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Robert Greene's Resolutions

Thursday, February 1, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Robert Greene, of Puerto Rican and African American ancestry, resolves to censure the State of New York. He lists a plethora of racist activities and "Orwellian deceptions" as causes.

Letter from Maddy Tolud to MLK

Wednesday, November 3, 1965
NETHERLANDS

Maddy Tolud, the President of A. R. K., thanks Dr. King for being an honorary member of their organization. Tolud assures him that their members will actively work towards equality until justice prevails.

Letter from L. M. McCoy to MLK

Thursday, February 23, 1967
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, New York, NY, BRAZIL

The Board of Missions of the Methodist Church, on behalf of the Methodist Church of Brazil, invites Dr. King to speak at the centennial celebration of Methodist missionary work in Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. McCoy also provides a brief history of the Methodist Church of Brazil.

Memorandum from Benjamin F. Payton Regarding Meredith Mississippi March

New York (NY), Memphis, TN, Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS

Benjamin F. Payton, Executive Director of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches, constructs this document as a debriefing on the Meredith Mississippi March. It is evident that the march is symbolic of the nation's struggle with racial conflict and aims to dismantle fear among African American voter registration. James Meredith, Mississippi citizen and first African American to desegregate the University of Mississippi, had organized and led the march.

Prophecy (Micah)

Dr. King sketches notes on the prophet Micah, maintaining "...that the true prophet is one who draws his inspiration...from Jehovah his God."

God

Dr. King quotes Donald M. Baillie's "God Was in Christ."

Letter from Reverend Samuel B. McKinney to MLK

Thursday, December 1, 1966
CANADA, Florida (FL)

Samuel Johnson, President of the SCLC Daytona Beach chapter, writes Dr.King to express his concerns for the current state of the organization. He urges King to make an appearance soon.

Telegram from MLK to Amsterdam News

New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL

Dr. King delivers an informative telegram to James Hicks, editor of Amsterdam News, regarding the current SCLC initiative to launch a civil rights campaign in Chicago, Illinois. The movement will direct its efforts towards school integration and eradicating the social ills that plague the Northern ghettos. Dr. King asserts "if the problems of Chicago, the Nation's second largest city, can be solved, they can be solved everywhere."

Letter from L. Alexander Harper and Charles E. Cobb to Edith M. Lerrigo

Monday, October 24, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY

Edith Lerrigo writes with concern regarding the support of the "Crisis and Commitment" call by several civil rights leaders. Lerrigo endorses Dr. King's decision to refuse his signatory on the document supporting the call, stating that this act "should have been sufficient to give pause to groups like the YWCA before jumping on the moderate bandwagon."

Sin

Dr. King references the biblical book of Numbers regarding the topic of sin.

People in Action: "The Negro Looks at America"

New York (NY), Memphis, TN, WESTERN SAHARA

Dr. King discusses the synonymous relationship between segregation and colonialism which was addressed at the Arden House Campus of Columbia University. This discussion was formally named the American Negro Leadership Conference for it covered in array of issues and involved various organizations.

Chicago Nonviolent Action Proposal

Chicago, IL, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Tennessee (TN), Indiana (IN), Louisville, KY, Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, New York (NY), New York, NY, Illinois (IL), Kentucky (KY), Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

SCLC's proposal for a nonviolent action campaign in Chicago identifies the city as the prototype for the northern urban race problem. The proposal includes a snapshot of the situation in Chicago, past approaches, SCLC?s philosophy of social change, a description of twelve different aspects of the problem of economic exploitation, and a plan and timetable for mobilizing forces. Objectives are stated for the federal, state, and local levels. SCLC proposes to work in collaboration with the Coordinating Council of Community Organizations.

The Negro

Atlanta, GA

This poem describes the strength and perseverance of the Negro during difficult times.

Memorandum to the SCLC Staff

Monday, April 1, 1968
Memphis, TN, Washington, D.C.

In a memorandum sent to the SCLC staff, just days before Dr. King's assassination, Tom Offenburger informs members of a meeting Dr. King had with his advisers. The main focus of the meeting was the march in Memphis which turned violent, as well as the future of the Poor People's Campaign. In spite of the violence, there remains plans to go to Washington and correct the economic racism the US faces.

Criticism of MLK's Methods

Thursday, August 24, 1967
Los Angeles, CA

The Author of this letter is very critical of Dr. King and accuses him of hating the white race and requests he return the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Eula Shaw to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967
Mississippi (MS), Virginia (VA)

Calling Dr. King "The Trouble Maker of the United States," Mrs. Shaw criticizes Dr. King's methods in the Civil Rights Movement. She argues that a "campaign of love is in order" rather than demonstrations.

Letter from Chas. W. Bailey to MLK

Thursday, March 2, 1967
Illinois (IL)

Chas. Bailey comments on representative Adam Clayton Powell, asserting that he cannot call himself a Christian and that he only escaped investigation because of his race. Bailey also lectures Dr. King for defending Powell.

Letter from Ralph D. Abernathy to Homer A. Jack

Thursday, September 2, 1965
Boston, MA, Atlanta, GA

Rev. Ralph Abernathy submits a check on behalf of the SCLC to Homer Jack of the Unitarian Universalist Association to be donated to the Jimmie Lee Jackson Memorial Fund. The money will be used to purchase a new home for Jackson's parents and to finance the education for Jackson's sister. Jimmie Lee Jackson was murdered by a Alabama State Trooper while trying to protect his mother and grandfather from a beating during a march melee in Marion, Alabama. Jackson's death initiated the push for a march from Selma to Montgomery.

Letter from A White Man to MLK

Saturday, February 5, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, ISRAEL

Writing under a pseudonym, "A White Man" lectures Dr. King about the race related conditions of the Chicago Park District. He or she calls this area "Heaven on Earth Surrounded by a Ghetto."

Letter from MLK to R. B. Taylor

Wednesday, October 13, 1965
Oklahoma (OK)

Dr. King thanks Dr. R. B. Taylor for his generous contribution to the SCLC. King discusses how the funds are allocated to assist with voter registration, education and finding jobs for blacks.

Letter to the Editor of the New York Times

Monday, April 17, 1967
New York, NY

On April 15, 1967, a massive antiwar demonstration was held in New York City. Demonstrators marched from Central Park to the United Nations building where they were addressed by prominent political activists such as Dr. King, Floyd McKissick, Stokely Carmichael, James Bevel, Jan Berry Crumb, and Dr. Benjamin Spock. In this letter, a veteran and demonstrator writes the Editor of the New York Times to express his critical view of an article that reported on the event.

Hosea

Dr. King writes notes regarding the prophet Hosea and his views of God.

Letter from Walter W. Windisch to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

Walter W. Windisch writes to Dr. King to express his gratitude for the Peace March led by Dr. King in New York City. He also expresses his desire to be a part of any upcoming demonstrations.

Letter from Mary Ann Quilter to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968
Ohio (OH), Atlanta, GA

Ms. Quilter informs Dr. King of a political event taking place on campus and asks him for any campaign literature he can provide and a picture of himself.

Letter from Prince Johannes of Bohemia to MLK

Sunday, December 17, 1967
Washington, D.C., SWITZERLAND, NETHERLANDS, New York, NY

Prince Johannes, claimant to the throne of Bohemia, requests Dr. King's participation in the Presidium of the World Government.

Photo of MLK and Mr. David

Jackson, MS

Mr. David sends Dr. King a picture displaying the two outside a Jackson, Mississippi Holiday Inn.

Letter from Irv Kupcinet to MLK

Monday, August 14, 1967
Chicago, IL

Irv Kupcinet, a writer for the Chicago Sun-Times, encloses a copy of his special column including Dr. King's power quote on NBC's Meet the Press. The interview was in direct correlation to the riots that occured in many urban cities.

Telegram from Teamsters Vice President Harold Gibbons to MLK

Missouri (MO), Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS)

International Brotherhood of Teamsters Vice President Harold Gibbons conveys his support to Dr. King for a statewide Mississippi boycott. Gibbons congratulates Dr. King on being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize.

Bob Fitch Passes Letter to MLK Through Secretary McDonald

Bob Fitch makes mention of a letter that he feels would be of interest to Dr. King.

Support from Lawyer Grenville Clark to Attorney General Nicholas Kstzenbech

Thursday, July 28, 1966
New Hampshire (NH), Washington, D.C., New York (NY), New York, NY

In this letter to U.S. Attorney General Nicholas Kstzenbech, Grenville Clark requests a reply to Dr. King's "devastating" public statement in the New York Times about proper enforcement of the 1965 voting rights law.