Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"St. Augustine, FL"

Symbolism and the Cross

Dr. King records notes on symbolism as the expression of spiritual truths.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Martin Peretz

Wednesday, October 11, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

In this letter, Ms. McDonald informs Dr. Peretz that Dr. King will be able to have lunch with him and that he will be accompanied by Reverend Andrew Young, Reverend Bernard Lee and herself.

SCLC Resolution on 1966 Civil Rights Act

Thursday, August 11, 1966
Jackson, MS, Mississippi (MS), Chicago, IL

At its Tenth Annual Convention, the SCLC Board adopts a resolution calling upon President Johnson and Congress to reverse a vote on Title IV (Open Housing) of the Civil Rights Act of 1966 that effectively permits discrimination in the sale or rental of private housing. It also faults the Administration for failure to enforce Title VI (Ban on Federal Funds for Segregated Programs and Schools) of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and for inadequate appointment of voter examiners under the 1965 Voting Rights Act.

Two Poems for MLK

The unknown author writes two poems titled, "A Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr." and "Time! Time!! Time!!!" One of the poems uses the letters of Dr. King's name for the leading word of each verse.

To Earn a Living: The Right of Every American

Tuesday, January 23, 1968
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Pennsylvania (PA), Kansas (KS), Oregon (OR)

Frederick B. Abramson, the assistant to Clifford Alexander, Jr. sends this copy of President Johnson's "To Earn a Living: the Right of Every American." Alexander, the chairman of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, in cooperation with the White House, had this message circulated to the Congress of the United States. President Johnson's message urges Congress to assist with creating jobs and providing access to job training to all Americans regardless of race or socioeconomic status.

Statement Concerning Skin Color Differences

GREECE

The author expounds on the color differences of eyes, plants, and animals to identify the faulty logic of bigotry in America.

Letter from John Lawton to MLK

Monday, May 22, 1967
Massachusetts (MA), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

John Lawton, the Chairman of the Speech Department at Boston College, informs Dr. King about his program of student speakers who discuss various controversial issues with different organizations in New England. The objective of his program is to inform the community of civil rights issues involving education and employment. Furthermore, Mr. Lawson requests a conference with Dr. King to review the program concept.

Letter form Dorothy Leeper to Muhammad Ali

Monday, May 1, 1967
Oregon (OR)

Dorothy Leeper thanks Muhammad Ali for his courage in standing by his beliefs. She also commends him and Dr. King for their stance against the Vietnam War.

Letter from Bernhard M. Auer to MLK

Monday, December 18, 1961
New York (NY), New York, NY

Bernhard Auer, publisher for Time magazine, writes Dr. King to express his gratitude for Dr. King's role in helping attain accurate information throughout the year of 1961.

Letter from MLK to Rev. S. J. Wickliffe

Saturday, March 31, 1962
Louisiana (LA)

Dr. King thanks Rev. S.J. Wickliffe for his financial contribution. Dr. King also stresses that, despite his schedule, he will have his secretary type out Rev. Wickliffe's manuscript and then review it to figure out why it has not been published.

Letter from Harry Belafonte to MLK

Thursday, February 15, 1968

Harry Belafonte expresses his deep appreciation to Dr. King for appearing with him on the "Tonight Show." Harry Belafonte concludes by thanking Dr. King for his friendship and for giving his time so generously.

Letter from Dick Thorp

Thursday, March 21, 1968
Michigan (MI)

Dick Thorp, the Choice '68 coordinator for Andrews University, writes seeking a political platform and general campaign material to aid the student association in preparation for the Choice '68 primary sponsored by Time magazine.

"Race Hate and Divisiveness"

This newspaper clipping depicts Dr. King's decision to move the civil rights movement up north as "one of grave peril to everyone concerned." The author believes that the defiance of the law could cause disaster for the Negro cause.

Education

Dr. King outlines his views on education.

Letter from Tommie Crockett to MLK

Tommie Crockett expresses his appreciation for the work of Dr. King. He explains that black people are getting tired of the nonviolence method and are beginning to embrace the term, "Black Power." He explains that blacks will no longer participate in peaceful civil rights demonstrations because, "we already done that."

A Contentious Telephone Message

Wednesday, February 16, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

William Harold Johnson contacts Dr. King to inform him of a telephone message publicizing controversial information from a number listed in Springfield, Illinois. Mr. Johnson asks Dr. King for advice on how the Council of Churches could contend the information while also mentioning that he and his associates are interested in becoming more familiar with the approach being taken in Chicago.

Washington State University Students Invite MLK to Speak

Tuesday, December 22, 1964
Washington (WA)

Timothy D. Bradbury writes Dr. King on behalf of the students of Washington State University inviting him to speak about civil rights on their campus.

Gandhi Society for Human Rights

Thursday, May 31, 1962

The Gandhi Society for Human Rights lists the names of individuals whom they would like to serve on the organization's Board of Directors in which Dr. King serves as the Honorary President.

Knowledge

Dr. King notes several New Testament passages that pertain to knowledge.

Method of Ex Abstraction

Dr. King writes notes regarding philosopher Alfred Whitehead's theory of extensive abstraction.

Letter to Mrs. H.G. Smith from MLK

Wednesday, October 13, 1965
New York (NY)

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Smith for her financial contribution to the SCLC. He briefly explains the current efforts of the SCLC and the importance of contributions.

Telegram from Elizabeth Polste to MLK

Wednesday, December 28, 1966
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

Mrs. Polste writes to Dr. King requesting a tribute for Emily Greene, who is also a Noble Peace Laureate and a founder of the Womens International League for Peace and Freedom.

Quasi Positivism

Dr. King outlines philosopher Alfred North Whitehead's views on the relationship between metaphysics and the philosophy of science. Referencing Whitehead's work "The Concept of Nature," this note card contains a quote from the original text and also paraphrases Whitehead's writings.

SCLC's Operation Breadbasket - Quarterly Report

Tuesday, February 6, 1968
Chicago, IL, Indiana (IN), Atlanta, GA, Milwaukee, WI, Cleveland, OH, Birmingham, AL, New York (NY), Los Angeles, CA, North Carolina (NC), Detroit, MI

The SCLC issued this comprehensive quarterly report on the activities of Operation Breadbasket. Operation Breadbasket focused on acquiring jobs and economic development for the Negro community through contract negotiations and boycotts.

Sin

Dr. King notes that Genesis 5:24, 6:9 and 6:22 make it clear that sin is not universal.

Christianity

Dr. King references Emil Brunner's argument on Christianity.

Letter from David H. McKillop to MLK

Thursday, November 12, 1964
SPAIN, Washington, D.C.

David McKillop informs Dr. King that the United States Consulate General in Barcelona received a letter from five Spanish citizens congratulating him for winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Draft of Speech to the National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962
Albany, GA, Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King's speech to the National Press Club in Washington D.C. was delivered a week after he was incarcerated in Albany, Georgia. This draft shows Dr. King's notes on his address about the Civil Rights Movement.

Telegram from Muhammad Ali to MLK

Thursday, November 2, 1967
Chicago, IL, Birmingham, AL

This message of support from Muhammad Ali was sent to Dr. King during his stay at the County Jail in Birmingham, Alabama.

Telegram from Zaira Singh to Pope Paul VI

Wednesday, February 14, 1968
CANADA

Mrs. Singh, a Roman Catholic, requests that Pope Paul VI becomes a hostage in Hanoi, in order to end "barbarous American bombardment."