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Letter of Appreciation to MLK from Mrs. A.M.Digilio

Friday, July 30, 1965

In this letter, Mrs. A.M. Digilio writes to Dr. King. Along with her expressions of appreciation, she admits to being one of the millions of whites who have "prayerfully" followed Dr. King's work. Mrs. Digilio states that Dr. King has been a voice to those of the "inarticulate working class", both white and black. She speaks of the unfortunate decline of morality amongst Americans and the necessary Christian might to rectify it. Mrs. Digilio further compares Dr.

The Martin Luther King Column - No. 3

In this column, Dr. King speaks of the outbreak of "Nazi-like degeneracy" less than 15 years after the Holocaust. He says that in spite of these evils, it should not discourage us from coming together as human beings, living in harmony and not letting the dangers of racism paralyze us as a world community.

Transcendence and Immanence of God

Dr. King quotes Jeremiah 23:23, and he provides his interpretation of the biblical passage.

SCLC Newsletter: March-April 1966

This is an example of one of many SCLC Newsletters printed for public distribution. In this third volume, topics include: Bloody Sunday, Dr. King Thanks Sweden, Man with a Plan, Abernathy Tells Hawaii of Brotherhood, and several others.

Letter to MLK from Eugene Exman of Harper & Brothers, Feb. 15, 1962

Thursday, February 15, 1962

Eugene Exman, of Harper & Brothers, addressed this letter to Dr. King informing him that his first book, "STRIDE TOWARD FREEDOM" was chosen as one of 500 books in President Kennedy's collection at the White House. The decision, regarding Dr. King's book was made by the American Booksellers Association. Mr. Exman, lastly, inquired about Dr. King's progress on a manuscript for his second book.

Letter from Episcopal Churchmen for South Africa to MLK

Tuesday, May 26, 1959

This fundraising letter and accompanying bulletin describes the plight of South African non-whites brought on by apartheid and economic disparities. The Episcopal Churchmen for South Africa requests donations and support for the work of the Diocese of Johannesburg.

Advertising and Promotion Expenditures

Tuesday, September 17, 1963

This is a copy of the advertising and promotion expenditures for Dr. King's book, "Strength To Love".

Letter from Courtland Cox to MLK

Wednesday, September 23, 1964

Courtland Cox of SNCC writes Dr. King reminding him that several of their members are away in Africa and informs him that Mr. Lewis will not be able to attend his convention.

SCLC Flyer: Going Out of Business

The Fort Worth chapter of the SCLC issued this flyer advising its fellow Negro residents to boycott Bill Sodd's Meat Store because of discrimination.

Letter from Rev. R.T. Eissfeldt to University of Illinois President Dr. David D. Henry

Thursday, January 28, 1965

Rev. R.T. Eissfeldt thanks Dr. David Henry, President of the University of Illinois, for forwarding to him Dr. King's letter pertaining to the SCLC's summer project.


Dr. King quotes a statement from Jacques Maritain's "True Harmonism" regarding communism. Jacques Maritain was a famous French Catholic philosopher.

A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart

"A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart" by Dr. King discusses the importance of creating a synthesis of opposites and characteristics of one engaged in shrewd thinking with a loving spirit.

Nomination Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to Dr. King

Tuesday, September 10, 1963

In this letter, Benjamin E. Mays notifies Dr. King that he has nominated him for the Florina Lasker Civil Liberties Award.

Letter from Ken Pardue to MLK

Monday, March 18, 1968

Ken Pardue, the Election Commission Chairman of the Student Association at West Texas University, invites Dr. King to be a guest speaker at Choice '68, a program conducted by Time magazine.

Telegram from MLK to US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach

Dr. King writes US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach to inform him of the reports of "known election irregularities" he is receiving concerning the next day's Georgia Democratic primary election.

J.H. Emms to MLK

J.H. Emms offers his approval and support to Dr. King regarding his position on Civil Rights and the Vietnam problem, which were expressed at speeches in Los Angeles and New York.

Invitation from Harper & Row, Publishers

Monday, February 25, 1963

In this letter Harper & Row publishers are requesting Dr. King's presence at a seminar for clergymen, theologians, and laymen. The seminar will discuss how the ministry is affected by cultural changes in society. It will be a weekend retreat and Harper & Row are willing to assume all travel expenses.

MLK Sermon: Non-Conformist

Sunday, January 16, 1966

Dr. King delivers this sermon at Ebenezer Baptist church in Atlanta, Georgia. He references the statement Representative Julian Bond made regarding the Vietnam War and discusses the responsibility of Christians to be morally noble instead of socially respectable. He references multiple biblical figures and explains the importance of not conforming to society.

We Shall Overcome

Tuesday, September 24, 1963

This program serves as a memorial exercise for Addie Mae Collins, Denise McNair, Carol Robertson and Cynthia Wesley.

MLK Flyer: "Integrated Bus Suggestions"

Wednesday, December 19, 1956

In this document, Dr. King and the Reverend W.J. Powell list under "The Montgomery Improvement Association" guidelines to mitigate potential conflicts in the transition to integrated buses. The principle of nonviolence is present throughout the document.

Paul's Letter to American Christians Notes

These notes are in reference to a sermon given by Dr. King. The sermon, "Paul's Letter to American Christians," was included in the publishing of Dr. King's second book. Following the popularity of his first narrative, "Stride Toward Freedom," Dr. King was asked to compile some of his sermons into a book entitled "Strength to Love."

Letter from Angilcan Students' Federation to MLK

Tuesday, August 17, 1965

Stephen Hayes, of the National Union of South African Students, invites Dr. King to speak at their open national congress. The subject of discussion is "The Role of the Christian Student in the Struggle for Social Justice." Hayes does fear that the South African government might refuse to grant Dr. King a visa if he accepts the invitation.

SCLC News Release

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference issues a new release stating Dr. King's demands that the Department of Justice act immediately to halt brutal treatment and intimidation of Negro school children and parents in the State of Mississippi. Dr. King cites several violent and near violent incidents that have occurred in Mississippi during the month of October.

Ben Shahn on Human Rights

The following brochure advertises the contents associated with the Frederick Douglass Institute of Negro Arts and History located in Washington, D.C. This particular exhibition sponsored by Ben Shahn highlights the subject of human rights. The brochure contains sketches of Gandhi and Dr. King.

Servetus, Michael

Dr. King writes biographical notes about Michael Servetus, a citizen of Spain known for his study of medicine and theology. Servetus was burned at the stake because of his anti-Trinitarian views.

Letter from Tony Edwards to MLK

Thursday, December 24, 1964

Fourteen-year-old Tony Edwards writes Dr. King to ask for an autograph to add to his collection. He also thanks Dr. King "for making the Civil Rights Bill possible."

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to Uvee Arbouin

Dr. and Mrs. King write Uvee Arbouin to commend her Christian leadership and devotion to Jesus Christ.

Letter from Ned French to MLK

Monday, March 25, 1968

A high school student requests the political opinions of several famous individuals concerning the national issues and potential candidates of the 1968 presidential election.

Letter from Hugh Bingham to MLK

Friday, April 22, 1966

Hugh Bingham, Associate Editor of the London Daily Mirror, requests help planning his trip to the United States to report on the "progress and processes of integration." He explains that, in addition to the political aspects of integration, he would also like to write about the people involved in the movement.


Dr. King quotes from Edgar S. Brightman's "Philosophy of Religion."