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God in Isaiah

Dr. King cites Isaiah 55: 8,9 on the holiness and transcendence of God and distinguishes this from an anthropomorphic view of God.

Letter from Joan Daves to Andrew Young

Friday, April 21, 1967
New York (NY)

In this letter, Ms. Daves focuses on Dr. King's speeches and discusses copyrighting issues.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Heardy

Dr. King writes to Mrs. Heardy offering his apologies for being unable to financially assist her. He asserts that the SCLC financial resources are aimed at changing the laws so that a welfare system can be developed to further provide for the less fortunate.

Postcard from Clara Ward to MLK

Thursday, December 1, 1966
VIETNAM, Atlanta, GA

Ms. Ward addresses this postcard to Dr. King per her visit to Vietnam.

Dort, Canons of

SWITZERLAND

Dr. King documents a brief history of the Arminian judicial decision, officially titled "The Decision of the Synod of Dort."

Letter from Vera Galanter to MLK

Monday, January 15, 1962
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Mrs. Galanter informs Dr. King of mobilization efforts in the North to aid in "Negro Voter Registration programs in the South" and requests areas in need of support.

Letter from Eunice Johnson to Coretta Scott King

Monday, October 12, 1959
NIGERIA, Georgia (GA), Ohio (OH), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Eunice Johnson, an African woman born in America but now living in Nigeria, writes Mrs. King in hopes of being able to meet her during her visit to America. She hopes that they can discuss Dr. King's nonviolent campaign.

Numbers

Dr. King records class notes from the biblical Book of Numbers regarding ethics, knowledge, and sin.

Letter from Robert Hilborn to MLK

Monday, November 9, 1964
CANADA, Atlanta, GA

Robert Hilborn, President of the Empire Club of Canada, invites Dr. King to be the keynote speaker at one of their weekly Thursday luncheons. Hilborn lists previous speakers that have presented before the Club and he hopes Dr. King will be added to that list.

Wycliffites: Followers of John Wycliffe

Dr. King writes on the ideas of English philosopher John Wycliffe's followers, "Wycliffites."

Brief for the Petitioners

Saturday, October 1, 1966
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Wisconsin (WI), Kentucky (KY), California (CA), Connecticut (CT), Texas (TX), Louisiana (LA), New Hampshire (NH), South Carolina (SC), Rhode Island (RI), Maryland (MD), Virginia (VA), New York, NY, Florida (FL), Minnesota (MN), Georgia (GA)

This brochure illustrates questions as well as events pertaining to petitioners during the Civil Rights Movement. Important petitioners, such as Dr. King and Ralph David Abernathy, were convicted and charged with Contempt of Court in violation of the First and Fourteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution.

Letter from Louis Rome to MLK

Saturday, February 10, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI

Louis Rome, Executive Director of the Michigan Commission on Crime, extends an invitation for Dr. King to speak at the Governor's conference being held in Detroit.

Telegram from Artis Abrham to MLK

Friday, March 11, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Artis Abrham asks Dr. King's assistance regarding the Freedom Festival. Abrham reports that he has delivered posters and sold tickets to the festival, but the financial secretary still wants him to purchase his own ticket to attend the event.

God

Dr. King cites the Old Testament biblical book of Deuteronomy expressing that there is only one God.

Letter from William Seabron to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967
Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Department of Agriculture Assistant to the Secretary, William M. Seabron writes Dr. King to enquire about fire insurance for "Negro citizens." He explains that a lack of fire insurance prevents citizens from improving existing homes or building new ones, following disaster. In addition, he requests any additional information Dr. King may find useful to the Department of Agriculture.

Letter from Rev. Canon John S. Yaryan to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, May 13, 1964
San Francisco, CA, Atlanta, GA

Rev. Yaryan writes to confirm Dr. King's appearance at the Grace Cathedral in San Francisco. He asks that Dr. King preach not only for their morning service, but also the evening worhsip service as well.

Right & Wrong

Dr. King quotes James Martineau’s “Types of Ethical Theory, Volume II.”

Symbolism and the Cross

Dr. King records notes on symbolism as the expression of spiritual truths.

Telegram to MLK from Wolfgang Grimmig

Berlin, Germany

Dr. King gets invited to a lecture tour that will take place during the spring of 1966.

Schleiermacher (Religion & Ethics)

Dr. King quotes and writes about Friedrich Schleiermacher’s view in “Speeches on Religion” that criticizing a man’s actions is not criticizing his religion because he does not act from his religion. The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Letter from Arthur Kinoy to MLK

Tuesday, September 19, 1967
New Jersey (NJ)

In this letter, Mr. Kinoy informs Dr. King of an article in Rutgers' Law Review, that contains Kinoy's and Bill Kunstler's ideas in civil rights litigation. Kinoy is a law professor at Rutgers The State University.

Letter from Martin Sargent to MLK

Tuesday, September 14, 1965
London, England, FRANCE

Martin Sargent expresses his and the American Church in Paris' appreciation for Dr. King's attendance and participation.

The United Ministries

Texas (TX)

The prayer ask for God to help people become stronger in Christ while saving them from the evil and violence within the world.

Religion

Dr. King quotes William Ernest Hocking's "The Meaning of God in Human Experience."

104:3 General Correspondence 1967 (T)

Friday, April 21, 1967
Ohio (OH), Atlanta, GA, Oklahoma (OK), Cleveland, OH, VIETNAM

Richard Tennent Jr. requests that Dr. King consider applying his efforts of non-violence to Cleveland, Ohio "...to help prevent the violence that seems inevitable." Tennent states that he cannot support the Reverend's stance on the Vietnam War, either financially or intellectually.

Address by MLK at 47th NAACP Annual Convention

Wednesday, June 27, 1956
San Francisco, CA, Montgomery, AL, INDIA

Dr. King addresses the audience at the 47th NAACP annual convention in San Francisco, California. King begins with background information of slavery and its physical and mental effects on Africans, then tells the "Montgomery Story." This story begins with a mental transformation among blacks, which led to the Montgomery boycott. As a result of the boycott, blacks were empowered and began fighting injustice and seeking changes in unfair legislation.

Letter from Robert Brandeis to MLK

Monday, June 12, 1967
San Francisco, CA

Robert Brandies expresses his support regarding the efforts of Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Phyllis Light to the NAACP

Monday, June 17, 1963

Mrs. Light argues that the goals of the NAACP are too low. She compares the efforts of the movement to those of Hitler, Mussolini, Napoleon, and Caesar. Because of these comparisons, Mrs. Light promotes segregation amongst the races and accuses educated African Americans of abandoning their culture.

Letter from Charles McC. Mathias, Jr. to MLK

Friday, January 8, 1965
Maryland (MD), Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA

Congressman Mathias of Maryland thanks Dr. King for his recent letter urging him to vote against the seating of the Mississippi Delegation. Although Mathias' vote against the seating was defeated, he states that the mere challenge to it "has drawn once again the attention of the American public to this unfortunate situation."

A Christian Movement in a Revolutionary Age

Tuesday, September 28, 1965
New York (NY), Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Mississippi (MS), Massachusetts (MA), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Los Angeles, CA, Los Angeles, California, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, VIETNAM, CONGO / ZAIRE

In this address, Dr. King fuses the philosophies in the Old and New Testament regarding revolutionary social change. He argues that the most creative and constructive revolutionary force for change is one that combines the Old Testament’s “righteousness and justice that flow down like a mighty stream” with the New Testament’s call to love one’s enemies and bless those who persecute you. He asserts that God has been working actively since the time of Moses for the freedom and perfection of people and society. Dr.