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"South Carolina (SC)"

Letter from the International Convention of Christian Churches to MLK

Friday, October 7, 1966

The International Convention of Christian Churches communicates their appreciation for Dr. King's participation in the evening panel on "The Churches and the Struggle for Human Freedom, Dignity and Brotherhood." The executive secretary informs Dr. King of the enclosed honorarium for his contribution to this panel discussion.

MLK Statement on Church Groundbreaking

Monday, February 4, 1963

Dr. King speaks on the burning of churches in Dawson, Georgia, stating that this act is a symbol of the "tragic depth to which men and women can sink when they are guided by prejudice and when they are filled with hatred."

Letter from Leroy R. Weiner

Monday, July 18, 1966

Leroy R. Weiner writes Mr. Harry Belafonte addressing a recent appeal made on behalf of the organization SNCC.

Religion

This document is a notecard titled "Religion," in which Dr. King expounds on John Dewey's definition of religion in "A Common Faith" as a "purely ethical meaning" of religion.

Sin

Dr. King writes about sin, according to Jeremiah 31: 29, 30.

Letter from David M. Wallace to Dora McDonald

Monday, February 6, 1967

David Wallace writes Dora McDonald and attaches contributions from Negro businessmen involved with Chicago's Operation Breadbasket.

Letter from James Dombrowski to MLK

Saturday, November 13, 1965

A letter to Dr. and Mrs. King, from Mr. James Dombrowski, thanks them for their support and contribution to SCEF.

King's Viet Stand Has Cost Him Some Financial Support

The Associated Press releases this article acknowledging the lack of funding forwarded to the SCLC because of Dr. King's views on Vietnam. The article also discusses how various other civil rights organizations have received more contributions based on the financial support drawn away from Dr. King. However, the article notes that Dr. King emphasizes the imperative link between the civil rights and peace movements.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dick Smyth

Tuesday, March 26, 1963

Dora McDonald informs Dick Smyth that Dr. King is unable to accept the speaking engagement at the moment but they will contact him once Dr. King has an engagement in the area.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Benjamin E. Mays

Monday, May 4, 1964

Wyatt Tee Walker informs Benjamin E. Mays that an advance copy of Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait," is being sent in appreciation of Dr. Mays' support.

Letter from Erma Hughes to Dora McDonald

Saturday, March 14, 1964

Ms. Hughes, college President and Founder, advises Ms. McDonald to inform Dr. King that he should anticipate numerous invitations after an article appears in the newspaper announcing him as a guest at her college.

Letter of Condolence from Jerry K. Bolton

Thursday, April 4, 1968

Mr. Bolton expresses his heartfelt sympathy for the "unjust loss" of Dr. King.

Edwin B. Allaire's Letter to MLK

Wednesday, April 26, 1967

Mr. Allaire informs Dr. King that there are many individuals who would vigorously support him in becoming a presidential candidate.

Alabama Council Newsletter

Amidst a battle between federal and states' rights, Reverend Hughes discusses the arrival of the Commission on Civil Rights and its intended purpose in the state of Alabama.

Letter from Marion Arnold to MLK

Wednesday, July 19, 1967

Marion Arnold, chairman of the Ecumenical Mission Committee of Broadway United Church of Christ, expresses thanks for the copy of Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

Letter from MLK to Donna Mitchell

Thursday, November 7, 1963

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for a previous letter sent by Donna Mitchell. He shares the gratification of knowing that young people are aware of "the changing world in which we live." King concludes by stating that correspondence from youth is always welcomed.

MLK Outline of Biblical Texts

Dr. King outlines the Old Testament biblical book of Samuel and records information regarding the lives of Saul and David.

Draft of Speech On Passage of 1965 Voting Rights Act

Dr. King discusses the prevalence of racial issues in society. Discrimination and segregation still occur but through means in which the government has not declared unconstitutional. One of the main problems discussed was housing discrimination. Many African Americans were forced to live in slum housing in bad areas because they were not able to buy a house in the "white neighborhoods." Dr. King states that this type of social injustice cannot continue if the nation wants to progress.

Letter from John R. Yungblut to CSK

Monday, August 2, 1965

Mr. Yungblut of Quaker House, writes Mrs. King to inquire whether the King Children may be interested in participating in a youth dramatics program.

Handwritten Thank You Letter From MLK

Dr. King expresses his gratitude for contributions made to the SCLC, and informs the reader of the results of recent studies regarding illegitimate birth rates among negroes as opposed to whites.

Letter from John A. McDermott to Chicago Daily News

Friday, June 30, 1967

John McDermott anticipates discrimination in housing and job opportunities as a result of a proposed federal project for a nuclear power plant in Illinois. Ideally, The Weston Project should create equal opportunities for both black and white Americans. McDermott expresses concern considering the current conditions of racial injustice that exists in Illinois.

Letter Requesting Help From MLK

Wednesday, April 20, 1966

An unidentified North Carolina man writes Dr. King requesting urgent assistance involving his brutal arrest by a state trooper. According to the man, the trooper physically assaulted him during detainment and ended up breaking two ribs. However, his other peers, mainly Negro, are too afraid to speak up about this police brutality case.

Letter from MLK to Arline Young

Thursday, March 22, 1962

Dr. King responds to Ms. Young's previous letter that discussed the difficulty of engaging people in voter registration efforts.

J. M. Douglas Expresses Concern about the Influx of Cuban Imigrants

Wednesday, January 17, 1968

J. M. Douglas writes Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. to express his concern for the influx of Cubans in America. He fears that jobs for young Negros are at stake and suggests that Dr. King include the concern in his demands for the March on Washington.

Letter from H. Robert Gemmer to MLK

Thursday, December 1, 1966

The Rev. H. Robert Gemmer, of the Utica Area Council of Churches, donates one share of Commonwealth Life Insurance Company stock to Dr. King in support of the SCLC.

Letter from Walter Davis, Jr. to MLK

Monday, April 11, 1966

Walter Davis, Jr. encloses a donation to SCLC sent all the way from the Congo. Mr. Davis expresses, "Of particular interest to us is the way in which you and your organization are able to get the participation of many groups who are interested in justice and social reform."

Letter from Karen Goldberg to MLK

Tuesday, December 3, 1963

Karen Goldberg, a twelve-year-old in a religious school, requests some biographical information about Dr. King for a group project.

Letter from Paul Anderson to MLK

Paul Anderson writes Dr. King requesting to know his association with Adam Clayton Powell.

Women Strike for Peace: How Can You Be Silent?

Thursday, April 1, 1965

This newsletter exemplifies the struggle that Vietnamese children faced during the war. It also urges many to protest in order to prevent young children from dying.

Letter from Courtland Cox to MLK

Wednesday, September 23, 1964

Courtland Cox of SNCC writes Dr. King reminding him that several of their members are away in Africa and informs him that Mr. Lewis will not be able to attend his convention.