CA), New York (NY)

Dr. King writes Harry Belafonte to discuss the date, time, and occasion for the March on Washington. Dr. King also expresses his desire for Belafonte to be present.

News Release from Congressman John Conyers Jr.

Sunday, October 1, 1967
Washington, D.C., Michigan (MI), Chicago, IL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Congressman John Conyers, Jr. requests that a conference be held including Negro elected officials to support his thirty billion dollar bill to help the nation's ghettos.

Letter from Mrs. Raymond Gautier and Mrs. Robert Joyner to MLK

Wednesday, June 19, 1963
Washington (WA), Alabama (AL), Jackson, MS, Mississippi (MS)

The President and Secretary of a Seattle benefit guild, an organization consisting of twelve Negro women who seek to "promote unity for the improvement of the community," request a meeting with Dr. King. The benefit guild hopes to sponsor a rally to raise funds for the SCLC. Furthermore they describe the Northwest as a silent "nice nasty."

Papal Infallibility

Dr. King defines papal infallibility.

Theology and Science

Dr. King cites Albert Knudson's "The Doctrine of God" as a source on theology and science.

Statistics on Birmingham, Alabama

Birmingham, AL

This sheet shows Negro vs. White Populations in Birmingham, Alabama in regards to voting. It also shows the working wages of the Negro Population according to an article in the Saturday Evening Post.

Telegram from Andrew Young to Moreland Griffith Smith

Thursday, February 25, 1965
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL

Andrew Young informs Moreland Griffith Smith Sr. that he will be unable to attend a meeting in Montgomery, Alabama. Reverend James Bevel will attend the meeting instead.

A Resolution Directed to the African Methodist Episopal Church

Ohio (OH), Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Florida (FL), Cleveland, OH

This resolution endorses the appointment of Donald Jacobs as Bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal Church.

Letter from Beresford Hayward to MLK

Wednesday, February 7, 1962
PUERTO RICO, CUBA, Washington, D.C.

Beresford Hayward, Planning Consultant of the Department of Education in Puerto Rico, writes Dr. King to inform him of the racial climate in Puerto Rico and its issue of Cuban immigration. Mr. Hayward also presents a comparison between the race issues inflicting Puerto Rico and the United States of America.

Letter to Dr. Abernathy Regarding MLK Memorial Service

Washington, D.C., New York (NY)

Dr. Abernathy receives this letter from an anonymous sender suggesting that the SCLC plan a memorial service in commemoration of Dr. King on Emancipation Day. The writer provides a list of music and poems that would be appropriate for the occasion.

Letter from MLK

Texas (TX), CANADA, Alabama (AL), Chicago, IL

Dr. King thanks the supporters of the "Martin Luther King Fund" for their integral role in the effort to end poverty and discrimination.

Flight Schedule for Coretta Scott King and Party

Tuesday, December 1, 1964
Atlanta, GA, London, England, New York, NY, FRANCE, Oslo, Norway, Stockholm, Sweden, DENMARK, Georgia (GA), UNITED KINGDOM, New York (NY)

The Henderson Travel Service provides a detailed schedule of suggested flights for Coretta Scott King and others traveling to witness Dr. King receive the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from MLK Regarding Chicago Movement Efforts, Torn Document

Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

With a future of brotherhood, freedom and harmony among all at the core of the fight for democracy, Dr. King, in this excerpt, stresses the need for support in the fight against injustice.

The World of Books

Saturday, June 17, 1967
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

This is a broad review of Dr. King's publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" The article also notes that this was the first book Dr. King has released since his acceptance of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964.

Letter from Clare Stover to the SCLC

Monday, May 10, 1965
Pennsylvania (PA), Ohio (OH), Alabama (AL), Selma, AL

Mrs. Stover sends the SCLC a copy of a letter she sent to the Hammermill Paper Company following its decision to locate in Alabama. She condemns the company's decision because she feels economic development should be withheld from states that do not uphold federal law. She also questions whether the State of Alabama will be able to honor its promise of tax breaks, which it used to lure Hammermill Paper Company to the state.

Thank You Letter from Dr. King to Chas. E. Elmore

Tuesday, July 30, 1963
Norfolk, VA

This letter dated July 31, 1963 was written by Dr. King to Mrs. Chas Elmore. In it he thanks her for the kind letter she wrote to him about his letter from the Birmingham Jail.

Letter from John S. Horner to Dora McDonald

Monday, October 7, 1963
New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ)

John Horner of Grossman Publishers, Inc. writes Dora McDonald regarding the use of an article by Dr. King in a book they are publishing entitled "Instead of Violence." Horner encloses a pamphlet that includes information about the book, their catalogue and their terms of business.

The Minority Can Afford Adequate Housing

Florida (FL), Michigan (MI)

Mr. Borden writes to inform readers of the housing inequalities in Dade County. Borden ultimately explains that the problem extends from not a singular reason, but from a mixture of social and economic ills. He believes that if the focus was shifted from building expensive commercial buildings to investing in ordinary neighborhoods, there would be significant improvement. This also serves as a call to action for those who agree with the information to mail it to their representatives in Congress.

Letter from Rev. Jesse Jackson to MLK

Thursday, February 23, 1967
Chicago, IL

In an effort to make Operation Breadbasket successful ,the SCLC held seminars to help the negro businessmen develop their businesses. Jackson invites Dr. King and anyone else he wants to bring as an informal resource during the seminar.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. Richard C. Gilman

Wednesday, October 19, 1966
Los Angeles, CA

Dora McDonald informs Dr. Gilman that Dr. King will be able to speak at Occidental College on November 17, 1966.

People to People: Is Non-Violence Doomed to Failure?

Saturday, February 12, 1966
Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King shares his view on the criticism that the nonviolent philosophy in America is disintegrating. Reviewing the historical success of nonviolence, he contends that the "unselfish" element of the movement is what has ensured its victory for all races in the past, and will continue to spur it to victory in the future. He surmises that proponents of nonviolence "shall be able, not only to remove injustice, but to establish in its place freedom and social peace for all Americans."