The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:

Man (A Fatalistic View)

Dr. King includes a quote from the Persian philosopher Omar Khayyam.

Letter from W. Russell Smith to MLK

Tuesday, September 26, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

On behalf of the Interfraternity Council of Lehigh University, W. Russell Smith invites Dr. King to present his views on civil rights.

Newsmakers Interview with MLK

Saturday, July 10, 1965
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, VIETNAM, Alabama (AL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Virginia (VA), Selma, AL, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA)

Los Angeles' Channel 2 interviews Dr. King for its Newsmakers program. Topics include King's call for a negotiated settlement in Vietnam and the resulting criticism by other civil rights leaders, plans for mass demonstrations in Los Angeles on the poverty bill, King's position on the armed group called the Deacons and his commitment to nonviolence, and how he responds to the personal threats on his life.

Letter from T. Z. Riggins to MLK

Sunday, July 26, 1964
Washington (WA)

T. Z. Riggins writes Dr. King a thoughtful letter commending his leadership and the influence he brings to America. Aside from Abraham Lincoln, Riggins views Dr. King as the only leader who can bring people together. Riggins believes that Dr. King's job was assigned to him by God and expresses his pride that Dr. King was chosen to "lay the foundation" for the US.

Letter from H. D. Everett to Dr. King

Tuesday, February 6, 1968
Montgomery, AL

A proposition letter expressing an economic idea to establish business enterprises owned and operated by negroes.

Letter from James H. Meredith to MLK

Saturday, October 17, 1964

James Meredith writes from Nigeria to congratulate Dr. King on receiving the Noble Peace Prize and emphasizes that the struggle for human rights is a world-wide struggle. Meredith, the first African-American student to attend the University of Mississippi, was at that time a post-graduate researcher in Nigeria.

People to People: A Choice and a Promise

Saturday, November 21, 1964
Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), Virginia (VA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King addresses the idea that American people of all races have a choice to make this nation a great society.


This series of note cards addresses psychology through the means of human unity. The concept of human unity is indicated by the presence of the body and the soul working in conjunction to inform the human experience. Dr. King references the views of St. Augustine and St. Thomas as it pertains to "the close union between body and soul."


Dr. King quotes Tertullian on the subject of love from “Adversus Marcionem.”

The Mainichi Newspaper to MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967
Washington, D.C., JAPAN

Aoki Shigeru, General Manager of The Mainichi Newspaper's Washington Bureau, requests an interview with Dr. King regarding the ending of the Vietnam War.

Telegram from Dorothy Height to MLK

Saturday, December 5, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY

Dorothy Height, President of the National Council of Negro Women, sends Dr. King well wishes.

Letter from Christena Miscall to MLK

Monday, March 20, 1961
Maine (ME)

Christena Miscall, member of the Student Government Association at Saint Joseph's College, writes Dr. King requesting him to send a personal article for her college's famous persons' auction.

Notecard Written by MLK Regarding "Horace Bushnell"

This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from MLK to Nelson A. Rockefeller

Monday, November 1, 1965
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King thanks Governor Nelson Rockefeller for taking the pulpit at Ebenezer Baptist Church for their Men?s Day Observance. He appreciates the Governor?s contribution of $25,000 to their tax exempt Society to match his own donation from the Nobel Peace Award.

Last Page of Riverside Speech

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

This document is the last page of Dr. King's Riverside Speech, the only page of this version of the speech in the collection. The speech ends with a quotation from James Russell Lowell's "Once to Every Nation."

Telegram from Gitta Gossmann to MLK

Wednesday, March 24, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY

Gossmann sends Dr. King a royalty check for his book "Why We Can't Wait" in the amount of $3,448.76.

Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Report

New York (NY), Arizona (AZ), Atlanta, GA

This report details a statistical count of Jewish communities being discriminated against according to a market research that was conducted by the Office of Economic Opportunity.

Where Do We Go From Here Book Mailing

The people listed here received an advance copy of Dr. King's "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community," which was published in 1967.

Letter from Thomas M. Ward to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1962
Kentucky (KY), Louisville, KY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Louisiana (LA), Shreveport, LA

Thomas M. Ward, Assistant to the Minister of Calvin Presbyterian Church, requests that Dr. King provide documentation to defend against allegations of being a Communist or Communist sympathizer.

Jesus Christ

Dr. King references theological literature regarding the development of Christianity.

Letter from MLK to Corine Jenkins About Prayer

Tuesday, February 27, 1968
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA)

In this letter, Dr. King replies to Corine Jenkins regarding her missing daughter. He informs her that she and her daughter are in his prayers.

Images from a Shot Sheet by Victor Summa

Chicago, IL

This piece vividly describes a poet's conception of an urban "Negro" scene. The poetic imagery paints a picture of a dilapidated neighborhood occupied by impoverished, helpless neighbors and drunkards who undergo tremendous emotional struggle. Dr. King's handwriting at the top of the poem indicates that he wanted this document filed.

Letter to MLK from C. Linski

Tuesday, February 15, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

This letter from Mr. C. Linski, invites Dr. King to work on the project for a shopping mall in Calumet City IL. The goal would be for the shops to hire 50% Negroes through the "Operation Employment for Negroes".

People in Action: Our New President

Saturday, February 1, 1964
New York (NY)

In this article in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King writes optimistically about the prospects for civil rights in the transition from President Kennedy to President Johnson. He believes that Johnson's Southern-ness may disarm the likes of George Wallace and that the President's proven commitment to civil rights and skills as Majority Leader in the Senate will aid in passing legislation.

Letter of Condolence to Mrs. King from Deborah Easton

Friday, April 5, 1968

This handwritten letter of condolence was composed the day after Dr. King's assassination by a young student, Deborah Easton.

Letter from Gitta Badeker to Dora McDonald Regarding "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Tuesday, July 11, 1967
New York, NY

In this letter Badeker writes to McDonald about the advancement from Gummessons Bokforlag for "Where Do We Go From Here."

"Attorney's Arrest is Protested"

Thursday, August 18, 1966
Washington, D.C., Texas (TX), New York (NY), San Francisco, CA

This Washington Post article, entitled "Attorney's Arrest is Protested", talks about Arthur Kinoy's arrest and the complications that aroused as a result of it.

Letter from the United Nations to SCLC

Friday, January 26, 1968
SOUTH AFRICA, New York (NY), New York, NY

The United Nations Special Committee on the Policies of Apartheid of the Government of the Republic of South Africa, requests information regarding activities planned and undertaken by the SCLC against apartheid.

Schleiermacher (Christology)

Dr. King outlines an excerpt from the author Schleiermacher in referencing an idea of Christ.

Letter from Bent Ostergaard to MLK

Tuesday, April 20, 1965

Bent Ostergaard, a member of Amnesty International, informs Dr. King that his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize served as a great pleasure for the Danish people. The Danish section of Amnesty International requests Dr. King's appearance during his travel to Europe. Mr. Ostergaard notifies Dr. King that his expenses will be covered and they would like to give him a tour of the public institutions in Denmark.