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"South Carolina (SC)"

Poster: Victory Baptist Church Banquet

Los Angeles, CA

This poster announces Victory Baptist Church's 24th anniversary banquet, with Dr. King as guest speaker. Dr. King spoke at this Los Angeles church on June 25, 1967.

Remarks by the Right Rev. Richard S. Emrich

Friday, June 28, 1957
Detroit, MI, Montgomery, AL

This address accompanies the awarding of the Springarn Medal to Dr. King. The Medal is presented annually by the NAACP for Outstanding Achievement by a Negro Citizen.

Telegram from UFT President Albert Shanker to MLK

Wednesday, September 13, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Albert Shanker expresses his appreciation to Dr. King for his support throughout the tumultuous 1967 education crisis in New York City.

Letter from Richard Schweiker to MLK

Tuesday, October 5, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Representative Richard Schweiker offers his gratitude to Dr. King for his support for home rule in the District of Columbia. He, however, states that the legislation has been defeated on the floor of Congress. Schweiker urges persistence to see that home rule is established in Washington, D.C.

Letter from High School Student to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967
Mississippi (MS)

Sheila Gavin is a high school student writing to Dr. King to inquire about his choice to be a part of the civil rights movement.

God

Dr. King describes Psalms 135:5 as henotheism: belief in a god without denying the existence of other gods. Because God is the only one worthy of worship, King concludes that the Hebrews were practical monotheists.

Letter from MLK to Harry Wachtel, Esq.

Tuesday, November 22, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY, South Carolina (SC)

Dr. King updates Attorney Harry Wachtel about a nonviolence workshop that took place at the Penn Center in Frogmore, South Carolina.

Letter from Mary E. Peabody to MLK

Thursday, June 29, 1967
St. Augustine, FL, Florida (FL), Boston, MA, Cambridge, MA

Mary E. Peabody writes a letter requesting that Dr. King send her a copy of one of his books along with a signature. She also informs him of her opinion on education and the racial issues the city of Boston faces.

Letter from John B. Morris to Alfred Hardman

Wednesday, July 3, 1963
Atlanta, GA

The Executive Director of the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity writes the Lovett School Board of Trustees regarding the decision not to accept Negroes. Reverend John Morris informs Reverend Alfred Hardman that the church does not agree with the decision and will protest it. Dr. King's son, Martin Luther King III was one of the students not admitted into the school.

Operation Breadbasket: A Statement by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Tuesday, December 12, 1967
Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH

Dr. King announces an agreement made with Pick-n-Pay Supermarkets that will open numerous jobs for the Negro community. The

Letter from Nelson Rockefeller to MLK

Wednesday, February 5, 1964
New York (NY), New Hampshire (NH), Atlanta, GA

Nelson Rockefeller writes to Dr. King hoping to have lunch with his family at Pocantico Hills. His intent is to raise funds for the Urban League of Westchester County and the SCLC.

The Domestic Impact of the War in America

Saturday, November 11, 1967
VIETNAM, CHINA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., San Francisco, CA

In his address to the National Labor Leadership Assembly for Peace, Dr. King parallels the war in Vietnam to the injustice and violence inflicted on urban dwelling American Negroes "goaded and infuriated by discrimination and neglect." King implores Congress and the Johnson Administration to reassess the nation's domestic priorities and institute anti-poverty programs, so that the Great Society does not deteriorate into a "troubled and confused society."

Letter from Mr. Joseph Mermel to Coretta Scott King

Thursday, March 18, 1965
New York, NY

In this letter to Mrs. King, Mr. Mermel informs her that a sculptress, Sally Stengel, would like to make a sculpture of Dr. King, given he is one of "two outstanding leaders of the Negro race."

Letter from Bengt Bjerke to Dora McDonald

Thursday, December 10, 1964
Oslo, Norway, NORWAY, Stockholm, Sweden

Bengt Bjerke from the Legal Counsel of the Nobel Foundation informs Dora McDonald that a signature is needed for Dr. King's copyright assignment form for his Nobel Lecture.

Telegram from Teamsters Vice President Harold Gibbons to MLK

Missouri (MO), Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS)

International Brotherhood of Teamsters Vice President Harold Gibbons conveys his support to Dr. King for a statewide Mississippi boycott. Gibbons congratulates Dr. King on being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize.

Agenda of the General Committee of the Department of Racial and Cultural Relations

Thursday, January 26, 1961
Tennessee (TN), Nashville, TN, New York, NY, New York (NY), Texas (TX)

This document is an agenda and lists meeting minutes regarding the approval of actions, nominations, budget, and miscellaneous items for the Department of Racial and Cultural Relations.

Letter from JohnFischer to MLK Regarding an Article in Harper's Magazine

Wednesday, September 26, 1962
New York (NY), Albany, GA

John Fischer of Harpers Magazine informs Dr. King that the Albany Georgia article will not be published in the upcoming edition.

Royalties Summary to MLK from J. Campe

Wednesday, October 5, 1966
New York (NY)

Here J. Campe itemizes the income from Dr. King's various publications including "Why We Can't Wait," "Stride Toward Freedom" and "Strength to Love", for a total of $2202.26.

Gregory the Great (540-604)

ITALY

Dr. King outlines historical information regarding Gregory the Great otherwise known as Pope Gregory I.

MLK Address to the United Neighborhood Houses of New York

Tuesday, December 6, 1966
New York, NY, New York (NY), VIETNAM

Dr. King delivers this address to the United Neighborhood Houses of New York. He expresses that a lack of job opportunities, education and community economic development contributes to the growing levels of poverty in the United States.

Letter from Florida Writer to President Lyndon Johnson on True Equality

Florida (FL), Washington, D.C., Detroit, MI

This letter from a Florida resident to President Johnson expresses the writer's views on the nation's racial challenges.

Walter Winchell: American Talking Back

VIETNAM, Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, California (CA), New York (NY), New York, NY, Texas (TX), Philadelphia, PA

In this article, Walter Winchell provides excerpts of news articles and adds his own commentary to each. Following an excerpt about Dr. King's having a conference to coordinate civil disobedience activities, Winchell urges his leaders to write to Dr. King and "tell him to stop posing as a Man of Peace and 'fess up that his big "act" is causing more trouble than Ho Chi Mihn." Other recipients of Winchell's attention in this column include President Lyndon B. Johnson.

Telegram from MLK to Rabbi Abraham Heschel

Wednesday, April 5, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM

Dr. King writes Rabbi Heschel indicating that he will happily serve as a sponsor of the nationwide campaign to end bombings in Vietnam.

MLK Statement to Time Magazine

Friday, January 12, 1962

In this statement to Time Magazine, Dr. King responds to President John F. Kennedy's call for new civil rights legislation.

Letter from Jill Chisholm to MLK

Sunday, January 22, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Johannesburg, South Africa

Ms. Chisholm, from South Africa, informs Dr. King of her temporary stay in the United States to research the non-violent movement and work of SCLC. She request to meet with Dr. King to discuss his work in Atlanta, GA and Chicago, IL.

Antiwar Slogans

Tuesday, March 21, 1967
New York, NY, VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The Spring Mobilization Committee issues a list of official slogans for Vietnam War protest placards. Groups and individuals who intend to protest are asked to use these slogans on their self-made placards with the phrase "STOP THE WAR NOW" printed at the bottom.

Saturday Review: Behind the Selma March

Saturday, April 3, 1965
Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King describes the events surrounding the Selma-Montgomery Civil Rights March of 1965.

Letter from Clarence Jones to MLK

Friday, May 15, 1964
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

Clarence Jones writes Dr. King requesting commentary concerning "The World March Towards Human Rights: Luncheon on May 28, 1964."

Memorandum from Carole to Dora McDonald

Thursday, June 22, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., Detroit, MI, Chicago, IL, New York, NY, New York (NY), Cleveland, OH

Carole requests that Ms. McDonald channels several correspondence to Dr. King from those who will participate in a Convention.

Telegram to MLK from Treasurer W. E. Shortridge

Thursday, August 9, 1962
Albany, GA, Birmingham, AL

Members of the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights send Dr. King encouraging words during his sentence at Albany City Jail.