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Prayer

Dr. King notes William James' description of prayer.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Harry Crosby to MLK

Sunday, March 8, 1964
Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA

The Crosby family of Massachusetts encloses a check to Dr. King to aid in the fight for equality. Mrs. Crosby notes that her husband was the first individual to employ a Negro teacher at Boston University, where Dr. King received his PhD in systematic theology.

Telegram from Norwegian Student Association to MLK

NORWAY

The Norwegian Student Association inquires if Dr. King will be available to give a lecture on Human Freedoms.

Pride

Dr. King quotes St. Augustine and C. S. Lewis on pride.

Speech at NAACP World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

Thursday, May 28, 1964
GREECE, GERMANY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, KENYA

Dr. King links the quest for individual civil rights to the global struggle for human rights and states that the nation that will achieve preeminence in the world is the one that both guarantees human rights for all and provides for basic needs.

Letter from Abram Eisenman to MLK

Sunday, April 16, 1967
San Francisco, CA, California (CA), New York, NY, New York (NY), Georgia (GA)

Abram Eisenman expresses appreciation and admiration for Dr. King's work. Eisenman also
addresses the divide of supporters within the Civil Rights Movement concerning the Vietnam War.

Letter from Patricia Reid to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967
Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Patricia Reid has mixed feelings about Dr. King and the position he has taken. Even though she and her husband agree with this stance on civil rights, they respectfully disagree on his position on the Vietnam War. The Reids believe that Dr. King shouldn't interfere with foreign policy unless he can come up with a viable solution to end the Vietnam War. However, they still feel compelled to contribute to the work of the SCLC, but warn Dr. King that other individuals may not be that sympathetic.

Letter from Joseph A. Howell to MLK

Tuesday, December 12, 1967
Chicago, IL, Philadelphia, PA

Mr. Howell requests that Dr. King support the efforts of the United Church of Christ to stop smoking in America.

Miracle

Dr. King quotes an excerpt from Fosdick's "Modern Use of the Bible."

God

Dr. King references the Old Testament book of Job regarding God's concern for man.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An anonymous individual sends Dr. King newspaper clippings showing African-Americans participating in looting and violence. Dr. King is asked to review the articles and offer comments via television.

Repentance

Dr. King clarifies the meaning of repentance according to the Old Testament.

Letter from Executive Director of Catholic Interracial Council to MLK

Friday, July 14, 1967
Chicago, IL

The following document is a cover letter of enclosed letters John A. McDermott sent seventeen Negro state legislators "congratulating them on their fight for fair housing".

Bacon

Dr. King notes Alexander Pope's characterization of Francis Bacon.

Advertisement for "Why We Can't Wait"

Monday, May 25, 1964
Birmingham, AL

Under the Additional Listings section of this magazine is a review about Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Edmond F. Tommy to Senator Edward W. Brooke

Monday, April 3, 1967
Washington, D.C., Connecticut (CT), SOUTH KOREA, NORTH KOREA, CHINA, VIETNAM, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, JAPAN, FRANCE, GERMANY

Mr. Toomy, a veteran of the first World War, writes to Senator Brooke detailing his stance on current military efforts. He provides a historical outline of war related events in relation to the United States military. He asserts that other Negro leaders are hindering progress in the Civil Rights movement due to their lack of patriotism.

Letter from Eldredge Hiller to MLK

Friday, June 4, 1965
New York, NY

Mr. Eldredge, Executive Director of The American Association of Fund-Raising Counsel, writes Dr. King to express criticism of a statement made in an SCLC fact leaflet regarding "commercial fund raisers." Eldredge states that, while many people in his Association are usually sympathetic to Dr. King's views, the "distasteful" sentiment is exception.

New South: The Current Crisis In Race Relations

Saturday, March 1, 1958
Montgomery, AL, New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), New York (NY), Georgia (GA), NIGERIA

Dr. King, as President of the Montgomery Improvement Association, examines the race relations crisis. He discusses how segregation makes the Negro feel inferior and unaccepted. Dr. King also affirms that he will not accept a system of violence and the "evils of segregation."

MLK Writes to Mrs. King from Jail

Tuesday, October 25, 1960
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King writes this letter to Coretta Scott King after recently being transferred to a state prison in Reidsville, Georgia. He expresses understanding of how the present circumstances are difficult for his family, particularly given Coretta's pregnancy with their third child, Dexter Scott King. King goes on to encourage Coretta to maintain strength and says that their excessive suffering will serve the greater purpose of freedom. He asks her to come visit him and requests that she bring several books, a collection of sermons and a radio.

Bayard Rustin: Right to Work Laws

Saturday, February 18, 1967
New York (NY), Alabama (AL), Arkansas (AR), Mississippi (MS), Texas (TX), North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC), Georgia (GA), Tennessee (TN), Virginia (VA), Florida (FL), PUERTO RICO

This booklet, written chiefly by Bayard Rustin, suggests that the "Right to Work" laws handicap minorities in the American workforce. The "Right to Work" law is a statute that bans union security agreements, which Rustin posits is undemocratic and assists in exploiting and perpetuating American poverty.

Telegram from Joseph Anderson to MLK

Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Joseph Anderson urges Dr. King to "call forth a day of prayer" to ease the uproar, most notably overshadowing such U.S. cities as Detroit and Newark during the long, hot summer of 1967.

Shriver Turnabout on Poverty Project Criticized

Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), Chicago, IL, Cleveland, OH

William C. Selover writes this article covering the criticism around Sargent Shriver's decision to cut funding for the poverty relief program, Child Development Group of Mississippi. Shriver, Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity, had created Head Start programs and used the CDGM as a model for programs across the country. Several accusations are rendered as cause to the cut, including Shriver giving in to political pressure from segregationist senators of Mississippi. Many believe that once again poor people had "been sacrificed to political expediency."

Democratic National Convention Platform Committee Statement

Saturday, August 1, 1964
Atlantic City, NJ, Los Angeles, CA, Mississippi (MS), SOUTH KOREA, VIETNAM, GERMANY

In this statement delivered August 22, 1964, Dr. King outlines three urgent priorities for the Committee and the party as a whole: enforcement of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, furthering voting rights and the war on poverty. He asks that the platform include a recommendation that a panel of voting rights marshals be established and that the Convention support a Bill of Rights for the Disadvantaged.

Business Reply Envelope from Morehouse College

Atlanta, GA

This document is a postcard invitation to a breakfast at Morehouse College. Dr. King served as a member on the Morehouse Board of Trustees.

Support Negro Businesses

Tuesday, November 1, 1966
Atlanta, GA

From November 1966 newspaper ad: "Support Negro Business" advertisement from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Memorandum of Agreement for Strength to Love

Monday, April 5, 1965
New York, NY

This document is a signed copy of Dr. King's Memorandum of Agreement for the Spanish edition of "Strength to Love."

Letter from MLK to Rev. L. C. Henegan

Thursday, October 9, 1958
Montgomery, AL, Texas (TX)

Dr. King thanks Rev. L. C. Henegan for his generous contribution to the Montgomery Improvement Association.

Letter from the Legislative Director to Senator Gaylord Nelson to MLK

Friday, January 28, 1966
London, England, SOUTH AFRICA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

William J. Springs writes Dr. King to send him the enclosed document entitled, "A Brief Account of Historic Connections Between Negro Americans and African in South Africa" by Mary Benson. The material is to be used in correlation with the hearing on American policy toward South Africa that will be held by Congressman Barratt O' Harra, Chairman of the Africa subcommittee.

Great Man

Gene Lyle writes the editor of a newspaper article entitled "Americans Need Some Discipline" to address unjustified criticism expressed against Dr. King. The author is certain that the article persuaded some readers that Dr. King "is to be feared and despised" for being a contributor to civil unrest. However, the writer predicts that "Dr. King will enter American history...as one of the great men of all time."

Telegram from Rev. T. A. Borders to Mrs. King

Monday, May 13, 1968
Los Angeles, CA, Atlanta, GA

Rev. Borders conveys his prayers to Mrs. King, on behalf of the First Community Baptist Church.