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Letter from Unknown to MLK

This letter from an unknown author advises Dr. King to conduct the largest voter registration drive in an effort to elimate poverty. According to the author, "Politicians understand the ballot."

Letter from Hazel Gregory to MLK

Friday, July 19, 1963

Hazel Gregory, on behalf of the Montgomery Improvement Association, asks Dr. King about transportation to the March on Washington. She also commends him on his recent article published in "Ebony." Dr. King was president of the Montgomery Improvement Association from 1955 to 1960. The organization was founded after the arrest of Rosa Parks, which sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. Marshall Shepard

Friday, November 17, 1967

Dora McDonald, Secretary to Dr. King, writes Rev. Marshall Shepard, Jr. to accept a speaking invitation at their 8:00 a.m. Sunday Service on behalf of Reverend King.

Telegram from Mrs. Mary L. Ayler to MLK

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

This telegram is an expression of support and encouragement from Mrs. Ayler of Murphysboro, IL, to Dr. King while he was incarcerated in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from MLK to Arline Young

Thursday, March 22, 1962

Dr. King responds to Ms. Young's previous letter that discussed the difficulty of engaging people in voter registration efforts.

Letter from Robert Way to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

Robert Way, Chairman of the Hadley Executive Committee, writes to correct a misunderstanding regarding restrictions on the contents of a lecture Dr. King is scheduled to deliver. Mr. Way assures Dr. King he has the freedom to express what he feels is important.

Thank You Letter From MLK to Mrs. Helen N. Ceder

Thursday, December 21, 1967

Dr. King expresses appreciation for Mrs. Helen Ceder's contribution to Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He acknowledges that her support assists with many important projects such as voter registration and eradication of ghettos in the North.

SCLC Report of the Director

This document contains a six month SCLC Semi-Annual Report. The SCLC reports on their accomplishments in the areas of social action, fundraising, education, legal defense, etc. This document discusses the Virginia Christian Leadership Conference, the SCLC Leadership Training Program, and the Citizens Voter Registration Drive. Also included is a list of recommendations for the SCLC staff.

Letter from William A. Rutherford to Richard M. Austin

Friday, February 2, 1968

William A. Rutherford, Executive Director of the SCLC, requests that Rev. Austin join a SCLC support committee. The support committee will offer assistance to the SCLC's upcoming campaign in Washington, D.C.

Letter From Philip S. Riggs to MLK

Friday, March 24, 1967

In this letter, Philip Riggs writes to express his difference of opinion with Dr. King regarding the treatment of House Representative Adam Clayton Powell.

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, October 9, 1964

Joan Daves sends Dr. King a royalty statement for "Stride Toward Freedom" and "Strength To Love."

Traditionalism

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman’s “Introduction to Philosophy.”

Letter from Dora McDonald to Eleanor H. Allen

Monday, December 16, 1963

Dora McDonald responds to a letter from Eleanor Allen regarding assisting a church affected by recent bombings. McDonald encloses the address of Reverend John Cross, Pastor of 16th Baptist Church, in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from SNCC Communication Director Horace Julian Bond to MLK

Sunday, May 31, 1964

Horace Bond, writing on behalf of the Council of Federated Organizations, asks Dr. King to join other civil rights organizations in writing a letter to President Johnson to support the organization's bid for a meeting with the President.

Letter from Thelma Larkin to MLK

Tuesday, February 15, 1966

Miss Larkin, a disgruntled landlord, expresses her concern for Dr. King's initiative against slum lords. She feels his war on slum lords is a bit misguided in that it takes responsibility and accountability away from those she calls slum tenants.

Letter from Robert M. Gomsrud to MLK Regarding the Nobel Prize

Thursday, November 12, 1964

In this letter, Robert M. Gomsrud, President of the Minneapolis Central Labor Union Council, congratulates Dr. King for winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

The Nobel Couple

Thursday, December 10, 1964

The cover photo of the December 1964 issue of The American Chronicle captures Dr. and Mrs. King after they discover he was named the winner of the year's Nobel Peace Prize.

Susan Julien Offers Service to MLK

Susan Julien responds to a SCLC circulation letter sent by Dr. King. As a student with no income, Susan offers her service to help further the cause for "democratic change." She has dedicated Saturdays to contribute to the movement and asks if there is a SCLC branch near her home in New York.

Financial Report of SCLC

Friday, May 19, 1967

This document is the SCLC's summary of income and disbursements for the fiscal period of May 15-19, 1967.

Letter from Vernal G. Cave to MLK

Thursday, November 21, 1963

Vernal G. Cave informs Dr. King of a cousin's passing and contributes to the SCLC in his memory.

Letter from Bernard Edelman to MLK

Tuesday, October 24, 1967

Bernard Edelman, a former supporter of Dr. King and the SCLC, expresses his objection to Dr. King's stance on Vietnam.

Telegram from Richard Daley to Dr. King Requesting Meeting

Chicago Mayor Richard Daley invites Dr. King to meet with him and other religious leaders to discuss programs that will improve the quality of life in Chicago.

Exodus

Dr. King wrote these note cards, marked "Class Notes," on Exodus. He focuses on the topics of knowledge, the doctrine of God, sin, ethics, social ethics, and the covenant.

Letter from MLK to Madame Bremond about a Visit to Lyons, France

Wednesday, April 20, 1966

In this letter Dr. King offers his gratitude to Madame Bremond for a pleasurable visit to Lyons, France at which occurred a "great ecumenical gathering."

Draft of Address at the Fourth Constitutional Convention of the AFL-CIO

In this address to the AFL-CIO, Dr. King compares the labor and civil rights movements. He argues that those who are anti-labor are also likely anti-civil rights. Thus, the Negro understands the labor movement and shares the same enemies. Dr. King also predicts that the coming years will be trying ones for laborers due to the automation of work processes, stating that "automation will grind jobs into dust." Dr. King urges the labor movement to strengthen itself by embracing the Negro people.

Letter from Roland Smith to MLK

Thursday, February 9, 1956

Roland Smith requests that Dr. King prepare a list of themes for the Baptist Training Union. Smith encloses a copy of themes from the previous year for Dr. King to use as a template.

Letter from John Maguire to MLK

Tuesday, October 12, 1965

Mr. John D. Maguire, on behalf of Wesleyan University's Department of Religion, writes to Dr. King inviting him to preach in their chapel.

Man (His Split Personality)

Dr. King quotes St. Augustine’s “Confessions.”

The Free Southern Theater

The Free Southern Theater was co-founded by members of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. They toured throughout the South, performing free of charge in Negro communities that had no theater, as a cultural and education extension of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Elliot J. Groszek to MLK

Elliot Groszek sends his support to Dr. King after hearing his speech in which he proposed that President Johnson sponsor a program for employment. Groszek finds King to be a revo-lutionary leader and would like for him to run for President of the United States.