Themes

The Archive

Search results for:
"Tallahassee, FL"

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK

Tuesday, March 7, 1967

Theodore Brown, Executive Director of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa, writes Dr. King to invite him to a meeting with members of the British Parliament to discuss the developing racial crisis in their country. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in red ink.

Letter to Men of Morehouse from Morehouse President Benjamin E. Mays

Morehouse President Benjamin E. Mays discusses the events during Centennial Founders Week at Morehouse College for those who were not in attendance. He also informs the Men of Morehouse of the upcoming commencement ceremony.

Telegram from Sylvester Nichols to Mrs. King

Friday, May 3, 1968

Mrs. King received many telegrams, following the assassination of Dr. King. This telegram, in particular, came from Sylvester Nichols and the members of the Brooklyn branch of the National Association of Negro Musicians. The association wanted to extend sympathy to the King family and to inform Mrs. King that they would continue to live out Dr. King's principles.

Urban Strategy Conference and Demonstration Participants

This document lists attendees of the Urban Strategy Conference who also went to a demonstration in Washington, D. C.

Address by Jackie Robinson at SCLC Freedom Dinner

Tuesday, September 25, 1962

Guest speaker Jackie Robinson discusses his personal struggles with adopting the philosophy of nonviolence, race relations and the far-reaching efforts of the SCLC.

Statement Regarding Fred L. Shuttlesworth's Court Appearances

Tuesday, July 12, 1966

This document explains Rev. Shuttlesworth upcoming court appearances as a result of his civil rights activities. He faces charges for blocking a sidewalk during a demonstration and for protesting at Drake Memorial Hospital.

Letter from Jessie Treichler of Antioch College to Coretta Scott King

Thursday, August 16, 1962

On behalf of Antioch College, Jessie Treichler invites Dr. King to speak and Mrs. King to perform at the college. She informs Mrs. King of the honorarium and requests a tentative response.

Stanford University Faculty and Staff Pledge of Civil Disobedience

Friday, May 26, 1967

The Faculty and Staff members of Stanford University make a pledge of civil disobedience to protest the Vietnam conflict. The individuals signing the pledge request members of the clergy and academic community with like sentiments to join them in this demonstration.

Evil - Psalms

Dr. King writes on the subject of evil according to the book of Psalms.

Letter from Gunnar Magnus to MLK Requesting Interview

Tuesday, October 18, 1966

Mr. Magnus, a Norwegian journalists and student at Davidson College in North Carolina, requests Dr. King grant an interview for his paper, the "Morgenbladet".

Letter from Charles Henry to Ralph David Abernathy

Tuesday, April 30, 1968

Mr. Henry chastises Rev. Abernathy for an adverse comment he made towards White people. As a negro, he urges that the only way to get White people to stop name calling names is for Negroes to do the same.

Letter from MLK to the Nobel Institute

Wednesday, January 25, 1967

Dr. King nominates Thich Nhat Hanh, a Buddhist monk from Vietnam, for the Nobel Peace Prize. He describes Hanh's accomplishments and assures that he is "an apostle of peace and non-violence.

Letter from Congressman Augustus F. Hawkins to MLK

Friday, June 11, 1965

Augustus Hawkins, the first black Congressman from California, asks Dr. King to offer suggestions and comments about how to further the aims of the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964. Hawkins reports that the act has garnered resistance from local political leadership because many fear it will undermine their power.

Request to Use "I Have a Dream" Speech in a Musical Composition

Wednesday, September 18, 1963

Classical composer Irwin Heilner requests Dr. King's permission to sample the "I Have a Dream" speech in a musical work. Heilner specifies his plans to send the song to musicians in order to get it published, and outlines the terms of the royalties if it is successful. The notes at the bottom of the letter indicate that Dr. King referred Heilner to attorney Clarence Jones regarding use of the speech.

Letter from Gerald Gotting to MLK

Friday, November 10, 1967

Gerald Gotting writes a letter in German requesting a peaceful end to the Vietnam war.

Index Card - MLK Handwritten Notes

On this notecard, Dr. King focused on the topic, The Kingdom of God. He referenced Cave, author of 'The Christian Way.'

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. Marshall Shepard

Friday, November 17, 1967

Dora McDonald, Secretary to Dr. King, writes Rev. Marshall Shepard, Jr. to accept a speaking invitation at their 8:00 a.m. Sunday Service on behalf of Reverend King.

Discrimination Is a World Wide Issue

Dr. King delivers this address speaking to humanity's failure to offset discrimination. He believes the United States, with all its technological and democratic advances, could stand to learn from the social morality of India, which is considered a "less developed nation." Dr.

Letter from Oakleigh Ross Bush to MLK

Saturday, June 25, 1966

Oakleigh Ross Bush discusses the significance of author Joel Candler Harris with Dr. King. Bush also tells Dr. King about a book of Harris' work, which Bush edited. Bush currently is trying to get the book published, but needs a forward written by "an eminent American Negro" in order for publishers to accept the manuscript.

Letter to Mrs. King from Mrs. Lawrence Greene

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

In this letter, Mrs. Lawrence Greene offers encouragement to Mrs. King. As such she writes, "You have today made yourself a woman among women. In your time of grief you thought not of yourself but of us that cry in the night."

Telegram from Congressman Don Edwards to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

California Democratic Congressman Don Edwards congratulates Dr. King on his April 4th, 1967 speech "Beyond Vietnam," and commends his courage in speaking "so clearly on this vital question."

Telegram from UFT President Albert Shanker to MLK

Wednesday, September 13, 1967

Albert Shanker expresses his appreciation to Dr. King for his support throughout the tumultuous 1967 education crisis in New York City.

Tallahassee's Inter-Civic Council, Inc. Presents MLK

Sunday, April 19, 1964

This document contains a program for Tallahassee's Inter-Civic Council's mass planning meeting for a three-day workshop on nonviolence at Bethel Baptist Church. Also included in this document are lyrics to "Lift Every Voice and Sing," and "We Shall Overcome."

Letter from William Adams to MLK

Tuesday, April 18, 1967

William Adams from the New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary writes Dr. King informing him of political matters in New York City, which may hinder the civil rights efforts of African Americans.

Coretta Scott King's SCLC Contributors Card

This card reminds Mrs. King of her previous year's contribution and solicits her support for another year.

Letter from MLK to Eugene Saunders

Tuesday, April 3, 1962

Dr. King declines an invitation from Eugene Saunders to speak in Virginia for the Central Civic Forum. He refers Mr. Saunders to Jack O'Dell for voter registration literature.

Telegram from MLK to Chris Folker

Dr. King expresses enthusiasm regarding his upcoming trip to Sweden.

Letter from University of King's College to MLK

Monday, February 3, 1964

The University of King's College sends a follow up letter to Dr. King inquiring if he will accept their offer to receive an Honorary Doctorate of Civil Law.

Telegram from Governor Edmund Brown to MLK

Tuesday, March 9, 1965

Governor Brown writes to Dr. King protesting the brutal treatment of Negro citizens in Selma, Alabama.

Letter from William H. Gray, Jr. to Congressman James A. Byrne

Monday, June 5, 1967

Prominent offical and businessman William H. Gray, Jr. writes United States Congressman James Byrne in regards to discrimination issues related to Negro students and the Selective Service System. Gray communicates with Congressman Byrne to intervene in a discriminatory matter involving a young Philadelphia native. Dr. King is forwarded a copy of this correspondence.