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"South Carolina (SC)"

Northern District of Mississippi Court Order

Tuesday, November 8, 1966

District Court Judge Claude F. Clayton for Mississippi, issues an order sustaining part of the motion for supplemental relief on behalf of minor plaintiffs, Sharper T. Cunningham and Darlene Cunningham vs. Grenada Municipal Separate School District of Mississippi.

Notecard Containing the Definition of Evil

In this notecard Dr. King details the reason for suffering. He references notes from "City of God" by St. Augustine.

Religion

Dr. King writes about the role of religion as an ideal and as a unifying force.

The Martin Luther King Column (2)

Dr. King discusses the hardwork and efforts of Daisy Bates and her husband, Lucius, on behalf of the civil rights movement.

Birmingham Jail

Tuesday, December 7, 1965

Reverend Robert J. Leuver sends Dr. King an article titled "Birmingham Jail.". In the article, Harry Cargas learns that there are some members of the police force who support the Civil Rights Movement, but are too fearful to speak out against the racial atrocities. It was here that Mr. Cargas realized the ongoing struggle for outspoken and silent supporters of the movement for social change.

King to Visit Southside Virginia

Tuesday, March 12, 1968

This article describes Dr. King's visit to Virginia on the "people-to-people" tour as a part of the Poor People's Campaign.

Correspondence - Aftermath of Dr. King's Assassination, 4/5/68

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter, originating from Chattanooga, TN on the day immediately following Dr. King's assassination, is a personal note of condolence and lament. In it the writer identifies Dr. King as "truly America's outstanding citizen of our time". The writer and addressee are unidentified.

Stanford University Faculty and Staff Pledge of Civil Disobedience

Friday, May 26, 1967

The Faculty and Staff members of Stanford University make a pledge of civil disobedience to protest the Vietnam conflict. The individuals signing the pledge request members of the clergy and academic community with like sentiments to join them in this demonstration.

Letter from MLK to Ms. Susan Stauffer

Thursday, August 20, 1964

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation to Susan Stauffer for her contribution to the SCLC. He states, "such moral and financial support are of inestimable value for the continuance of our humble efforts."

Evil

Dr. King quotes the definition of evil and conceptualizes it as a "frustration."

Letter from Wyatt T. Walker to S. I. Hayakawa

Tuesday, July 30, 1963

Wyatt Tee Walker writes S. I. Hayakawa, academic and political figure of Japanese ancestry, informing him that the SCLC is not a tax-exempt organization. Walker says that because it is not tax exempt they are free to do as they please, and he directs Hayakawa on where to send future contributions.

Memo on Strategy of the Integration Movement

An anonymous writer pens a comprehensive strategy that focuses on achieving racial integration. Within the text of the document, the writer identifies various political, social and economical developments that are needed in order to end racially stemmed inequalities for African Americans.

Letter from Rev. Cyril S. Butterfield to MLK

Monday, September 27, 1965

Reverend Cyril Butterfield invites Dr. King to come speak in Bermuda at the Allen Temple A.M.E. Church.

Letter to Mrs. King from Patricia Pleas

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter of condolence originates from East Orange, NJ, and is addressed to Mrs. King. The letter was written the day, following Dr. King's assassination, and its receipt stamp date would suggest the vast volume of mail, in the aftermath of his death.

Telegram from Mrs. Ernest Bavely to MLK

Wednesday, October 19, 1960

Mrs. Bavely sends a supportive telegram to Dr. King during his confinement at the Fulton County Jail. She assures him "children of tomorrow, tomorrow, and tomorrow, will inherit those values for which you are striving."

The Citizenship Education Program

This newsletter serves as a platform for the Citizenship Education Program. The program is designed to help inform African Americans of their rights as citizens in the United States.

Letter from Dr. King to Rev. & Mrs. Sargent

Monday, November 8, 1965

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Rev. & Mrs. Sargent for their efforts in getting him to visit Paris and for their support of funding SCLC.

"Dr. King Denounces Write-In Plot"

Monday, November 2, 1964

Contrary to what radio announcements and newspapers advertise, Dr. King urges Negro voters to vote for a presidential candidate that is already on the ballot. He expresses that he is not a candidate and does not want voters to write his name on the ballot.

Urban Insurance Coverage

Congressman William S. Moorhead introduces legislation to the House of Representatives, seeking to improve urban insurance coverage and provide governmental riot reinsurance.

Facing the Challenge of a New Life

Dr. King uses Greek Philosophy, the Christian conception of agape love, and the need for nonviolent resistance as a guideline of "Facing the Challenge of a New Life" in America. Throughout the sermon, he encourages African Americans to remain committed to the nonviolent principles of the Montgomery Bus Boycott and the precepts of Christian living to facilitate the birth of a new way of life in an America dealing with violent conflicts over social conditions.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the Department of Justice to MLK

Monday, April 13, 1964

Civil Rights Division Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall informs Dr. King that the Department of Justice is investigating the assault upon Reverend Paul Chapman.

Letter from Glenn E. Smiley to MLK

Thursday, May 27, 1965

In this letter, Mr. Smiley requests an endorsement from Dr. King on the creation of a non-violent training film by The Fellowship of Reconciliation.

The Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom

This photograph encourages individuals to join the Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom to Washington, D.C in an attempt to arouse the conscience of the nation.

Letter from Douglas Straton to MLK

Wednesday, February 23, 1966

Douglas Straton, Chairman of the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Oregon, invites Dr. King to participate in their Distinguished Visiting Lectureship Program. The department would appreciate Dr. King's presentation of three lectures and attendance at a breakfast meeting with the town clergy. They offer him a $500 honorarium and request that he consider coming the following school year.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Marshall E. Bean

Thursday, July 8, 1965

Dora McDonald communicates to Marshall E. Bean that Dr. King is remembering him in his prayers and sends a photograph as a visual reminder. Miss McDonald also includes a scripture from the Book of Psalms.

Letter from A. Philip Randolph to MLK

Thursday, July 30, 1964

A. Philip Randolph asks Dr. King to make a tribute for Norman Thomas' eightieth birthday celebration.

Letter from William Kivi to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967

William Kivi references a statement made by Dr. King at the SCLC convention pertaining to everyone having a "guaranteed income." Kivi's belief is that Republican officials in the state of California continue to chisel away at federal programs designed to give the poor access to health care and other government aid. His recommendation to Dr. King as a solution would be a "restructured national civil service."

Letter from Rose Mary to MLK

Wednesday, February 7, 1968

Seventh grader Rose Mary writes to Dr. King commending his efforts concerning "racial problems" and informing him of her admiration.

Letter from Joseph Merchant to the Editor of the New York Times

Saturday, October 22, 1966

Mr. Merchant writes to the editor of the New York Times concerning Sargent Shriver's commitment to the poor of Mississippi. Mr. Merchant is concerned with the fact that Mr. Shriver did not refund the Child Development Group of Mississippi (CDGM).

The Martin Luther King Column: Life's Three Dimensions

In this self titled column, Dr. King writes about his theory of the three dimensions of the life: length, breadth and height. He refers to the "length of life" as an individual's desire to achieve personal goals. Next, he speaks of the "breadth of life," which is characterized by reaching out and helping others. Last but not least, Dr. King describes the "height of life" or a person's spiritual pursuit and connection with God. Dr. King asserts that in order to live a complete life, all three dimensions must be cultivated.