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"South Carolina (SC)"

Support Letter to MLK

Thursday, February 1, 1962

A Jewish man sends Dr. King a letter expressing his support for "Stride Toward Freedom" and informing Dr. King about his connection to the black community.

Telegram from A. Philip Randolph to MLK

A. Philip Randolph congratulates Dr. King on the statement he made on "Face the Nation."

Letter from Eldredge Hiller to MLK

Friday, June 4, 1965

Mr. Eldredge, Executive Director of The American Association of Fund-Raising Counsel, writes Dr. King to express criticism of a statement made in an SCLC fact leaflet regarding "commercial fund raisers." Eldredge states that, while many people in his Association are usually sympathetic to Dr. King's views, the "distasteful" sentiment is exception.

Letter from Louise M. Meriwether to MLK

Tuesday, March 19, 1968

Louise M. Meriwether requests an endorsement from Dr. King in protesting the filming of the book "The Confessions of Nat Turner" written by William Styron.

Miracle

Dr. King quotes statements from Harry E. Fosdick's "Modern Use of the Bible" regarding the definition of a miracle.

Letter from MLK to Richard Huett

Monday, February 25, 1963

Dr. King informs Richard Huett, Editor of Laurel Editions and Delta Books, that he cannot write a book for Huett due to other writing responsibilities and time commitments.

SCLC News Release: Alabama Primary

This SCLC news release lists African American candidates running for elective office in an Alabama primary.

Letter from Omer Allison to MLK

Saturday, August 19, 1967

Mr. Allison expresses dissatisfaction with Dr. King's representation of the Negro race, the church and the Kingdom of God.

Letter From A. S. Raman to MLK

Thursday, December 8, 1966

In this letter, Raman invites Dr. King to be a part of a discussion in the anniversary issue of the Indian Republic by contributing about 800 to the article.

Letter from Ruth Olsen to Dora McDonald

Monday, July 6, 1964

Ruth Olsen of St. Ansgar's Lutheran Church writes Dora McDonald requesting 30 copies of Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait."

Newsletter from The Knights of the Confederacy

The Knights of the Confederacy, a student organization that promoted segregation in public schools, used this flyer to recruit students who were aligned with their goal of protecting "white rights."

WBTV Editorial: "King's Bedfellows"

Monday, February 19, 1968

The content of this document suggested that Dr. King break ties with leaders Stokley Carmichael and H. Rap Brown, due to their stance on violence as a weapon. At the bottom of this document, is an invitation for Dr. King, H. Rap Brown and Stokley Carmichael to respond.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Thursday, August 6, 1964

Joan Daves requests clarification regarding Dr. King's schedule.

Letter from Valentina Borremans to MLK

Wednesday, April 12, 1967

Valentina Borremans, Director of CIDOC, invites Dr. King to their upcoming summer seminar that will be attended by North American and Latin American intellectuals and leaders concerned with social change.

Congratulations to MLK from Michael Engel

Saturday, December 19, 1964

In this letter dated December 19, 1964, Michael Engel sends his congratulations to Dr.King for winning the Nobel Peace Prize. He also asks for a picture of Dr.King for his scrapbook.

Dictator

Dr. King reveals the definition of a dictator according to Plato.

Letter from Robert Kyser to MLK

Thursday, March 14, 1968

Robert Keyser, Coordinator of Choice '68 at Graceland College, writes Dr. King requesting campaign materials, just three weeks before his assassination. Choice '68 was the Time Magazine sponsored collegiate primary for the Presidential election in which Dr. King and Dr. Spock were encouraged to run as a ticket.

Telegram from LD Reddick to MLK

Saturday, October 22, 1960

In this letter, LD Reddick tells Dr. King that he is a magnificent example to other leaders. Reddick then tells Dr. King to ask the presidential candidates to state their views more specifically.

Letter from C.A. Echols to MLK

Thursday, July 1, 1965

C.A. Echols requests a copy of Dr. King's publication "The Time for Freedom Has Come" to be included in his upcoming thesis "Thoreau and Civil Disobedience."

Letter from Leonard Chadwick to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Chadwick, a student at Lincoln school of Berkeley, California, offers encouragement to Dr. King and his continuous efforts for social good.

Telegram from Dover Beale and Theodore Patterson to MLK

Monday, September 22, 1958

Dover Beale and Theodore Patterson send well wishes and hopes for a full recovery to Dr. King.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An anonymous individual sends Dr. King newspaper clippings showing African-Americans participating in looting and violence. Dr. King is asked to review the articles and offer comments via television.

Certificate Honoring MLK

Friday, March 31, 1967

This certificate serves to honor MLK for his contributions "in the field of racial relations."

March for Peace Flyer

This flyer advertises the March for Peace. The event, which was organized in Atlanta and held on Hiroshima Day, focused on ending the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Frieda E. Isenberg to MLK

Monday, March 19, 1962

Frieda Isenberg collected money from various friends and co-workers to support the cause of freedom in the South. The total contribution given was $22.00.

The Dimensions of a Complete Life

Dr. King begins this sermon with the story of John's first sight of the holy city of Jerusalem. He uses the story to emphasize "an eternal truth which we must forever recognize, and that is that life at its best and life as it should be is the life that is complete on all sides." This famous sermon had been drafted several times and also takes up the name "Three Dimensions of A Complete Life."

Coretta Scott King's SCLC Contributors Card

This card reminds Mrs. King of her previous year's contribution and solicits her support for another year.

God

Dr. King elaborates on Thomas Aquinas' views on the existence of God.

1966 Notes on the War

Dr. King annotates a speech to address his concerns about the war in Vietnam and his duties as a civil rights leader.

SCLC Constituent to Rev. Abernathy

Thursday, May 2, 1968

This letter, originating from New York City in the aftermath of Dr. King's assassination, is from a supporter who is inquiring about the purchase of items relating to Dr. King's correspondence.