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News from the AFL-CIO: Labor News Conference

AFL-CIO's public affairs program, the Labor News Conference. Donald Slaiman, Director of the AFL-CIO's Department of Civil Rights was questioned by Alan Adams of Business Week Magazine and Stanley Leward of Scripps-Howard Newspapers. The three have a discussion about apprenticeship opportunities for minority youths, particularly of Negro and Puerto Rican heritage.

Fundraising Letter - SCEF/James A. Dombrowski 12/25/59

Friday, December 25, 1959

The head of the Southern Conference Educational Fund (SCEF) sent out this fundraising appeal to a former donor in 1959. The appeal focuses on fundraising efforts for Southern children with the intent of promoting love and increasing equal educational standards for children of all races.

Letter from Mrs. Ruth Spencer to MLK

Sunday, August 27, 1967

Mrs. Spencer shares her belief that "the Negro problem and the Vietnamese War are part of the same problem," though often concealed by news media propaganda. She expresses her gratitude towards Dr. King for his nonviolent philosophy and offers her financial support.

Anti-Poverty Bill

Tuesday, August 9, 1966

This document outlines and provides the status of the Anti-Poverty legislation in Congress.

Letter from Josephine Baker to MLK

Saturday, August 31, 1963

Josephine Baker expresses her admiration for Dr. King as a great leader and articulates her commitment to the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Frank McRedmond to MLK

Wednesday, February 7, 1968

Frank McRedmond suggests that Dr. King consider using the term "the economic defenseless" rather than "the poor," in order to gain support from the white community.

Statement Before the National Democratic Platform and Resolutions Committee

Saturday, August 11, 1956

Dr. King addresses the National Democratic Platform and Resolutions Committee. He calls for strong federal action in the South to prevent violence and to uphold the decisions of the Supreme Court pertaining to the end of segregation.

Letter from MLK to H. A. Cruse

Wednesday, February 9, 1966

Dr. King extends support to H. A. Cruse, an individual whose constitutional rights were violated. Dr. King emphasizes that it is not just Negroes who have been "subjected to victimization resulting from failure of Southern law enforcement authorities to follow constitutional practices."

God Pronounces Judgement of America

Sunday, December 25, 1966

God Pronounces Judgment of America is allegedly a prophecy from God, through his servant Reverend R. G. Hardy, given on Christmas Day 1966. It reveals that a horrible earthquake and war are in the future.

Eisenhower - Views on the Racial Question

Dr. King notes General Dwight D. Eisenhower's justification of racial segregation during Eisenhower's 1948 testimony before a Senate subcommittee.

How My Mind has Changed in the Last Decade

Dr. King writes notes on how his mind has changed in recent years. King states that while his main focus was on theology and philosophy, he also focused on social ethics. According to Dr. King, segregation is a tool that exploits the Negro and poor whites. He saw similarities with the liberation of India's people from Britain and asserts that his trip to India cultivated his ideologies on nonviolence.

Letter to Coretta Scott King from Diana Melendez

Friday, April 5, 1968

Diana Melendez, a student at New York City's M.E.S. 146, wrote this letter to Coretta Scott King following a school assembly that announced the death of Dr. King. Melendez offers her condolences and writes that Mrs. King was truly lucky, as she "married a brave man."

Letter from Marsh Clark to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, December 18, 1963

Acting Bureau Chief of Time Magazine, Marsh Clark encloses a Christmas gift for Dr. King's secretary Dora McDonald. Clark jokingly requests that Dr. King not have plane layovers in small towns with weird names.

Letter from MLK to Susan Rowland

Tuesday, November 7, 1967

Dr. King informs Susan Roland, a member of the Student Christian Movement at the University of Western Ontario, that due to numerous commitments, he will be unable to accept the invitation to speak at the institution.

Telegram from Delmer Brown to MLK

Friday, February 5, 1965

Due to recent student activities at the University of California, Berkeley, Mr. Brown requests Dr. King's involvement in a lecture series devoted to discussing issues concerning civil disobedience.

Letter from Sylvia Walters to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

Sylvia Walter writes Dr. King commending him on his strong statements and expresses that he has given many the strength to continue in fight for civil rights and peace.

Letter from the McKeesport, Pennsylvania NAACP to MLK

Wednesday, March 21, 1962

The McKeesport Branch of the NAACP invites Dr. King to be the guest speaker at its upcoming Human Rights Dinner.

Telegram to MLK from the Dogwood Tree

Tuesday, May 2, 1967

Dr. King receives a telegram of support from "The Dogwood Tree." The telegram conveys that "the orthodox Jewish religion is working for you. Keep your faith...."

Last Page of Riverside Speech

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

This document is the last page of Dr. King's Riverside Speech, the only page of this version of the speech in the collection. The speech ends with a quotation from James Russell Lowell's "Once to Every Nation."

MLK's Itinerary October-November 1958

Dated 1958, this calendar lists a number of speaking engagements throughout the country scheduled for Dr. King.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Geraldine Fones

Friday, January 12, 1968

Ms. McDonald informs Ms. Fones that Dr. King will not be able to speak to the Oxford Union Society in London due to commitments in the United States around the same time frame.

Telegram from Unius Griffin to MLK

Unius Griffin writes to Dr. King regarding four Negro political candidates seeking elective offices in Wilcox County, Alabama. Griffin includes information on the increasing numbers of registered Negro voters and speaks to the various intents of each Negro candidate.

Letter from MLK to Glenn Greenwood

Wednesday, October 23, 1963

Dr. King responds to Glenn Greenwood's letter thanking him for his suggestion regarding the Pentagon directive "in relation to Armed Forces personnel participation in civil rights demonstrations."

"In a Word-Now" by MLK

Sunday, September 29, 1963

In the attainment of civil rights, Dr. King stresses the importance and urgency of "NOW". He further expounds on the immediate and effective actions that should be exercised by the Federal government to better the society.

Telegram from MLK to President Lyndon B. Johnson

Dr. King urges President Lyndon B. Johnson to conduct a full investigation concerning the government's involvement with Medgar Evers' suspected murderer.

Letter from Jerome Karlin to MLK

Wednesday, November 28, 1962

Jerome B. Karlin expresses his admiration for Dr. King's dedication to the Civil Rights Movement. Mr. Karlin highlights the importance of Dr. King's ideals and the continuation of the fight for social justice.

Harper & Row, Publishers, Book Format Instructions

This document contains instructions for the proper format of one of Dr. King's books.

Letter from Letitia Baldrige to MLK

Tuesday, February 5, 1963

Letitia Baldridge, Social Secretary for the White House, informs Dr. and Mrs. King of changes related to a reception with President Kennedy.

Letter from Moreland Griffith Smith to MLK

Wednesday, February 17, 1965

Moreland Griffith Smith, Chairman of the Alabama Advisory Committee, invites Dr. King or a representative to an open meeting which will be held in Alabama. The purpose of the meeting is to gather information regarding equal protection under the law in areas such as housing, voting, and employment.

Letter from R. Elliot to Dora McDonald

Thursday, March 14, 1968

In this response letter, R. Elliot thanks Dora McDonald for her response to his inquiry regarding the redevelopment of Ebenezer Baptist Church.