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Letter from Rosalind Rhines to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1968

Ms. Rhines, a student at Drake College of Business, requests Dr. King's opinion regarding the Civil Rights Bill proposed to Congress, and which candidate in the coming election has the best understanding of the American Negro struggle.

Letter from James P. Twomey to P. N. Brownstein

Monday, September 23, 1968

James Twomey writes P. N. Brownstein to express his pleasure in receiving Mr. Brownstein's letter informing him of the $4,000,000 the FHA-HUD has allocated for the housing rehabilitation program that Dr. King proposed.

Letter from Durand R. Kinloch to MLK

Friday, August 4, 1967

Supporter Durand Kinloch describes himself as "an average white graduate student" with two children who wants to continue to support Dr. King's fight for civil rights. He stresses that love and nonviolence are needed more than ever as he witnesses a resurgence of hate in 1967.

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Friday, March 20, 1964

Roy Wilkins invites Dr. King to attend an urgent meeting of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights to discuss civil rights developments in the Senate. The 1964 Civil Rights Act was under debate at the time in the United States House of Representatives and Senate.

Kierkegaard

Dr. King records Soren Kierkegaard’s definition of the existential moment.

Letter from Mary R. Hunt to Mrs.King Regarding Recommendation for Employment

Monday, May 27, 1963

Ms. Hunt, Director of the Extramural Department for Antioch College, sends Mrs. King the resume and photo of Dixie Lee Kisor for employment consideration.

Letter from Robert F. Kennedy to MLK

Thursday, March 31, 1966

Robert Kennedy writes to Dr. King to express his support for the Civil Rights Movement and the strive to preserve the basic values of freedom and dignity throughout the world. Lastly, Robert Kennedy sends Dr. King a series of speeches he made in January and wish to hear Dr. King's reactions to them.

Revelation

Dr. King discusses the idea that Jesus Christ is the only direct form of revelation, which was proposed in Emil Brunner's "The Mediator."

People to People: The Law is Majestic

Saturday, July 31, 1965

Dr. King pays homage to the numerous lawyers of the Civil Rights Movement and asserts that the one unifying belief among lawyers is the idea that "law is majestic and the judicial process is supreme." Dr. King supports this claim with a story about his Negro lawyers successfully winning a case in Birmingham with an all-white jury.

Memorandum from Lillie Hunter to MLK

Lillie Hunter sends Dr. King a memorandum that breaks down the office conditions and decorum as well as recommendations for the SCLC.

Keynote Address Introduction for Sidney Poitier

Monday, August 14, 1967

At the Tenth Annual Convention of the SCLC, Dr. King delivers this introduction of guest speaker, Sidney Poitier. Andrew Young further praises Mr. Poitier for informing the black community that one should be "proud to be black" because "black is beautiful."

National Clergymen's Conference on Operation Breadbasket

This schedule for the National Clergymen's Conference on Operation Breadbasket provides a description of the topics to be covered during the convention.

Letter from Henry Lee Gibson to MLK

Henry J. Gibson is aware of Dr. King's understanding of "God" and spirituality. Subsequent to a recent surgery, Mr. Gibson is now conscious of the meaning of being "born again." Praying enhanced his knowledge of God's presence in the human race which brought clarity for his perception of the "yellow man." Mr. Gibson requests to meet with Dr. King to further discuss his recent spiritual experiences and newly found wisdom.

New Wine in Old Bottles

Sunday, January 2, 1966

In a New Year's sermon at Ebenezer Baptist Church, Dr. King addresses Matthew 9:17. His explains that new ideas or inspiration cannot thrive in closed minds or old structures, such as the idea of equality in a segregated society. While Victor Hugo's "idea whose time has come" may be here, Dr. King says, we need to "help time" and overcome the initial resistance to new ideas with persistence and a transformation of the old structures.

Love

Dr. King quotes Ames' 1933 book entitled "Art" regarding the topic of love. "Love is the true life of man. God is love, and the kingdom of God is within us."

Check from the SCLC "Crusade for Citizenship" Program

Friday, December 31, 1965

Jimmy Wilson was issued this check from the Crusade for Citizenship organization.

OEO Moves to Aid Hungry Families in Seven States

Wednesday, May 3, 1967

The Office of Economic Opportunity initiates a new Food Stamp Loan program that will enable impoverished families to purchase "much needed" food.

The Chicago Freedom Movement: MLK Address

Friday, December 2, 1966

In this statement, Dr. King speaks on behalf of the Chicago Freedom Movement. Dr. King provides details concerning the overall mission, leadership and the predicated involvement of community organizations and participants.

Letter from Nathaniel Barber to MLK

Thursday, May 27, 1965

Nathaniel Barber addresses Dr. King and encloses a financial contribution to the SCLC in the amount of $5.00. Barber sends his prayers to the Reverend and asks for a suitable picture to hang on the wall of his office.

Speakers Bureau Contract for MLK

Tuesday, March 21, 1967

This contract outlines the details of a speaking engagement for Dr. King on May 12, 1967 at the University of Wisconsin, Marathon County Center.

Letter from W.J. Hurt to MLK

Sunday, August 13, 1967

W.J. Hurts thanks Dr. King for his tireless efforts to call for an end to the Vietnam war. He notes that although he doesn't agree with Dr. King on most things, he definitely can stand with him on his position regarding Vietnam.

MLK Announces End of Birmingham Campaign

Friday, May 10, 1963

The Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights released these remarks by Dr. King marking the end of the Birmingham Nonviolent Direct Action Campaign. King describes the day as a climax in the long struggle for justice and freedom in Birmingham and gives credit to Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth, to the thousands who went to jail, to the whites who worked for just solutions and to God. He speaks of the need for continued progress toward equal job opportunities, equal access to public facilities, and equal rights and responsibilities.

Letter from Ann and George Laringer to MLK

Friday, June 9, 1967

George Levinger's extends his gratitude to Dr. King for his stand against Vietnam. Levinger states, "One can preach nonviolence at home and ignore the violence abroad."

Southern Presbyterian Church Donation to SCLC

Friday, October 27, 1967

John Randolph Taylor informs Dr. King of a donation from "A Fellowship of Concern" and members of the Presbyterian Church U.S. to the SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Raphael Demos

Friday, July 19, 1963

Dr. King writes Harvard University professor Dr. Demos confirming his enrollment in the professor's Philosophy of Plato course. He also thanks Dr. Demos for his "kind words" regarding an article he wrote for "Christianity and Crisis." In addition, Dr. King further extends his regards to Mrs. Demos, whom Mrs. King studied with at the New England Conservatory of Music.

Statement by MLK Regarding His Five-Day Jail Sentence in Birmingham

Monday, October 30, 1967

Dr. King releases a statement regarding his return to Birmingham, Alabama to serve a five-day jail sentence. He states that he is happy to serve the sentence, but sad that the Supreme Court did not "uphold the rights of individual citizens." He also questions why the United States' resources are being used to fund the Vietnam War rather than to help the poor.

Letter to Dr. King from Ralph M. Otwell Requesting an Address to the 10th Anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education

Tuesday, March 24, 1964

Mr. Otwell, representing the Chicago Sun-Times, has requested that Dr. King writes an address to be published in the Sunday edition, regarding the 10th Anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education. Additionally, Mr. Otwell assures Dr. King that this will be an opportunity to promote his book, "Why We Can't Wait".

King Made Tactical Error In Choosing Slums as Issue

Thursday, March 3, 1966

This article addresses Mr. Jay McMullen's issue with Dr. King's "trusteeship" or "personal war" with Chicago slums serving as the focal point of his Chicago crusade. According to Mr. McMullen this approach showed not only the lack of diplomacy by Dr. King and his staff, but also proved that in fact their approach may be ten years too late.

Evil

Dr. King outlines Quintus Septimius Florens Tertullianus' insights on the question of evil.

"Dr. King Outdated"

Saturday, July 15, 1967

This editorial reviews Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" Under the heading "Dr. King Outdated." The review expresses Mr. Bob Smith's disagreement with many themes of the book.