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To Set Our People Free

This poem by Mrs. Eudora V. Savage is dedicated to the African American veterans of World War Two.

Where Do We Go From Here (Chapter V Draft)

This draft of Where Are We Going?, Chapter 5 of Dr. King's book Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? was significantly edited before publication but the central ideas are here. The government's failure to develop economic justice programs cannot be blamed on the Civil Rights Movement's lack of ideas, as often claimed. Building the political will for change is more important for the movement. The rights of Negroes to economic well-being are well aligned with goals and tactics of the labor movement. Negro leadership needs to be developed from within the community.

Georgia Council on Human Relations

The author informs the readers about the poverty problem in Georgia. They claim that the AFDC or "Aid to Families of Dependent Children" needs improvement. The author also mentions issues such as unemployment, education and voter registration.

Letter from MLK to Debbie Steiner

Tuesday, June 9, 1964

Dr. King thanks Miss Steiner for her letter and explains how love is the way to overcome the injustices brought on by prejudice and ignorance. He writes that, though it can be difficult, she must direct her thoughts in a loving way towards those who mistreat her.

Gethsemane

Dr. King notes the Biblical story of Jesus' experience before his crucifixion. He uses the parable to speak to the human experience of pain and the faith one must have in God. Jesus went to Gethsemane to pray. He brought apostles John, James, and Peter and had them take watch while he prayed in the garden. When Jesus returned, his friends were sleeping. At this moment, Jesus realized their indifference to his agony. Though standing in pain and loneliness, Jesus used his faith in God to accept his situation as it was, with no efforts of escape.

Letter from John R. Loch to MLK

Monday, November 7, 1966

John R. Loch, Director of the Student Union at the University of Pittsburgh, thanks Dr. King on behalf of the Public Affairs Committee for his visit to the University. He also encloses a copy of the "Pitt News" that reported his visit.

Letter from Betty Doocy to MLK

Monday, April 17, 1967

Betty Doocy of Chicago, Illinois mildly criticizes Dr. King for leading marches in an effort to integrate neighborhoods in Chicago. She tells Dr. King of her experiences living in poverty as a non-Negro, and how her family has been able to survive and endure hardships. Doocy encourages Dr. King to instruct Negroes to properly take care of their living quarters and to be respectable in their job professions.

Worship

Dr. King provides a definition of worship.

Letter from Catherine Aller to MLK

Thursday, May 12, 1966

Catherine Aller writes Dr. King regarding his awareness of agape and its "historic appearance on the Day of Pentecost."

Telegram from Bill Barrett to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

Congressman Bill Barrett sends this telegram to Dr. King notifying him of his support of the Committee Bill.

Letter from MLK to Maurine B. Neuberger

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Oregon Senator Maurine B. Neuberger to express gratitude for her support of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

An Invitation to a Dedication by Olivet and Her Friends

Wednesday, June 1, 1966

Olivet Institutional Baptist Church sponsors a month long dedication to the opening of the O. M. Hoover Christian Community Center in Cleveland, Ohio. Dr. King is listed as a participant in the dedication.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to the Mapp and Welch Families

Thursday, February 2, 1967

Dr. and Mrs. Coretta Scott King express their condolences to the Mapp and Welch Families, and the West Hunter Street Baptist Church.

Letter from Dr. Helen Curth to the MLK Memorial Fund

Thursday, April 11, 1968

Dr. Curth encloses a donation for the Martin Luther King Memorial Fund. She requests that a receipt for $5 be sent to each of her two grandsons so that they may feel connected to Dr. King's memory.

Letter from William Perkins to MLK

This letter comes from a military inmate who makes claim to Dr. King of mistreatment and unjust imprisonment. Private William Perkins requests the assistance of Dr. King prior to writing to his congressman to complain of abuse and a lack of proper medical care.

Letter from Thomas H. Rogers to MLK

Saturday, February 11, 1967

On Race Relations Sunday, Thomas H. Rogers writes this letter to express his brotherhood and prayers for Dr. King. Emphasizing that one live a life acceptable to God, Rogers believes that God, not man, makes the only judgement. Though of a different race than Dr. King, Rogers sees Dr. King as his brother in Christ and encourages him to do God's biding.

Dr. King Sermon Outline

Dr. King prepares notes for the sermon "Three Levels of Fellowship" deriving from 1st Corinthians 1:2, 9.

New Wine in New Bottles

Dr. King outlines a sermon he preached at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery on October 17, 1954. His text is Matthew 9:17. He compares new ideas to new wine, stating that an idea cannot progress if people are not ready to accept it; this is what it means for an idea to be before its time. New ideas require new structures to contain them. The same is true in our personal lives when we resolve to rid ourselves of bad habits.

Laymen's Retreat League

Sunday, June 4, 1967

This letter from Thomas Gedeon serves as a response to a notion and tentative dates for a clergy retreat including Dr. King.

Letter from Water L. Hoston to SCLC

Saturday, October 28, 1967

Walter Hoston, of American Bridge Association, sends his company's contribution to the SCLC in support of their work for justice and equality.

Dr. King in his Office at SCLC

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

Agenda for the SCLC State and Local Leaders

Friday, February 2, 1962

This agenda outlines several topics discussed for the Southwide Meeting of State and Local Leaders. Dr. King, the President of the SCLC, spoke on SCLC's 'People to People' Program.

Project "C" Progress Report

Thursday, March 28, 1963

Detailed progress report on a project that is referred to as Project "C."

Letter to Dr. Abernathy Regarding MLK Memorial Service

Dr. Abernathy receives this letter from an anonymous sender suggesting that the SCLC plan a memorial service in commemoration of Dr. King on Emancipation Day. The writer provides a list of music and poems that would be appropriate for the occasion.

Letter from Congressman James G. O'Hara to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965

Congressman James G. O'Hara, US Representative from Michigan, informs Dr. King that he has signed the home rule discharge petition for the District of Columbia.

Letter from Steve Adams to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Steve Adams devotes his support to Dr. King and the nonviolent movement. He mistakenly expresses condolences to Dr. King on the death of his father. However, Dr. King's father "Daddy King" would not pass away until November of 1984.

Speech to the Freedom Riders

Sunday, May 21, 1961

King delivered this speech, in Montgomery, Alabama, in 1961, at a rally to support the Freedom Riders. King encourages them to maintain postures and attitudes of non-violence in the face of violent responses to their actions and resistance. He assures them that while they will experience a "season of suffering," the moral rightness of their cause will prevail.

Letter from Harley Lappin to MLK

Wednesday, January 3, 1968

The Public Affairs Committee of Winters College at York University in Ontario invites Dr. King to participate in a discussion to raise student awareness of current political issues.

Notecard Listing Various Scriptures from Isaiah

Dr. King lists numerous scriptures from the Old Testament book of Isaiah related to the topics of righteous living, anger and sin.

Letter from K. B. M. Crooks, Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, November 7, 1967

K. B. M. Crooks, Jr., of the Southeast Regional Office of the National Urban League, writes to Dr. King about a letter of recommendation for Lonnie King, Jr.