Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"TAIWAN"

David T. Doherty Letter of Request to Dr. King

Friday, February 10, 1967

Mr. Deherty, a PH.D candidate at Stanford University, asks Dr. King if he will answer a few questions regarding the influence of Henry David Thoreau on his philosophy of non-violence.

Letter from George Lucas to MLK

Wednesday, September 30, 1964

George Lucas writes Dr. King to follow-up on a telephone conversation confirming Dr. King's appearance in Dayton, Ohio. Lucas informs Dr. King that the event will take place at the Field House of the University of Dayton.

Letter from J. Raymond Oliver to MLK

J. Raymond Oliver writes Dr. King regarding certification from the SCLC and disagreements with the NAACP. He also seeks support from Dr. King to integrate the schools in Winston-Salem.

Telegram from Zaira Singh to Pope Paul VI

Wednesday, February 14, 1968

Mrs. Singh, a Roman Catholic, requests that Pope Paul VI becomes a hostage in Hanoi, in order to end "barbarous American bombardment."

Jesus Christ (Two Natures)

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's notion of the "two natures of Christ." Reinhold Niebuhr was a scholastic mentor of Dr. King and was therefore cited in several of his theological works.

Integrating Elementary Schools in Berkeley

Thursday, April 20, 1967

This article details the integration of several Berkeley area elementary schools. The Presidents of each school give feedback regarding the public's response and their plans on how they will proceed.

Letter from MLK to Vice President Richard Nixon

Wednesday, January 11, 1956

Dr. King and fellow clergymen commend Vice President Nixon on his work bringing attention to the suffering Hungarian refugees in Austria. They urge him to take a similar trip to the South and meet with the thousands of victims of racial oppression.

Vietnam and Beyond

This program for the Ecumenical and Community Conference held at the Thornfield Conference Center in Cazenovia, New York, highlights leaders from across the globe invited to attend the conference. These leaders were invited to support the efforts in Vietnam and assess policies regarding the country.

SCLC Newsletter: March-April 1966

This is an example of one of many SCLC Newsletters printed for public distribution. In this third volume, topics include: Bloody Sunday, Dr. King Thanks Sweden, Man with a Plan, Abernathy Tells Hawaii of Brotherhood, and several others.

Letter from O. L. Sherrill to Ralph David Abernathy

Thursday, April 25, 1968

The Executive Secretary of the General Baptist State Convention of North Carolina requests multiple copies of the program from Dr. King's funeral service.

Open Letter Regarding Chicago Real Estate Practices

Monday, August 1, 1966

Lee Brooke, of Oak Park River Forest Housing Committee near Chicago, sends an open letter to members of Congress, the Governor of Illinois and the Chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission. In it, he discusses discriminatory real estate practices in the Chicago area, and presents evidence gathered by the housing committee to show why there is a need to regulate the real estate industry.

Letter from Eileen Coyne to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Second grader Eileen Coyne sends condolences to the King family. She and her classmates were instructed to write letters to Mrs. King to express their feelings following Dr. King's assassination. This document is a part of a collection of sixteen letters from this Bronx, New York classroom.

Letter from MLK to Brigitte Kirch of Germany

Wednesday, November 13, 1963

Dr. King thanks Brigitte Kirch for her encouraging letter.

Civil Rights Symposium Program

Thursday, April 8, 1965

This document is a program from a symposium workshop on national and local civil rights challenges.

A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart

Dr. King uses Matthew 10:16 as the text for this sermon delivered August 30, 1959 at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery. Soft mindedness, he asserts, makes men gullible, superstitious, and fearful of change and fosters the belief that science and religion are in conflict. It contributes to racial prejudice and is capitalized upon by dictators. But tough mindedness, King says, must be tempered by a compassionate heart. The nonviolent struggle for freedom and justice must combine tough mindedness and tenderness of heart.

Letter from Rosamond Reynolds to MLK

Rosamond C. Reynolds informs Dr. King that the Fifth General Assembly of the Unitarian Universalist Association adopted a comprehensive Statement of Consensus on Racial Justice. The statement reflects "the preponderance of opinion of the denomination, its members, and its churches, on the problems of segregation, discrimination, racial violence, education, housing..."

Brotherhood Cannot Be a Theory

Friday, February 19, 1965

This newspaper clipping of The Southern Israelite features segments on the Atlanta banquet honoring Dr. King's acceptance of the Nobel Peace Prize. Given on his return to the States, there were twelve hundred and fifty Atlanta citizens in attendance. Included articles are: welcoming comments by Rabbi Jacob Rothschild, a tribute by Archbishop Paul Hallinan, and a transcription of Dr. King's speech.

How My Mind has Changed in the Last Decade

Dr. King writes notes on how his mind has changed in recent years. King states that while his main focus was on theology and philosophy, he also focused on social ethics. According to Dr. King, segregation is a tool that exploits the Negro and poor whites. He saw similarities with the liberation of India's people from Britain and asserts that his trip to India cultivated his ideologies on nonviolence.

MLK's Address at the Pilgrimage for Democracy

Sunday, December 15, 1963

Dr. King discusses the issues of segregation, poverty and discrimination within the City of Atlanta, in this 1963 speech at the Pilgrimage for Democracy. He explains that although Atlanta was thought to be a place of "racial harmony," the reality of glaring discrimination in Atlanta's schools, restaurants, and housing has left the local Negro community "tired," and hungry for change.

Letter to Kenneth Gibbs from Dora McDonald

Monday, September 30, 1963

Ms. McDonald sends Mr. Gibbs a letter of thanks for his kind letter of support and encloses an autographed cover of TIME magazine on behalf of Dr. King.

Letter from James Lawson to MLK

Wednesday, October 16, 1963

Rev. Jim Lawson encloses a check on behalf of Protestant missionaries wanting to support the civil rights movement. He mentions that he taught nonviolence to these missionaries and notes that they wanted the contribution to assist in a scholarship for a student that participated in the Birmingham campaign. Rev. Lawson was the individual who invited Dr. King to Memphis on his final mission to help the plight of disenfranchised santitation workers.

Donation Receipt

Thursday, January 13, 1966

This document is a receipt for a donation made to the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc.

Handwritten Notecard Regarding "Patripassianism"

Dr. King outlines "Patripassianism" .This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from MLK to Spilman

Thursday, July 30, 1964

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Mr. and Mrs. Spilman for their monetary contribution to the SCLC. He acknowledges how such funds have been allocated to combat the civil injustices faced by Negroes in America. He concludes by addressing the future social and political agendas of the SCLC.

Letter from W.O. Gill to MLK

W. O. Gill expresses his gratitude for the generosity that Coretta Scott King extended to him. He then tells Mrs. King that his secretary is sending her a check for $2.00, and that he looks forward to being able to visit with Dr. King. He ends the letter with a quote from the bible.

Letter from Mrs. Ted Gustafson to MLK

Sunday, December 10, 1967

Mrs. Ted Gustafson writes Dr. King to express her dismay with pastors and the pulpit, providing her belief that a Saint is long overdue.

Letter from Rose Mary to MLK

Wednesday, February 7, 1968

Seventh grader Rose Mary writes to Dr. King commending his efforts concerning "racial problems" and informing him of her admiration.

March on Washington to End the War in Vietnam

Saturday, April 17, 1965

Thousands of students from across the nation collectively organized a March on Washington to end the war in Vietnam. The students were attempting to voice their disapproval of the war and asked that conscientious individuals join them.

Letter from J. Purcell to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968

A "Poor White Texan" sends Dr. King a letter of support and encourages him to run for President. The writer explains that it is not until the people achieve racial unity that the world will be at peace.

Letter from Vera M. Jones to MLK

Wednesday, November 11, 1964

Inspired by an article in the Saturday Evening Post, Vera Jones congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.