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Letter from Raphael Gould to Coretta Scott King

Mr. Gould of the Fellowship of Reconciliation sends Mrs. King a compilation of writings about and by Phan Thi Mai, a Vietnamese student who self-immolated on May 16, 1967 in an appeal to end the war in Vietnam. Mai "decided to burn herself to make her voice heard by the war."

Letter from Dr. John Halsey to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1963

Dr. James Halsey of the University of Bridgeport expresses gratitude for Dr. King's contribution to the Alumni Average Gift Improvement Matching Plan.

U.S. Vice Presidential Address

Friday, June 24, 1955

These Excerpts from a Vice Presidential address made on June 24, 1955 boast the claim of moving all Americans closer to achieving the American Dream regardless of race, creed or color. The vice President lists five reasons for the success of the Eisenhower Administration in emproving equal opportunities for all Americans, including Negroes.

Letter from Rene Golcochen to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Rene Golcochen offers condolences to Mrs. King following the death of Dr. King.

Letter from Dr. Alvaro Palmeira to MLK

Monday, November 16, 1964

Dr. Palmeira, Grand Master of the Grande Orient of Brazil, offers his congratulations to Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

The Bible

Dr. King records notes regarding Protestant Orthodoxy and its great error in dealing with the Bible.

Letter from Robert J. McCracken to MLK

Tuesday, February 4, 1964

Rev. McCracken, of Riverside Church in New York, informs Dr. King that he is scheduled to speak at two identical church services. The Church has added the second service because the New York World?s Fair will be open.

Letter from MLK to Joyce Armstrong

Thursday, November 7, 1963

Dr. King responds to Joyce Armstrong, a student at Central High School, regarding her concerns on equality. Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation and states, "it is gratifying to us to know that so many young people are dedicated to the cause of Freedom."

Southern Christian Leadership Conference Resolution

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference issues a resolution urging all religious institutions to encourage their members to vote in the local, state and national elections of 1964.

Letter from Bryan Fulks to MLK

Tuesday, March 20, 1962

Bryan Fulks writes Dr. King expressing appreciation for his diligent work during the fight for social justice and human dignity. Fulks also mentions how elated he was when the editor of the "London Humanist" chose to enrich his article including a pictorial illustration of Dr. King riding through the southern region of the United States.

Relationship of State Units to the National Office

This document outlines the relationship between the national office of the SCLC and state level institutions, referred to as "State Units."

Why Integration Won't Slow Up

Tuesday, November 20, 1962

This article featured in the St. Louis Post Dispatch is an extract from Dr. King's address at Cornell College. Dr. King discusses three attitudes that can be taken toward the question of progress in race relations: extreme optimism, extreme pessimism and the realistic position.

Letter from Judy Grey to MLK

Thursday, June 27, 1963

Judy Grey, a student at Tennessee Polytechnic Institute, informs Dr. King of a paper she is required to complete regarding an issue in the South and requests that he provide any information concerning the movement in the South.

Star: "An Analysis of Black Power" 1967

Monday, June 26, 1967

Paul Hathaway, of the Washington, D.C. Star newspaper, crafted a review of Dr. King's final publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" This extensive review of Dr. King's book focused, primarily, on his stance regarding the black power movement. According, to Dr. King, in the book, black power was something that was needed to achieve tangible goals such as: economic and political power. However, the use of the slogan carried a very volatile meaning that would alienate many allies in the movement, not of African American descent.

Worship

Dr. King references William Ernest Hocking and James Bissett Pratt regarding religious worship.

Letter from MLK to Bernard Goldstein

Monday, September 9, 1963

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Bernard Goldstein for her contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King explains the importance of her contribution and how it helps in their fight for equality.

Letter from George Y. Sodowick to MLK

Saturday, February 10, 1968

George Sodowick expresses to Dr. King disapproval of the planned Poor Peoples Campaign of 1968. Sodowick suggests that, instead of occupying Washington, the demonstrators should settle in and enhance "riot torn cities."

Membership Director's Report to CORE Convention

In this report to the members of CORE, Mr. Robinson outlines the goals for acquiring new contributing associate members and keeping the members they have. It is also concerned with increasing the amount of the donations. The report specifically focuses on membership maintenance, recruitment, growth and the impact of holiday cards.

What Do You Believe About Fair Housing?

This brochure was provided to the public to dispell the myths and solidify the facts of the fair housing market.

Letter from MLK to F. A. Bussey

Friday, March 23, 1962

Dr. King informs the National Morehouse College Alumni President that he will be unable to meet with a group of Morehouse men following his address at Howard University. His schedule is too hectic even though he would enjoy the "hours of fellowship."

Letter from Don Hill to MLK

Tuesday, March 5, 1963

Don Hill requests a written statement about the Emancipation Proclamation from Dr. King for inclusion in the souvenir program for the Michigan Prince Hall Grand Lodge's annual meeting. The program will celebrate the centennial anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation. Hill also requests a picture to include in the program.

Resurrection

Dr. King paraphrases Karl Barth's description of the resurrection in "The Epistle to the Romans."

Letter from Amelia Jones to MLK and the SCLC

Friday, February 18, 1966

The Toldeo NAACP Branch invites Dr. King to be their keynote speaker. Amelia Jacobs Jones, representing the NAACP, requests that suggested dates regarding Dr. King's availability be forwarded to her.

The Dilemma of Negro Americans

In this draft of a chapter for his book Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community?, Dr. King offers an in-depth description of the plight of African Americans over the past few hundred years and how it will never be fully understood by their white counterparts. He recounts the issues associated with American slavery – the dehumanization of slaves and the destruction of the family unit. He ties what happened in the past to what is occurring in the present, explaining that because of these layers of oppression African Americans have to play catch up to be seen as equals in America.

Newsweek: Road to Selma - Hope & Death

Newsweek issues this synopsis of the 1965 voting rights march from Selma to Montgomery. The article illustrates the details surrounding the brutal racial murder of Viola Liuzzo, delving into the federal investigation of Mrs. Liuzzo's murder and its impact on the future passage of the pending 1965 Voting Rights Act.

Immortality

Dr. King references the book of Psalms regarding the subject of immortality.

Handwritten Thank You Letter From MLK

Dr. King expresses his gratitude for contributions made to the SCLC, and informs the reader of the results of recent studies regarding illegitimate birth rates among negroes as opposed to whites.

Letter from Rachelle Horowitz to Dora McDonald

Thursday, September 7, 1967

Administrative Secretary for the A. Phillip Randolph Institute, Rachelle Horowitz apologizes to Dora McDonald for an apparent misunderstanding regarding pamphlet pricing.

MLK Press Statement Regarding Riots in Los Angeles

Friday, August 20, 1965

In this statement to the press, Dr. King comments on the Watts Riots that took place in Los Angeles, California. He further discusses the economic, social and racial inequalities that he feels were the cause of the violence.

Memo From Dora McDonald to MLK

Thursday, November 16, 1967

Miss Dora Mcdonald provides a brief summary of phone calls to Dr. King and the context of each.