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Kierkegaard

Dr. King quotes Soren Kierkegaard's "Einübung im Christentum" ["Practice in Christianity"].

Letter from Marilyn Sauer to MLK

Wednesday, May 31, 1967

Marilyn Sauer, Administrative Assistant to Dr. L. M. McCoy, provides Dr. King with the address of the Archbishop of Recife. Sauer also informs Dr. King of the proper way to address the Archbishop.

Letter from Lawrence G. Holt to MLK Regarding Civil Rights

Saturday, September 30, 1967

In this Letter, Lawrence Holt writes to Dr. King urging him to limit his public comments to those regarding civil rights and not the war in Vietnam. Holt states, "You are in a unique position to help the civil rights movement which you are endangering by your public comments on the war."

Letter to MLK from Violet Calvert

Thursday, July 1, 1965

Violet Calvert expresses to Dr. King that she has little money but she uses letters to fight for equality. She shows Dr. King a copy of one of her published letters.

Letter from Adrienne Lombardi to MLK

Thursday, February 8, 1968

Adrienne Lombardi writes Dr. King to express her gratitude that he believes everyone owes their first allegiance to God. She also discusses her view on religion and her sentiments regarding the war.

Letter from MLK to Gilbert J. Clark

Saturday, May 21, 1966

Dr. King informs Gilbert J. Clark, Chairman at the Law School Forum, that he is unable to speak in Edmonton under the auspices of the Alberta Law School Forum during his trip to Canada.

Letter from Mrs. Samuel Turkenkopf to Coretta Scott King

Thursday, October 15, 1964

Overwhelmed by the news of MLK winning the Noble Peace Prize, Mrs. Turkenkopf expresses her congratulations to Mrs. King.

Letter from William Stuart Nelson to MLK

Thursday, July 15, 1965

William Stuart Nelson writes Dr King prompting him to take into consideration a request from Mr. G. L. Mehta as will as to visit Africa. Nelson comments on the importance of the non-violence concept being propagated across India and Africa.

Letter from Bernard Edelman to MLK

Tuesday, October 24, 1967

Bernard Edelman, a former supporter of Dr. King and the SCLC, expresses his objection to Dr. King's stance on Vietnam.

Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. White

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Mr. White for considering him to be on Per Se Advisory Board, but due to a busy schedule Dr. King declines his offer.

Letter from Weston C. Pullen to MLK

Tuesday, July 2, 1963

Weston C. Pullen, Vice President for Broadcasting at Time Incorporated, thanks Dr. King for his expedited response and cooperation "in filming a message on civil rights."

Letter from Eleanor Allen to MLK

Wednesday, November 20, 1963

Eleanor Allen, Director of Christian Education of the Edgewood Congregational Church, writes Dr. King in an effort to connect with a Pastor of a Negro church that is in need of rebuilding "after the recent bombings."

Transcript of National Educational Television's For Freedom Now

Tuesday, July 23, 1963

For Freedom Now, with host Dr. Kenneth Clark, is television’s first exchange of ideas by the leaders of five organizations engaged in securing full civil rights for Negroes. Featured guests are Dr. King of SCLC, Whitney Young of the National Urban League, James Farmer of CORE, James Forman of SNCC, and Roy Wilkins of the NAACP.

Telegram from Winfield P. Woolf, Jr. to the SCLC Board of Strategy

Sunday, March 31, 1968

Just three days before the assassination, Winfield P. Woolf, Jr. asserts that removing Dr. King from the SCLC would be disastrous.

Albany Movement Position Paper

Tuesday, July 17, 1962

This paper states that segregation is both unconstitutional and immoral. It calls for a face-to-face meeting with the Albany, Georgia City Commission to discuss disposition of cases against the Albany Movement and a commitment to the First Amendment right of peaceful protest; clarification of the city’s position on the recent Interstate Commerce Commission ruling and desegregation of the city’s buses, and establishment of a bi-racial commission to recommend a timetable for desegregating lunch counters, the library, schools, and parks.

SCLC Tour of Northern Cities

Dr. King announces an SCLC tour of Chicago, Cleveland, Philadelphia and Washington, DC. He cites the wish to establish communication with people in the black ghettos of northern cities and to assist local leadership in taking movement issues into their communities. He mentions the moral and material support provided by northern allies for the southern struggle and a time to reciprocate.

School of Youth for Social Service

The School of Youth for Social Service in South Vietnam aided in immediate war relief, as well as a long range of programs such as rural health & sanitation, agriculture, and illiteracy.

Letter from Ralph M. Holdeman to MLK Pertaining to a Speaking Invitation

Tuesday, February 21, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Holdeman of the National Council of Churches of Christ, requests that Dr. King speak at the Ecumenical Evangelism Conference in Wisconsin.

Letter from James P. Dixon of Antioch College to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965

James P. Dixon, President of Antioch College, thanks Dr. King for accepting an invitation to speak at the school's commencement ceremony.

Christianity

Through quoting an unknown Christian, Dr. King calls for modern Christians to accept a personal challenge that will one day enable historians to declare that it was Christianity that held the world together.

Letter from MLK to David Sutton

Thursday, December 16, 1965

Dr. King regretfully informs Mr. Sutton of his inability to speak at Drexel Institute for the 1965-1966 calendar year. At the time of writing, Dr. King was engaged in non-violent grass roots efforts throughout the South to end racial discrimination. His commitment to community issues would oftentimes force him to refuse public speaking engagements, among other requests.

Walk for Freedom

In this article, Dr. King address the issue of racism occurring in Montgomery. It was here that African Americans, including Dr. King, were victims to humiliation and violent acts because of their race. Dr. King further promote nonviolent protest to combat this civil injustice.

Holiday Card from the King Family to Rosa Parks

The King Family send their holiday greetings to Mrs. Rosa Parks in this holiday card.

Letter from Eartha Kitt to MLK

Eartha Kitt expresses her admiration for Dr. King and his cause.

Telegram from MLK to Mr. Sylveter A. Okereke

Friday, August 6, 1965

Dr. King regrettably informs Mr. Okereke that he will be unable to accept his invitation for an event held on August 18, 1965.

Letter from MLK Requesting Support

Saturday, August 1, 1964

Dr. King sent this letter soliciting donations for the SCLC following the Civil Rights Act of 1964. He says there is gratifying compliance with desegregation in some areas and renewed defiance elsewhere. ?Responsibility is as important as militancy,? King writes, in challenging segregation and discrimination. The SCLC pledges both.

Press Release from the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc.

Wednesday, November 24, 1965

The Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. informs supporters about the recent attacks on civil rights groups located in Knoxville, Tennessee.

Howe Fears Draft Of Too Many Students

This article discusses how Education Commissioner Harold Howe complained to a House Special Education Sub-Committee that more than a third of graduate students could expect to be drafted in the following year due to the changes in the Selective Service law.

Problem of Evil

Dr. King writes about the problem of evil according to the 10th chapter of Proverbs.

Niebuhr, Reinhold

Dr. King references the preface to Reinhold Niebuhr's book, "Reflection on the End of an Era."