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Statement by MLK

Dr. King releases a public statement addressing the issues regarding the conflict in Vietnam.

Letter from Thomas H. Henderson to Rev. Wyatt T. Walker

Tuesday, February 20, 1962

Thomas Henderson, president of Virginia Union University, instructs Reverend Wyatt T. Walker to provide Dr. King with the check from the office of Mr. C. C. Grant.

Telegram from Abraham Heschel to MLK

Thursday, November 2, 1967

Abraham Heschel tells Dr. King that he has a deep identification with the goals that Dr. King is dedicated to and offers him encouragement.

Newspaper Clippings on Vietnam, January 1968

Wednesday, January 3, 1968

This document is a collage of newspaper clippings from the New York Time and the Washington Post on union leaders' positions on Vietnam. The boxed quotation is excerpted from a recent AFL-CIO convention.

Memorandum from MLK

Dr. King regrets his absence at the Unity Council meeting and apologizes for his inability to sign a statement because it disagreed with his methods of civil disobedience.

Letters Between MLK and Max Dean

Thursday, June 1, 1967

Dr. King sends a letter out to supporters, updating them on the progress made through the Civil Rights Movement. Dr. King also informs supporters that the work is far from done and asks for support. Writing on the back of Dr. King's letter, Max Dean informs Dr. King that his most important priority is an immediate and unconditional withdrawal from Vietnam. This is despite that Dean has "great respect" for Dr. King and the SCLC.

American Clergymen's Committee for Vietnamese War Relief

Monday, December 4, 1967

The American Clergymen's Committee for Vietnamese War Relief requests that Dr. King join them in sending medical supplies to North Vietnam. They also explain the difficulties they are receiving from the government to obtain a Treasury Department License which would enable them to assist in the war relief. Lastly, the committee informs Dr. King of how other churches have made generous contributions to help with relief for the Vietnam War.

Letter from Jack Michlin to George C. Wallace

Thursday, June 8, 1967

Jack Michlin criticizes former Alabama Governor George Wallace for making misleading statements about the American and Confederate slave trade on "The Mike Douglas Show."

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, November 20, 1964

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, suggests a discussion concerning future writing plans. She mentions the possibility of publishing a collection that would include several of Dr. King's speeches and writings, among them the March on Washington address and the Oslo speech.

Check from the SCLC "Crusade for Citizenship" Program

Friday, December 31, 1965

Jimmy Wilson was issued this check from the Crusade for Citizenship organization.

MLK Thanks a Contributing Author

Dr. King writes to Mr. Morrow thanking him for sending a written manuscript of Marrow's new book. He apologizes for being unable to fully assist him in his writing endeavors.

Statement From MLK In Response To Article Alleging Communist Ties

Thursday, July 25, 1963

This press release issued by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference features a Statement by Dr. King responding to allegations that he and the SCLC has communist ties. Dr. King argues that the SCLC is grounded in the Christian non-violent movement with the intent of reform, wherease communism leads to violent revolution.

MLK Address to the United Neighborhood Houses of New York

Tuesday, December 6, 1966

Dr. King delivers this address to the United Neighborhood Houses of New York. He expresses that a lack of job opportunities, education and community economic development contributes to the growing levels of poverty in the United States.

History

Dr. King provides the pessimist's perception of history.

God's Omniscience

Dr. King references the Biblical Book of Psalms regarding God's omniscience. King notes that God knows everything before it is even done. This, however, does not have an effect on human free will.

Memo on Strategy of the Integration Movement

An anonymous writer pens a comprehensive strategy that focuses on achieving racial integration. Within the text of the document, the writer identifies various political, social and economical developments that are needed in order to end racially stemmed inequalities for African Americans.

Letter from Dorothy O. Bucklin to MLK

Wednesday, November 27, 1963

Mrs. Bucklin invites Dr. King to deliver a series of sermons highlighting his biblical preference and his experiences with the SCLC. The conference will host affiliates of the American Baptist Home Mission Societies.

Community Service Committee Presents MLK

The Community Service Committee of Oakwood College presents Dr. King as its guest speaker in an upcoming event.

Letter from Clyde Rembert to MLK

Friday, June 2, 1967

Clyde Rembert, a broadcaster from KRLD-Radio and KRLD-TV, writes Dr. King inviting him to the radio show. Rembert seeks a response from Dr. King regarding a derogatory statement made by Dr. Criswell concerning King's anti-Vietnam war stance.

Biographical Sketches of Leaders of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

These are biographical sketches of various leaders who were involved in the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedoms. These distinguished individuals were involved in organizations that focused on equality and nonviolence.

More State Funds Urged for Negro Banks

Monday, January 23, 1967

This article reports about Operation Breadbasket's request for more funding from the State of Illinois to further its economic development efforts in the African American community.

Letter from Kathleen Reid to MLK

Monday, October 9, 1967

Kathleen Reed, the editor of Alert Catholic, writes to Dr. King enclosing the most recent copy of the publication. The Newsletter of the National Council of Catholic Men features a quote by Dr. King to President Johnson which stated "the conditions which you so bravely set out to remedy when you entered office" have not changed.

Letter From John Payak to Mrs. King & Family

Tuesday, April 16, 1968

John Payak offers condolences from a religious perspective to Mrs. King and family.

Request for a Speaker Choice '68

Tuesday, March 19, 1968

Lonnie Longmire, representative of Baylor Universtiy, request that Dr. King suggest speakers that support his presidential candidacy for the Choice '68 project.

Letter from Roslyn Wilkins to MLK

Friday, June 11, 1965

Roslyn Wilkins of California asks Dr. King for his opinion on interracial marriage. Wilkins asserts that her mother would rather her marry a Japanese man because, as Wilkins is white, they are closer in color.

Letter from Mr. & Mrs. Ericson to MLK

Thursday, February 22, 1968

Mr. and Mrs. Ericson are expressing their immense support for Dr. King and his humanitarianism. They stress the importance to look beyond the racial lines and focus on a more cohesive world community.

Correspondence from Maude L. Ballou to Miss Frehse - Apr 29, 1960

Friday, April 29, 1960

Here Maude L. Ballou is responding to Miss Frehse letter concerning questions about MLK's book "Stride Towards Freedom." Miss Ballou states that MLK's time schedule is too full to respond to her questions.

Letter from Ernestine Comegys to SCLC

Monday, April 5, 1965

Ernestine Comegys writes the SCLC in hopes of obtaining commemorative plates of Dr. King containing his biography on the back. Comegys plans to sell the plates at her church.

The Commercial Appeal: But No Services

Sunday, January 7, 1968

This photo and accompanying caption relate the story of Dr. King and an associate clerical organization conducting a silent vigil at Arlington National Cemetery after being blocked judicially from holding a memorial service in that venue.

Letter from Marcel Bernfeld to MLK

Tuesday, June 16, 1964

Mr. Bernfeld writes Dr. King, letting him know that he published some of his work. He also asks Dr. King's permission to publish the "Letter from Birmingham Jail," in its entirety, with an introduction and notes. He encloses copies of his own speech for Dr. King's reading pleasure and expresses his well-wishes in closing.