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Letter from Kennon Brownlee to MLK

Thursday, October 12, 1967
Texas (TX), Dallas, TX, VIETNAM

Kennon R. Brownlee, a social science major at Bishop College, asks Dr. King for his opinion concerning the war in Vietnam.

Malcolm X Statement by MLK

Monday, March 16, 1964

Dr. King responds to Malcolm X's break with Elijah Muhammad of the Nation of Islam by calling Malcolm’s program of “reciprocal bleeding” regrettable. This is more an indictment of a society whose racial ills produce a Malcolm X than of the man himself. The national community is now challenged to support full citizenship for Negroes while they still accept nonviolent leadership.

Letter from Bob Edmiston to MLK

Sunday, March 31, 1968
Oklahoma (OK)

Bob Edmiston of Northeastern State College writes Dr. King requesting campaign material for "Choice 68," the national collegiate primary sponsored by Time magazine.

Letter from Brigitte Horburger to MLK

GERMANY

Brigitte Horburger sends Dr. King a photograph of a black child and white child playing the piano together. Under the photograph it states, "To produce real harmony you must play both the black and white keys."

Letter from John H. Hatcher to MLK

Thursday, February 29, 1968
Georgia (GA)

John H. Hatcher of Circle K International invites Dr. King to speak at "A Study of State Government." This event will contain several state and national leaders. The date of this document has close proximity to the Memphis march and Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Barbara Hannagan to MLK

California (CA)

Barbara Hannagan, a student at Gridley Union High School in California, requests information from Dr. King to assist her with a term paper. She expresses her interest in the history of Negroes in America and how that correlates to the current issues of Negroes in "white society."

Letter from MLK to Glenn Greenwood

Wednesday, October 23, 1963
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Dr. King responds to Glenn Greenwood's letter thanking him for his suggestion regarding the Pentagon directive "in relation to Armed Forces personnel participation in civil rights demonstrations."

Letter from MLK to Wesley Fisher

Wednesday, February 27, 1963
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for the kind letter from Mr. Fisher. He also informs him that Aaron Henry has been absent and will probably reply about some donated clothing upon his return.

Letter from Schuyler Coward to MLK

Friday, January 28, 1966
Chicago, IL

Schuyler Coward encloses three cartoons that he drew to Dr. King. He expresses his wishes to serve Dr. King's organization and requests a swift response to his letter.

MLK Reflections on the Selma March, Bloody Sunday, SNCC and Communism

Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King discusses the Selma to Montgomery march, calling it the "most powerful and dramatic civil rights protest ever held in the south." Dr. King also addresses criticism of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee's tactics. He concludes these notes by responding to claims that he has communist ties, denying any foreign or left-wing influence on his actions. Of Bayard Rustin and C. T.

Urban Training Center for Christian Mission

Friday, July 7, 1967
Ohio (OH), Michigan (MI), Pennsylvania (PA), Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Included in this letter to the board members of the Urban Training Center for Christian Mission are several pertinent documents from the organization. The author of the letter, Jim Morton, informs the reader of an upcoming board meeting and encourages them to turn in an application for "The Now Thing" as soon as possible.

Letter from Doris Everett to MLK

Virginia (VA), Montgomery, AL

Ms. Everett expresses appreciation to Dr. King for leading a successful boycott in Montgomery, Alabama and for his contributions to help Negros obtain equality.

Letter from William Adams to MLK

Tuesday, April 18, 1967
New Orleans, LA, New York, NY, Louisville, KY

William Adams from the New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary writes Dr. King informing him of political matters in New York City, which may hinder the civil rights efforts of African Americans.

Judaism

Dr. King quotes a statement from Joseph Klausner's book "From Jesus to Paul" regarding Judaism. Joseph Klausner was a Jewish historian.

MLK's Sermon Notes

Dr. King drafted the intro of this sermon to place emphasis on the pros and cons of despair. The place and date of where this sermon was preached is not known.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Geraldine Fones

Friday, January 12, 1968
London, England

Ms. McDonald informs Ms. Fones that Dr. King will not be able to speak to the Oxford Union Society in London due to commitments in the United States around the same time frame.

Letter from Dr. John Halsey to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1963
Connecticut (CT), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. James Halsey of the University of Bridgeport expresses gratitude for Dr. King's contribution to the Alumni Average Gift Improvement Matching Plan.

Reason (Its Value in Revelation)

Dr. King quotes John Locke’s “An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, Book IV.”

The Transcendental Dialectics

Dr. King writes on the "soul" and the "world" as two ideas of reason. He speaks to the human tendency to apply the categories of quantity, quality, relation, and modality to our understanding of the self. King ends these notes by contemplating "two absolutely contradictory propositions [that] seem to be established by the refutation of the other."

Liberal Theology

Dr. King paraphrases [Theodore G.] Soares on the religious liberal.

Sin

Dr. King cites a scripture from the Old Testament biblical Book of Leviticus regarding the transformation of sin.

Letter from MLK to the Erie, Pennsylvania NAACP

Friday, March 30, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak from Erie Branch of the NAACP.

American Foundation on Nonviolence

Friday, October 1, 1965
Lowndes County, AL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

As Honorary Chairman of the American Foundation on Nonviolence, Dr. King presents a draft letter in which he calls for individuals to tackle the issues of voter registration, non-violence training, and protection of civil rights leaders by joining the organization and serving on its Board of Directors. Dr. King himself pledges $25,000 of his Nobel Peace Prize funds to the American Foundation on Nonviolence.

Letter from Edward O'Brien to MLK

Friday, July 10, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY, Connecticut (CT)

Edward O'Brien writes Dr. King inquiring about the release of his new book, as he is unable to find it in bookstores.

Letter from Mrs. Ruth Spencer to MLK

Sunday, August 27, 1967
California (CA), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Mrs. Spencer shares her belief that "the Negro problem and the Vietnamese War are part of the same problem," though often concealed by news media propaganda. She expresses her gratitude towards Dr. King for his nonviolent philosophy and offers her financial support.

Letter from C. M. Williams to Ralph David Abernathy

Wednesday, April 24, 1968
California (CA)

In this letter, addressed to Reverend Ralph Abernathy, supporter C.M. Williams references Dr. King's funeral and requests a copy of his last speech. Many sympathizers and mourners wrote letters like this to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference after Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Mildred Maroney to MLK about a Donation

Thursday, May 11, 1967
Washington, D.C.

In this letter Mildred Maroney of the Brookings Institute forwards a donation which was an honorarium due to Mr. Robinson Hollister. This was done because Mr. Hollister requested that the honorarium be donated to the SCLC on his behalf.

Letter from Lillian Smith to MLK

Sunday, October 25, 1964
Georgia (GA)

Lillian Smith writes to Dr. King in regards to being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, she expresses her admiration of his leadership, and how his success has helped her through her numerous hospital visits.

Handwritten Notecard Regarding "Power"

This index card written by Dr. King references quotations pertaining to the concept of "Power".

Letter from Dora McDonald to Sandra Durlauf

Thursday, October 29, 1964
California (CA)

Dora McDonald encloses Dr. King's biographical information to help aid Sandra Durlauf in her studies. She also refers Mrs. Durlauf to read Dr. King's books "Stride Toward Freedom," "Crusader Without Violence," and "Strength to Love."