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Letter fromJitsuo Morikawa to MLK

Friday, December 27, 1963

Jituso Morikawa expresses his delight that Dr. King will make an attempt to alter his schedule to speak in Atlantic City to the American Baptist Jubilee Advance.

Telegram from Rodney Clurman to MLK

Monday, February 6, 1967

Rodney Clurman, of the World Food and Population Crisis Committee, asks Dr. King if he can access his mailing list or circulate material that Clurman provides in an effort to end the famine in India.

Letter from Joan Kennedy to MLK

Saturday, July 18, 1964

Joan Kennedy thanks Dr. King for his support.

Who Are We?

Saturday, February 5, 1966

In this sermon Dr. King contemplates "who are we?" and "what is man?". He differentiates between the pessimistic attitudes of the materialistic understandings of man and the optimistic attitudes of humanistic definitions of man. King also states that man is neither all good nor all bad, but a combination. Man is both an everlasting miracle and mystery.

Sin

Dr. King quotes two verses from the book of Leviticus.

The Wind of Change is Blowing

Wednesday, June 27, 1962

Dr. King addresses the positive changes that have taken place across the world and how they should continue to occur until equality is reached.

Letter to MLK from Angry Citizen of Detroit

Friday, July 14, 1967

A bothered citizen of Detroit writes Dr. King, who is referred to as the "negro champion," to express personal views on the status of the Negroes in the city.

Invitation from the Ambassador of Ethiopia to MLK

The Ambassador of Ethiopia extends an invitation for Dr. King to attend a reception honoring Haile Selassie I, the Emperor of Ethiopia.

The Plain Dealer: Dr. King Here Today to Gauge Tensions

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

This article, printed in "The Plain Dealer," provides a brief history of Dr. King and details the plans he had for Cleveland, OH.

Out of Segregation's Long Night

Dr. King addresses the crisis of race relations in America by asserting that there would not be a crisis if blacks accepted inferiority and injustice. He also discusses the physical and spiritual harm that segregation and slavery has caused for blacks and the effect that violence has on the community. Dr. King closes with remarks regarding nonviolence and what it truly represents.

Letter from Congressman Adam Clatyon Powell to MLK

Friday, April 16, 1965

Harlem Representative Adam Clayton Powell informs Dr. King that all of the "War on Poverty" hearings will be cancelled until furtherl notice.

Telegram from MLK to Derhanov Dinke

Dr. King informs Ambassador Derhanov Dinke that it is his pleasure to serve as Honorary President for the Gandhi Society for Human Rights. He invites Ambassador Dinke to attend a luncheon at the Sheraton Carlton Hotel in Washington, D. C.

Letter from Professor Clyde Manschreck to MLK

Sunday, July 7, 1963

Clyde L. Manschreck, a professor of church history at the Methodist Theological School in Ohio, asks permission to include "Letter from Birmingham City Jail" in his upcoming collection entitled "History of Christianity from the Reformation to the Present," as well as the letter that inspired it.

Letter from Randolph T. Blackwell to MLK

Randolph T. Blackwell notifies Dr. King about the Office of Economic Opportunity grant to Crawfordville Enterprises in Taliaferro County, Georgia. The program will provide economic expansion for rural areas and education development.

Letter from Moreland Griffith Smith to MLK

Wednesday, February 17, 1965

Moreland Griffith Smith, Chairman of the Alabama Advisory Committee, invites Dr. King or a representative to an open meeting which will be held in Alabama. The purpose of the meeting is to gather information regarding equal protection under the law in areas such as housing, voting, and employment.

Knowing God (Wieman)

Dr. King notes Henry Nelson Wieman's ideas on how man comes to know God.

Letter from Dimitri Papaspyrou to MLK

Thursday, January 26, 1967

Dimitri Papaspyrou, President of the Parliament, invites Dr. King to Greece to create a better understanding between Greek and American people.

Letter from Reverend Robert Jacoby to MLK

Monday, June 17, 1963

Reverend Robert Jacoby informs Dr. King that his Letter From Birmingham Jail was used in the Sunday worship service sermon.

Letter from Audrey Mizer to MLK

Sunday, December 3, 1961

Audrey Mizer encourages Dr. King to continue his good works because "the world cannot be robbed of any good." Mizer then discusses her opposing views to a statement in a Christian Monitor Column regarding Red China's admission to the United Nations.

Letter from Silas Norman to MLK

Tuesday, July 20, 1965

Silas Norman, State Project Director of the Alabama SNCC, writes Dr. King to inform him that they have not received a response from a past telegram inviting him to speak at a rally in Lowndes County, Alabama.

Notecard Containing the Definition of Evil

In this notecard Dr. King details the reason for suffering. He references notes from "City of God" by St. Augustine.

Papal Infallibility

Dr. King defines papal infallibility.

Letter from "A Southerner" to MLK

This letter, signed by, "A Southerner", suggests that Dr. King persuade Black people to return to Africa.

Letter from Congressman Augustus F. Hawkins to MLK

Friday, June 11, 1965

Augustus Hawkins, the first black Congressman from California, asks Dr. King to offer suggestions and comments about how to further the aims of the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964. Hawkins reports that the act has garnered resistance from local political leadership because many fear it will undermine their power.

Letter from Leslie A. Strikes to MLK

Wednesday, December 27, 1967

Leslie Strike, Canadian Vice President of the English-Speaking Union of the Commonwealth, invites Dr. King to speak on the US Civil Rights Movement.

Difference of the Transition Period from the Early Scientific Period

Dr. King references Alfred North Whitehead by noting the differences between the Transition Period and the Early Scientific Period.

Injunction from the City of Birmingham

Several members of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, including Dr. King, receive a temporary injunction from the City of Birmingham.

Banner at "Poor People's March," Washington, D.C. June, 1968

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

Statement to SCLC Board: Alabama Movement

Friday, April 2, 1965

Dr. King discusses the various issues within the State of Alabama. Dr. King and the SCLC have maintained leadership in the Alabama Movement and have proposed a plan to continue the acts of nonviolence.

Letter from J. L. Roberts to MLK

Tuesday, September 19, 1967

Minister Roberts writes to Dr. King expressing his support of the Civil Rights Movement along with making a donation to the SCLC.