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"South Carolina (SC)"

MLK Statement at Pacem In Terris II Convocation

Monday, May 29, 1967

Dr. King's introductory remarks at the Pacem In Terris II Convocation critiques the United States' involvement in Vietnam.

Letter from MLK to Mr. D.A. Edwards

Friday, May 5, 1967

This letter was sent to Mr. Edwards expressing Dr. King's appreciation for his contribution to the Civil Rights cause.

Letter from Alice Mary Hilton and Kathryn Anne Hilton Hayward to MLK

Wednesday, April 12, 1967

Kathryn, a young American girl, writes a letter to Dr. King expressing her sympathy for a girl in the Vietnam War. Kathryn sends twelve cents to help the girl in the war smile. Kathryn's mother also expresses her concern about the war.

The Martin Luther King Column

Dr. King addresses his concerns about the rise of anti-Semitism in Germany.

Letter from MLK to Carey B. Preston

Thursday, September 3, 1964

In this letter, Dr. King expresses his appreciation to the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority for making his visit to their convention enjoyable and for also contributing $1500.00 to the SCLC.

Letter from Susan Agrest to MLK

Tuesday, January 2, 1968

Susan Agrest of Harcourt, Brace & World, Inc. requests Dr. King's permission to reprint "Letter from Birmingham City Jail" in a book that will be published.

Letter from Dr. Earl C. Jackson, Sr. to MLK

Wednesday, August 7, 1963

Earl Jackson writes Dr. King requesting feedback regarding his upcoming speaking engagement as one of three keynote speakers during a large conference in Delaware.

Letter from MLK to Norman Baugher

Thursday, August 15, 1963

Dr. King conveys his support to Norman Baugher for the Church of the Brethren's past correspondence regarding publicizing the philosophy of nonviolence.

Religion

Dr. King cites Edward S. Ames' beliefs regarding religion.

Letter from Solomon and Dorothy Zeltzer to Dr. and Mrs. King

Wednesday, April 26, 1967

The Zeltzer family send warm regards and support to the King family.

Letter from Louise Andrews Sims to MLK

Thursday, October 18, 1962

Louise Andrews Sims asks Dr. King to consider providing assistance to the American Friend's Service Committee by setting aside one week for aspeaking engagement in October or November of 1963. Alternate dates could be in January through April of 1964.

Letter from Representative Carl Perkins to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

Congressman Carl Perkins informs Dr. King that he supports fighting against the McCulloch Amendment to the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Telegram from United States House of Representatives to MLK

Thursday, March 25, 1965

The United States House of Representatives congratulates Dr. King and other leaders on their march to Montgomery, Alabama. They believe that the march will be recognized as the "beginning of genuine democracy" in American history.

Letter from Jan A. Hatch & Norman A. Bacon to MLK

Tuesday, February 23, 1965

Jan Hatch and Norman Bacon, white citizens of Athol, Massachusetts, write Dr. King inquiring about how they can contribute to the fight for racial equality. They inform him of the non-existent Negro population in Athol and request information on how to join the NAACP if it is conducive to their movement and financial limitations.

Letter from Marry Gottesfeld to MLK

Wednesday, August 7, 1963

Mary Gottesfeld, president of the Community and Social Agency Employees Union, writes Dr. King expressing pleasure in contributing more to Dr. King's organization. She also reminds him of the thousands that are behind his cause.

Letter From Roberta S. Felton to Miss Dora McDonald

Thursday, March 1, 1962

Roberta S. Felton writes to Dora McDonald in recognition and thanks for the letter she received.

Letter from Boston University Graduate School

Friday, October 9, 1953

Ms. Bessie A. Ring, a representative from the Boston University Graduate School registrar's office, highlights and outlines various changes that have been made to the leaflet on the "Preparation of the Dissertation for the Ph.D. Degree."

Letter from Benjamin Brown to MLK

Wednesday, September 15, 1965

Benjamin Brown, literary editor for CORE, thanks Dr. King for his previous letter regarding the "CORE Guide" publication. Brown asks that CORE be granted permission to reprint copies of Dr. King's past speeches.

Letter From Joan Daves to Hermine Popper

Thursday, July 20, 1967

Joan Daves informs Hermine Popper of an issue regarding writing credit for Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go from Here."

Letter from Gunter Kohlhaw to MLK

Friday, October 14, 1966

Dr. Gunter B. Kohlhaw shares the memorable experience of hearing Dr. King deliver a sermon while attending Sunday service at Ebenezer Baptist Church. Kohlhaw also requests copies of Dr. King's collection of sermons.

SCLC Annual Conference Registration

Monday, September 11, 1961

Wyatt Tee Walker, Executive Director of the SCLC, sent this letter to associates of the SCLC prior to the 1961 Annual Convention held in Nashville, Tennessee. The letter included registration cards for the event with a request to RSVP immediately.

Letter from L. Alexander Harper and Charles E. Cobb to Edith M. Lerrigo

Monday, October 24, 1966

Edith Lerrigo writes with concern regarding the support of the "Crisis and Commitment" call by several civil rights leaders. Lerrigo endorses Dr. King's decision to refuse his signatory on the document supporting the call, stating that this act "should have been sufficient to give pause to groups like the YWCA before jumping on the moderate bandwagon."

Letter from Charles H. K. to MLK

Wednesday, August 25, 1965

Charles H. K., from the University of Montreal, encloses a financial contribution and informs Dr. King that he is moving to Canada and would like information on how to continue his contributions.

Atlanta Workshop in Nonviolence Newsletter

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

This newsletter, Volume I Number 4, is published by Henry and Sue Bass of Atlanta. They write about the Atlanta Peace Parade, an anti-Vietnam protest to take place on August 6, 1967. The Atlanta Peace Parade would become the south's first major peace parade, about which the Basses write President Johnson was worried, calling for counter-demonstrations.

Telegram from Sylvester Nichols to Mrs. King

Friday, May 3, 1968

Mrs. King received many telegrams, following the assassination of Dr. King. This telegram, in particular, came from Sylvester Nichols and the members of the Brooklyn branch of the National Association of Negro Musicians. The association wanted to extend sympathy to the King family and to inform Mrs. King that they would continue to live out Dr. King's principles.

Telegram from MLK to Robert Kennedy

Dr. King requests a meeting with Attorney General Robert Kennedy regarding voter registration.

MLK Statement before Platform Committee of the RNC

Tuesday, July 7, 1964

Dr. King lists the steps towards equality that have taken place all over the nation and he addresses the passage of the Civil Rights Bill. Dr. King explains what still needs to be done in order to make America truly the land of the free.

MLK's Statement in Regards to Adlai Stevenson

Wednesday, July 14, 1965

Dr. King makes a statement following the death of Adlai Stevenson.

Higher Education Opportunities for Southern Negroes

Sunday, January 1, 1967

The Southern Education Foundation provides a detailed list of references concerning various opportunities, organizations and procedures related to higher education. This pamphlet was strategically designed to assist organizations and community leaders seeking to improve educational opportunities for students of color.

Gethsemane

Dr. King notes the Biblical story of Jesus' experience before his crucifixion. He uses the parable to speak to the human experience of pain and the faith one must have in God. Jesus went to Gethsemane to pray. He brought apostles John, James, and Peter and had them take watch while he prayed in the garden. When Jesus returned, his friends were sleeping. At this moment, Jesus realized their indifference to his agony. Though standing in pain and loneliness, Jesus used his faith in God to accept his situation as it was, with no efforts of escape.