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"Stockholm, Sweden"

Letter from I.M. Sternberg to MLK

Wednesday, December 1, 1965

I.M. Sternberg, Western Electric Public Affairs Representative, poses four questions regarding the social conditions of Blacks. Sternberg requests feedback from Dr. King in order to raise awareness and to promote social justice activism among company employees.

Letter to Reverend Ralph Abernathy from Eleanore Wallace

Sunday, April 28, 1968

Mrs. Wallace writes to Rev. Abernathy in admiration of how he has carried on the work of Dr. King and wants to know how she can further contribute to the SCLC.

South African Victims of Apartheid

Friday, December 10, 1965

The American Committee on Africa hosts a human rights rally and benefit on behalf of the victims of South African Apartheid. This program provides a brief history and overall purpose of the committee and outlines the projected schedule of events.

Letter from Charles Sherrod to Friends of SNCC

Saturday, July 22, 1961

Field Secretary Charles Sherrod invites friends of the SNCC to an emergency meeting to outline the direction of the student and Civil Rights Movement. The meeting is to be held at the Highlander Folk School in Tennessee which serves as a training ground for nonviolence and civil rights activities.

Letter from J. P. Brookshire to MLK

J. P. Brookshire supports Dr. King's desire for equality and justice, but is critical of the methods by which Dr. King uses to obtain these goals. He also criticizes Dr. King's stand on the conflict in Vietnam and the draft.

Letter from Mr. Jonathan B. Weisbuch to MLK

Tuesday, January 9, 1962

Mr. Weisbuch offers a monetary donation to Dr. King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He praises Dr. King for his continued efforts in reforming the South and the entire country.

Telegram from Sargent Shriver to Coretta King

Tuesday, November 14, 1967

Sargent Shriver, American statesmen, activist, founder of Job Corps and Peace Crops, expresses gratitude for Mrs. King's public endorsement of the war against poverty.

Letter from Arthur L. Kinsolving to MLK

Tuesday, September 19, 1967

Arthur Kingsolving sends his thanks to Dr. King for remembering him and sending a copy of "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Nature and Thought

Dr. King summarizes views of Alfred North Whitehead in ?The Concept of Nature.?

Royalty Statement

Friday, June 30, 1967

This statement provides figures of terms and earned royalties for the German-language edition "Strength to Love."

Letter from Don Hill to MLK

Tuesday, March 5, 1963

Don Hill requests a written statement about the Emancipation Proclamation from Dr. King for inclusion in the souvenir program for the Michigan Prince Hall Grand Lodge's annual meeting. The program will celebrate the centennial anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation. Hill also requests a picture to include in the program.

Letter from Irene M. Koch to MLK

Tuesday, August 9, 1966

Irene M. Koch uses a Native American legend of a man walking in the moccasins of his enemy to gain understanding of his enemy. She relates this legend to the current civil rights movement and specifically the civil rights movement in Chicago, Illinois.

Telegram from Rev. T. A. Borders to Mrs. King

Monday, May 13, 1968

Rev. Borders conveys his prayers to Mrs. King, on behalf of the First Community Baptist Church.

Social Philosophy Seminar Outline

Dr. King’s outline of key figures and their respective works for the Social Philosophy course he taught at Morehouse College during the 1961-1962 academic year.

Letter from Frank Sullivan to MLK

Friday, March 24, 1967

In this letter, the president of the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers, Mr. Sullivan, informs Dr. King that the organization will look to donate to the S.C.L.C.

Telegram from Leroy B. Allen to MLK

Wednesday, September 20, 1967

The president of Cheyney State College invites Dr. King to deliver the Founder's Day Address any day in November of 1967.

Letter from the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament to MLK

Canon L. John Collins, a founder of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, invites Dr. King to speak at a rally in Trafalgar Square in London, England. The proposed rally will be based on the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, and Collins would like to provide a direct link between the rally and the Washington March through the participation of both Bayard Rustin and Dr. King.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dolly Davis

Wednesday, February 27, 1963

Dora McDonald informs Dolly Davis that Dr. King is absent from the city and they're looking forward to receiving the galleys to "the New World of Negro Americans" by Harold Isaacs.

MLK Fights For Peace

Saturday, April 1, 1967

Included on page four of this Bedding, Curtain and Drapery Workers Union newsletter is an article regarding Dr. King's courageous efforts in helping Negros achieve equality, and the support he has received from the trade union. The union also supports Dr. King's stand against the Vietnam war, and agrees that the war is harming America's domestic programs against poverty.

Letter from Martin Gal to MLK

Thursday, August 8, 1963

Martin Gal, Producer in Public Affairs at WMSB TV, requests permission rights to Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail" for broadcasting purposes. Gal seeks to create a short pictorial documentary with Dr. King reading the text as a voice-over.

Invitation from Henry Ford II

Friday, October 9, 1964

This letter from Henry Ford II is an invitation to a charitable dinner honoring General Eisenhower for receiving the Family of Man Award. The proceeds from the dinner will fund the programs of the Council which will aid families and youth.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Theodore A. Dilday

Wednesday, June 1, 1966

Dr. King writes Mrs. Dilday of Riverside Baptist Church to express his appreciation for her two contributions to the SCLC. He explains the current works of the SCLC in Chicago and Alabama and stresses the importance of supporters like her.

Letter from Alberta Brown to MLK

Monday, July 26, 1965

The Adah Grand Chapter write Dr. King regarding an enclosed check for the SCLC.

Legal Brief of Robert Greene

Robert Greene, a mixed race individual from New York, appeals his case to the Supreme Court of the United States. Greene asserts that New York investigators and police conspired to violate his civil rights by means of wrongful arrest and detention, even after his innocence became apparent. Furthermore, as Greene is recognized as indigent, his case proceeds "in forma pauperis," or without the burden of court costs and legal fees.

The Ultimate Doom of Evil

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "The Ultimate Doom of Evil." The text is derived from a Biblical text, which states that one should not fret over evil doers because God is our vindicator.

The Cartoonist's View: Make Gains In St. Augustine

This column features news on "gains in St. Augustine," and quotations from various sources on civil rights issues.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Paul J. Dolan

Wednesday, July 12, 1967

On behalf of Dr. King, Dora McDonald grants Paul J. Dolan approval to use the "I Have A Dream" speech that Dr. King delivered at the March on Washington.

Notecard regarding freedom

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines another thinker's views on freedom, according to the book, "Human Nature and Conduct." This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Russell H. Bull $1000 Scholarship

This pamphlet provides information on the Russell Bull $1,000 scholarship that is awarded by the United Packinghouse Food and Allied Workers, AFL-CIO. The annual scholarship is awarded to a high school or college student in financial need who displays outstanding contributions in civil rights. Dr. King is listed as one of the members of the Public Review Advisory Commission that administers the scholarship.

Letter to Coretta Scott King from Diana Melendez

Friday, April 5, 1968

Diana Melendez, a student at New York City's M.E.S. 146, wrote this letter to Coretta Scott King following a school assembly that announced the death of Dr. King. Melendez offers her condolences and writes that Mrs. King was truly lucky, as she "married a brave man."