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Letter from MLK to Brothers-in-Christ

Friday, February 28, 1964
Ohio (OH)

Dr. King requests the participation of those receiving the letter. He encourages members of congregations to attend the Freedom Rally and urges churches to partake in Freedom Sunday.

Recommendation Letter from MLK for Harcourt Klinefelter

Monday, December 5, 1966
London, England, New Jersey (NJ)

Dr. King writes a letter of recommendation for Harcourt Klinefelter, a friend and partner in the fight for justice and human rights.

The Nation: Hammer of Civil Rights

Monday, March 9, 1964
Birmingham, AL, Jackson, MS

This article by Dr. King appeared in the March 9, 1964, edition of The Nation. Dr. King discusses the impetus for the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Kennedy and Johnson Administrations' commitment to the cause. Recognizing the complexity of such a political movement, King lauds the President Johnson for fighting off attempts to weaken the bill. King also recognizes the achievements of the Fair Employment Committee, established by President Kennedy and headed by then-Vice President Johnson, in providing employment opportunities for many southern Negroes.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom Event Program

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C.

This program outlines the events for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom rally at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D. C.

Sin

Dr. King references the Old Testament biblical book of Leviticus regarding the topic of sin.

Letter from Kent Bach to MLK

Wednesday, May 17, 1967
VIETNAM, Berkeley, CA

In this letter Kent Bach requests Dr. King's endorsement of "Lights On For Peace." Kent Bach plans to run a full-page ad in the New York Times expressing his objection to America's military involvement in Vietnam.

God

Dr. King quotes Blaise Pascal's statement that there is no "medium point" as it relates to God.

A Country Called Corporate America

Sunday, July 3, 1966
New York (NY), California (CA), Illinois (IL), Pennsylvania (PA), Texas (TX), Ohio (OH)

New York Times Magazine writer Andrew Hacker writes about the growing problems caused by the "bigness" of corporate America. He says that large corporations are beginning to have so much power that they can damage the society without having to account for the consequences, as "corporate wealth buys corporate wishes." Some of the ways that they effect society are through their advertisements, their control of the labor market and education.

The Commercial Appeal: But No Services

Sunday, January 7, 1968
Memphis, TN, Virginia (VA)

This photo and accompanying caption relate the story of Dr. King and an associate clerical organization conducting a silent vigil at Arlington National Cemetery after being blocked judicially from holding a memorial service in that venue.

Letter to M.C. Gettinger Regarding Hosea Williams

Atlanta, GA

Dr. King expresses his regret concerning a remark made by Mr. Hosea Williams which Mr. Gettinger perceived as Anti-Semitic, during Mr. Williams' address to Spelman College.

Telegram from Ralph Abernathy to John F. Kennedy

Thursday, June 13, 1963
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C.

Rev. Ralph Abernathy accepts President John F. Kennedy’s invitation to meet and discuss the civil rights problem.

A Look To The Future

Monday, September 2, 1957
Tennessee (TN), EGYPT, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

For the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Highlander Folk School, Dr. King delivers the speech "A Look To The Future." He uses a timeline to explain the adversities African Americans endured to gain recognition as American citizens. He also points out the efforts of the Ku Klux Klan and the White Citizens Councils to make African Americans second class citizens. Lastly, Dr. King points out that America should be more maladjusted in order to avoid failing to cope with the demands of the normal social environment.

Letter from E. Douglas to MLK

Wednesday, August 10, 1966
California (CA)

E. Douglas takes pride in a $60 contribution to the SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Frank Church

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Frank Church, a United States Senator from Idaho, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter From Vice President Johnson to MLK

Friday, April 27, 1962
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson wrote this note to Dr. King to respectfully decline his invitation to a luncheon and to serve on the board of directors of the Gandhi Society for Human Rights. He states he enjoyed their last meeting and is looking forward to the next one.

Telegram from Clarence Brinson and Herman T. Osborne to James Meredith and MLK

Sunday, June 26, 1966
Jackson, MS, Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), New York, NY

Clarence Brinson and Herman T. Osborne salute James Meredith and Dr. King for their service and dedication to the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter of Thanks from MLK to Professor & Mrs. De Branges

Monday, February 27, 1967
Indiana (IN)

In this letter, Dr. King expressed appreciation to Professor and Mrs. Louis De Branges for a generous contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Paul Shields to MLK

Wednesday, June 16, 1965
Atlanta, GA

Paul Shields, the News Director of CBS Television in Atlanta, writes to Dr. King to lodge a complaint against the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's press department. He states that press conferences convened by the SCLC rarely begin on time.

Anonymous Telegram to President Johnson

Tuesday, October 31, 1967
Washington, D.C., Missouri (MO)

This telegram, intended for the White House, was sent regarding the treatment of a former African American Secret Service agent, Abraham Bolden, at the federal medical center in Springfield, Missouri. The sender states that President Johnson ought to follow the United States Constitution and restore Mr. Bolden's freedom or face consequences.

Letter from Wyatt T. Walker to Ella

Wednesday, July 22, 1959
Atlanta, GA

Reverend Wyatt Tee Walker provides his appraisal regarding an earlier proposal by Spelman College to create an Institute on Nonviolence. Walker addresses the letter to Ella describing several categories of interest pertaining to the organization of this event.

Letter from William W. Stafford to MLK

Thursday, April 13, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

William Stafford expresses admiration, gratitude and support for Dr. King's work with the Civil Rights Movement and his stand against the Vietnam War.

Seasons Greetings from Roy Hamilton to MLK

Saturday, December 14, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY

Roy Hamilton writes Dr. King to send Seasons Greetings to him and his family.

Letter from Bayard Rustin to MLK

Friday, July 7, 1967
Cleveland, OH

Bayard Rustin informs Dr. King that Sydney Vincent, the Executive Director of the Jewish Community Federation of Cleveland, would like to gather the major Jewish organizational leaders to discuss Dr. King's work in Cleveland, Ohio.

Letter from Paul H. Douglas to MLK

Thursday, July 2, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Paul H. Douglass extends his gratitude to Dr. King, Roy Wilkins and their followers for the "passage of the Civil Rights Bill."

Letter from Alma Weil to MLK

Thursday, August 11, 1966
Brooklyn, NY, Colorado (CO)

Alma Weil expresses deep intolerance for prejudice and further discloses a desire to support Dr. King's efforts.

My Trip to the Land of Gandhi

INDIA, Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), GHANA, New York (NY), New York, NY, FRANCE, New Delhi, India, SWITZERLAND, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Little Rock, AR, Arkansas (AR)

Dr. King documents his travel throughout India beginning in February 1959 with his wife and Dr. Lawrence Reddick. During his stay Dr. King reflects on the manifestation of Gandhi's nonviolent teachings in low crime rates amidst the impoverished living conditions. Dr. King also addresses the notion of a "divided India," a country deliberating the varying effects of Western modernization.

Letter from Peare E. Hardney to MLK

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C.

Peare E. Hardney, a postal employee in Chicago, reports to Dr. King that her supervisor assaulted her and that African-Americans do not get fair treatment in Chicago. Furthermore, she would like to share her story with someone on Dr. King's staff.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to Rev. Samuel B. McKinney

Cleveland, OH, Ohio (OH)

Dr. and Mrs. King express their condolences for the passing of Reverend Samuel B. McKinney's mother.

Letter from John Edgar Hoover to MLK

Monday, March 29, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL)

FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover thanks Dr. King for his telegram concerning FBI agents in Alabama.

Humanism

Dr. King discusses the weakness of "non theistic humanism."