Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"South Dakota (SD)"

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967

This New York writer castigates Dr. King and refers to him as "the worst phoney [sic] in the country."

Letter from Katharine Gunning to President Johnson

Tuesday, May 2, 1967

Katharine Gunning of New York writes President Johnson and copies various dignitaries, including Dr. King. Gunning voices her opposition to the Vietnam War, in particular the bombing campaign, which she views as an escalation of the war.

Letter to MLK from VP Hubert H. Humphrey

Wednesday, July 6, 1966

This letter from Dr. King is from Vice President Humphrey and references recommendations for personnel and employment opportunities.

Letter from J. Martin England to MLK

Thursday, September 9, 1965

J. Martin England of The Ministers and Missionaries Benefit Board of the American Baptist Convention expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's philosophy and work.

Letter from John Bolt Culbertson to MLK

Attorney John Bolt Culbertson writes Dr. King to inform him of the upcoming "Negro Spiritual Singing Convention" in Greenville, South Carolina. Mr. Culbertson explains that the previous occasion was so successful that he has decided to sponsor a similar event with the aspiration that it will be bigger than the last. He requests Dr. King's help in advertising for the Convention and indicates in postscript that he would appreciate it if Dr. King could send a representative as he did before.

Letter from Bernard Roche to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Mr. Roche asks Dr. King whether he has considered that whites not only intimidate and murder African Americans, but also each other. He argues that whites don't treat anyone any worse than they treat themselves.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, January 24, 1968

Joan Daves contacts Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, regarding the payment from the Canadian Broadcasting series in the amount of $5,000. Daves further discusses the galley of lectures that are to be checked and released by Dr. King for publication in Canada. In addition to Dr. King, Stanley Levison will also be reviewing the galleys.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. William Machesney

Tuesday, January 9, 1962

Dr. King communicates with Mrs. William Machesney of Compton, California regarding her letter about children who need help. Dr. King recommends that Machesney pursue her initiative and encourages her to solicit the support of the State of California.

Letter from John A. Blatnik to MLK

Thursday, February 27, 1964

John A. Blatnik, Chair of the Democratic Study Group, writes Dr. King thanking him for his recent letter indicating his support for Blatnik's position on civil rights.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Sylvester Webb

Monday, January 17, 1966

Dora McDonald writes Sylvester Webb of Edward Gideon Public School on behalf of Dr. King. McDonald states that Dr. King is honored that an oil portrait of himself is being presented at the school, but he regrets that he cannot be present during the ceremony. Dr. King is sending the Director of the Washington bureau of the SCLC, Reverend Walter Fauntroy, to represent him in his absence.

Letter from MLK to Congressman Charles C. Diggs, Jr.

Wednesday, July 17, 1963

Dr. King responds to the concerns of Congressman Charles Diggs regarding the March on Washington. He encloses a privately distributed memorandum about the march that Dr. King believes will answer the questions Congressman Diggs has about the march. Dr. King also briefly explains the purpose and some logistics of the march.

Handwritten Notecard about Peace

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines J Maritain's views on Peace, from the book Christianity and Democracy.

Letter from Harry H. Kruener to MLK

Thursday, October 18, 1962

Rev. Kruener invites Dr. King to speak at Plymouth Church of the Pilgrims in 1963 to commemorate the church's designation as a national landmark.

Letter from Reverend J. F. McMillan to MLK

Monday, April 5, 1965

Reverend J. F. McMillan communicates with Reverend Artic Harris to discuss the sponsoring of Mrs. King in a recital for the three Negro Churches in Toronto. They have requested Dr. King to be the principal speaker for their 140th anniversary services. Reverend McMillan informs Dr. King that he is "interested" in the non-violent movement.

Knowledge

Dr. King notes several New Testament passages that pertain to knowledge.

Outline for The Secret of Adjustment

In this sermon, Dr. King notes applicable methods used to deal with the tensions in life. It is said that "the secret to adjustment is to find contentment." King further references the experience of the Apostle Paul and what he learned in confronting this problem.

Facing Life's Inescapables

Dr. King uses an allegory regarding life to express that if an individual follows God's plan they will live an abundantly happy life.

Soren Kierkegaard

Dr. King writes about Danish philosopher Soren Kierkegaard's first stage at which men live, aesthetics.

The Voice: A Bulletin of Crozer Theological Seminary

Dr. King received a copy of this publication from Crozer, which provided alumni updates, religious articles, financial supporters, and current and upcoming seminary events.
Dr. King graduated with honors from Crozer in 1951 as class valedictorian.

Letter from Gregory Bergman to MLK

Monday, April 10, 1967

Mr. Bergman asks if he could receive a copy of Dr. King's speech given at Riverside Church. He regarded the speech as "one of the great speeches of our time."

Letter from Peggy Hutter to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

A white college student writes to Mrs. King, expressing her condolences and shock after the death of Dr. King.

Letter from Dr. Benjamin E. Mays to Dr. and Mrs. King

Monday, February 11, 1963

Benjamin E. Mays invites Dr. and Mrs. King to the Founder's Day Banquet at Morehouse College.

Letter from Leslie A. Strikes to MLK

Wednesday, December 27, 1967

Leslie Strike, Canadian Vice President of the English-Speaking Union of the Commonwealth, invites Dr. King to speak on the US Civil Rights Movement.

Telegram from Mirzo Tursun Zade to MLK

Thursday, October 10, 1963

Mirzo Tursun Zade, Chairman of the Soviet Afro-Asian Solidarity Committee, assures Dr. King that Jews enjoy equal rights with individuals of other nationalities living in the Soviet Union.

Letter from MLK to Joe C. Sullivan Jr.

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

Dr. King thanks Joe Sullivan for his previous correspondence supporting the civil rights movement and the implementation of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Dr. King expresses how he will use nonviolence against those who believe in segregation.

Dorothy Cotton telegraphs congratulations

Sunday, January 31, 1965

Dorothy Cotton, long-time colleague of Dr. King at Southern Christian Leadership Conference, congratulates Dr. King for being nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize. Cotton was one of the only non-family members to subsequently accompany Dr. King to Oslo, Norway, for the prize ceremony.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Harvey L. Gault

Friday, March 30, 1962

Dr. King informs Reverend Harvey Gault that he cannot accept the invitation to speak at Bethel A. M. E. Church. Dr. King lists some of his present and future commitments in explaining the capacity of his schedule.

Notes about Books

Dr. King opposes the existence of books that degrade the Negro image and falsely contribute to a "national brainwashing." He cites quotations from novelist John Steinbeck, which discourse on the "sacred" nature of a book.

Letter from MLK to Ohio Senator Frank J. Lausche

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King thanks Senator Frank J. Lausche (D-OH) for his support in passing the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Senator Lausche also served as Governor of Ohio.

Response Letter from Dr. King to Irene Kohlmeyer

Tuesday, December 13, 1966

Dr. King is responding to Iren Kohlmeyer's request to rebroadcast the transcripiton of the address at John Hopkins University. Dr. King gladly informs Kohlmeyer that permission is granted to do the rebroadcast.