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Letter from Dolores H. Autuore to MLK

Thursday, September 28, 1967
New York, NY

Mrs. Autuore encloses some checks that were misplaced temporarily while offering her gratitude to Dr. King for his visit to Pine Island.

Telegram from Rev. Andrew J. Young to Mrs. Rosa M. Mcghee

Monday, August 9, 1965
Birmingham, AL, Tennessee (TN)

Rev. Andrew Young sends this telegram to Mrs. Rosa Mcghee apologizing on behalf of the SCLC for neglecting to invite the officials and members of the American Federation of Teachers.

OEO Moves to Aid Hungry Families in Seven States

Wednesday, May 3, 1967
Washington, D.C., Arkansas (AR), Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS), South Carolina (SC), Tennessee (TN)

The Office of Economic Opportunity initiates a new Food Stamp Loan program that will enable impoverished families to purchase "much needed" food.

Telegram from Phil Stovin to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967
Wisconsin (WI)

Mr. Stovin praises Dr. King for his nonviolent approach towards achieving peace.

People in Action: Recognition and Opportunity

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King states there are two basic elements to human rights: recognition and opportunity.

Letter from Rev. E. C. Smith to MLK

Monday, November 26, 1962
Washington, D.C.

Rev. Smith informs Dr. King that the Testimonial Committee has made the assumption that Dr. King is unable to accept their previous invitation, so they have made other arrangements.

Letter from Jean L. Bennett to Dora McDonald

Friday, May 20, 1966
Nevada (NV), Atlanta, GA

Ms. Jean L. Bennett writes to Ms. McDonald regarding the Platters recording of the song "We Ain't What We Was." She believes that the SCLC should adopt this song as an actual theme song for it was inspired by Dr. King. The Platters were a successful vocal group during this time.

Article Written by MLK for The Progressive

INDIA, INDONESIA, GHANA, BRAZIL, Little Rock, AR, Albany, GA, Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Boston, MA

In this unfinished draft of an article for The Progressive, Dr. King writes about the social ills of America through the context of what he calls the two most important documents in American history: the Declaration of Independence and the Emancipation Proclamation.

Financial Document-Receipt from Ramparts Magazine

Wednesday, May 17, 1967
New York, NY

This note references a check sent to Dr. King by Ramparts Magazine for monies received for the use of his Riverside Church Speech.

Letter from MLK to Al Capp

Tuesday, June 30, 1964
Boston, MA, St. Augustine, FL, New York (NY), Massachusetts (MA), Florida (FL)

Dr. King writes Al Capp, formally known as the Cartoonist Alfred Gerald Caplin, acknowledging his previous correspondence. King asserts that his organization deplores violence regardless of race and hopes that Caplin's "current hostility will be overcome, and that he will exercise a deep concern for the welfare of all people of this country."

Worship

Dr. King describes the challenge of the Protestant Church as finding a balance between objective and subjective worship.

Handwritten Notes on Sacramentalism

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on sacramentalism. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definition, and bible verses.

Anonymous letter to MLK

Sunday, June 26, 1966
Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Memphis, TN, Tennessee (TN)

An anonymous individual expresses their concern with the methods and efforts Dr. King is using to achieve his goals through the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Dr. King to anonymous

In a handwritten draft addressed simply to "gentleman," Dr. King expressed gratitude for having received a copy of a study entitled "Civil Disobedience: Morality and the Coming of the Civil War." So impressed with the contents of the book, Dr. King made it available to staff as reference resource.

MLK's Address to the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity

Monday, October 12, 1964
Missouri (MO), INDIA

This address by Dr. King was delivered to the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity the day before it was announced that he had been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. In addressing the topic "Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution," Dr. King argues that the church must inspire it's members to be active and advocate against injustice, reaffirm the misconduct of racial segregation, and work towards social change in a nonviolent and peaceful manner.

Letter from Benjamin Spock to MLK

Monday, February 21, 1966
Cleveland, OH, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Dr. Spock, pediatrician and Vietnam anti-war activist, writes Dr. King to enlist his support for an anti-war effort by joining in a "statement of common concern" with other "key spokesman for major American interests and institutions." He proposes that the group hold a press conference to release the statement with the intention of encouraging collective action against the Vietnam War. Dr. Spock indicates that he would like to hold the press conference on March 7, 1966. Dr. Spock hopes the group can get an audience with President Johnson to discuss their concerns.

Long Beach Dispatch: American Talking Back

California (CA), VIETNAM

In this letter to the editor, Mr. Joseph Holmes uses rhetorical questions and graphic imagery to illustrate respective positions on the Vietnam War.

Letter from Helen Knox to MLK

Thursday, July 13, 1967
California (CA), New York (NY)

Mrs. Knox acknowledges receipt of Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" and briefly discloses details of her involvement in the Civil Rights Movement in Harlem.

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

Friday, December 11, 1964
Oslo, Norway, New York, NY, New York (NY), London, England, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

On December 11, 1964, Dr. King delivered his Nobel lecture at the University of Oslo. Aware of the prestigious nature of the award and the global recognition for the nonviolent struggle to eradicate racial injustice in the U.S., King worked nearly a month on this address. He went far beyond his dream for America and articulated his vision of a World House in which a family of different races, religions, ideas, cultures and interests must learn to live together as brothers and sisters or perish together as fools. For citations, go to Dr. King's lecture at nobleprize.org.

Letter from John B. Morris to Alfred Hardman

Wednesday, July 3, 1963
Atlanta, GA

The Executive Director of the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity writes the Lovett School Board of Trustees regarding the decision not to accept Negroes. Reverend John Morris informs Reverend Alfred Hardman that the church does not agree with the decision and will protest it. Dr. King's son, Martin Luther King III was one of the students not admitted into the school.

Dr.King's letter to Dr. & Mrs.Rousseau

California (CA), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr.King's letter to Dr. & Mrs. Rousseau was about his views on Vietnam. He believed that America's involvement in Vietnam was wrong and that the United States was on the wrong side of peace.

Telegram from Community Leaders to Dr. King

Sunday, October 22, 1967
Washington, D.C.

This telegram is requesting that Dr. King contact certain prominent politicians to urge their support for funding "rent supplements" and "model citizens" programs.

Letter from Keith G. Allen to MLK

Monday, February 26, 1968
Los Angeles, CA, Los Angeles, CA

In this letter, Mr. Allen requests an allocation from the sum of money that was granted to the SCLC from the Ford Foundation.

Telegram from Norwegian Student Association to MLK

NORWAY

The Norwegian Student Association inquires if Dr. King will be available to give a lecture on Human Freedoms.

Pittsburgh Courier: Mays

Saturday, April 29, 1950
Pittsburgh, PA

Dr. Benjamin E. Mays mourns the recent deaths of Charles Drew and Carter Woodson. Both were highly acclaimed individuals, not only because of their race but also in their areas of study. Drew developed large-scale blood banks during WWI and Woodson cultivated the idea of Black History Month.

Letter to William H. Andrews from MLK

Wednesday, July 10, 1963
Detroit, MI, Birmingham, AL, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation for the members of the Georgia Family Circle's contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King explains the inability of the SCLC's continuance of the movement in Birmingham without their "dollars for freedom." He further expounds on the importance of their moral support.

Letter from Howard Moore, Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Albany, GA

Howard Moore, a partner in the Law Offices of Ward, Moore and Alexander, informs Dr. King of the establishment of the Southern Legal Assistance Project (SLAP). Mr. Moore describes how SLAP has already achieved a victory in representing a soldier who was accused of cursing his white officers. He also asks Dr. King to consider being named as an adviser for the project.

Prophet

Dr. King defines prophet.

Speech at Chicago Freedom Movement Rally

Sunday, July 10, 1966
Chicago, IL, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, PUERTO RICO

Dr. King speaks of the urgent need to address issues in the city such as deplorable housing conditions, discrimination in employment, segregation and overcrowded schools. He urges his listeners to commit to fill up the jails if necessary, register every eligible Negro to vote, withhold rent from slumlords, withdraw economic support from companies that don't hire Negroes, and support Negro-owned businesses. He stresses the importance of using nonviolent methods.

Telegram from MLK and Mrs. King to Dr. Benjamin E. Mays

Atlanta, GA, SWITZERLAND, Georgia (GA), Geneva, Switzerland

Dr. and Mrs. King commend Dr. Benjamin E. Mays for all he has accomplished during his twenty-seven years as President of Morehouse College.