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Our Struggle

Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), South Carolina (SC), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King drafts this speech entitled "Our Struggle" for the April 1956 publication of Liberation. Dr. King discusses how both whites and blacks have internalized a caste system that perpetuates Negroes as inferior beings. He speculates that racial peace is maintained in the caste system due to harsh discrimination and a loss of faith in the black community. Dr. King states that the shift in race relations, and subsequent tension, occurred when Negroes "began to re-evaluate themselves," finding self-respect and dignity.

Sin

Dr. King offers two possible interpretations of Psalms 53:1.

Letter from Henry Duerksen to MLK

Wednesday, April 28, 1965
Kansas (KS), Atlanta, GA, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

Duerksen sends a brief letter showing his support and pride for Dr. King's work and dismissing negative statements toward Dr. King.

Letter from William M. Kunstler to MLK Regarding a Guest Appearance

Friday, September 7, 1962
New York (NY), New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ), Massachusetts (MA), Connecticut (CT)

Here William M. Kunstler (Bill) makes two separate requests: first that Dr. King appear on the Barry Gray radio program for an interview, and, second, to receive a brief tape from the reverend for an NAACP housing rally at the Rye-Port Chester Chapter.

Letter from Harry H. Wachtel to General James M. Gavin

Friday, March 29, 1968
Cambridge, MA

Harry H. Wachtel, confidant and legal counsel to Dr. King, writes to General James M. Gavin, regarding a previously postponed meeting with Dr. King. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss the necessity of Dr. King's Poor People's Campaign.

Letter from James H. Scheuer to MLK

Tuesday, September 21, 1965
Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

James H. Scheuer, a representative of the United States Congress, informs Dr. King about the dismissal of the Mississippi challenge. Despite this action, Scheuer asserts that the attention received is a victory within itself. He concludes by stating "We must all work together to insure maximum enforcement of the Voting Rights Bill".

Letter from Evelyn Rawley to Billy Mills

Friday, March 3, 1967
California (CA), BAHAMAS, FRANCE

Evelyn E. Rawley writes Billy Mills, chairman of the Democratic County Central Committee, to express distaste for Mills' choice of colleagues, political activity, and lack of reason. Rawley affirms that Mill's irresponsible actions are an obstacle to democratic practices.

Letter from Joseph Clark to MLK

Tuesday, March 19, 1968
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Joseph S. Clark, Chairman of the Senate Subcommittee on Employment, Manpower and Poverty, writes Dr. King to request his testimony. Dr. King's speech would serve as a preface to the hearing on public service and private enterprise employment/training programs.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding Education Heritage

Friday, March 13, 1964
New York, NY

In this letter, Joan Daves informs Dr. King that the Educational Heritage Company has come to an arrangement about distributing "Stride Toward Freedom" and "Strength to Love." The letter goes on to say that Educational Heritage will pay a guarantee of $2500 against a royalty of 42 cent per copy sold.

Letter From PFC Harold Mac Kenzie To MLK

Saturday, March 30, 1968
San Francisco, CA, THAILAND, South Carolina (SC)

In this letter to Dr. King, serviceman Harold Mac Kenzie explains how he is interested in the welfare of Black people and would like to know how he can contribute to the movement.

Letter from MLK to Former Supporters

VIETNAM, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, CHINA, FRANCE, JAPAN

Dr. King addresses former supporters concerning his controversial stance on Vietnam. He examines the country's colonial history and struggle for independence as contributing factors to America's current military presence in Vietnam. The civil rights leader defends his commitment to nonviolence as an "exceptional moral responsibility" that must transcend international borders.

Letter from Thomas C. McGarth to MLK

Wednesday, September 22, 1965
Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Congressman Thomas C. McGarth writes to Dr. King concerning recent challenges surrounding the seating of the Mississippi Congressional Delegation. McGarth discusses his involvement with the voting process.

Freedom Rally

Thursday, April 16, 1964
Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL

This document is the program for the Freedom Rally held at Vermont Avenue Baptist in support of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Peter Manniche to MLK

Tuesday, December 31, 1963
DENMARK

Peter Manniche, Chairman of the Scandinavian Executive Committee invites Dr. King to the Scandinavian nations to make public, radio, and television speaking appearances. Mr. Manniche is hopeful the Dr. King's presence in Eastern Europe will garner support for the civil rights cause in America.

Letter from E. H. Singmaster to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967
Florida (FL)

E.H. Singmaster informs Dr. King that they should "hang together" and not separate in war and peace. He advocates that those involved in the military are "improved," regardless of color or gender.

Anti-Poverty Bill

Tuesday, August 9, 1966

This document outlines and provides the status of the Anti-Poverty legislation in Congress.

Envelope addressed to Coretta Scott King from the House of Representatives

Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

This envelope is addressed to Coretta Scott King and originates from Congress. Notable are the stamps denoting the date of the post mark and date of receipt, six and eleven days, respectively, after the day of Dr. King's assassination.

The Miami Herald: Who Threw the Bomb?

Wednesday, September 18, 1963
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

In this newspaper clipping, "Washington Post" columnist Charles Morgan Jr. argues that the responsibility for the Birmingham bombings lies with the entire community.

The Advances of Operation Breadbasket

Monday, December 5, 1966
Chicago, IL, Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA

This document displays two articles that report on the progress made by "Operation Breadbasket" in Chicago. The first article discusses SCLC's negotiations with High-Low Foods, a Chicago chain that agreed to implement business practices that would serve "Negro-owned" businesses in the community and increase black employment in the company. The second article highlights similar negotiations carried out with National Tea Co., another Chicago based business. Civil Rights leaders Jesse Jackson and Rev.

Messianic Hope

Dr. King writes on the concept of "Messianic Hope" as covered in the Old Testament book, Micah.

Letter from Rev. Thomas S. Maloney to MLK

Wednesday, April 27, 1966
ITALY, Louisville, KY

Thomas Maloney asks for assistance in preparing his dissertation on Dr. King's philosophy of nonviolence for the Gregorian University in Rome. He requests clarification on Dr. King's definition of violence, nonviolence, agape and justice, as well as how the four principles relate.

Letter from A. Susi to MLK

Monday, March 13, 1967
New York, NY

The Local 89 Chefs, Cooks, Pastry Cooks and Assistants Union of New York provided Dr. King with $100 to aid in his work for equality.

Letter from R. Lennox to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965
CANADA, New York, NY

R. Lennox writes a follow-up letter to Dr. King regarding an invitation to speak at the annual convocation celebrating the one hundredth anniversary of The Presbyterian College.

Letter to Monsier Sempe from Joan Daves

Thursday, October 17, 1963
New York (NY), FRANCE

This is a letter stating that Dr. King's "Letter from the Birmingham Jail" cannot be used in any books because Dr. King wants it to appear in his own book first and it cannot be used before a French version of that book becomes available. Any translation and duplication of his letter violates copyright laws.

Letter from House Speaker John W. McCormack to MLK

Monday, May 15, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Massachusetts (MA), Washington, D.C.

Massachusetts Democratic Congressman and Speaker of the House John W. McCormack thanks Dr. King for a recent telegram and agrees with the views Dr. King expressed.

Letter from Joseph Berke to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967
London, England, Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Joseph Berke replies to Dr. King's response to an invitation to attend the Dialectics of Liberation and shares his content with one of Dr. King's speeches on the war in Vietnam.

Letter Judith Van Swaringen to MLK

Tuesday, December 8, 1964
Washington, D.C., Maryland (MD)

Judith Van Swaringen, a senior at Surrattaville High School in Clinton, Maryland, writes to Dr. King requesting information for her report dealing with the Reverend's steps leading to the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Joseph Caputo to MLK

Thursday, June 1, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

Joseph Caputo, a graphic arts teacher from Russell Sage Jr. High School in Queens, New York, collaborated with his students on a booklet entitled, "Let My People Go." The booklet features various illustrations and verses; and focuses on themes prominent to Dr. King's life and work. The accompanying letter includes a dedication to Dr. King and Roy Wilkins.

Letter from Irving Davis to MLK

Tuesday, August 15, 1967
Missouri (MO), Atlanta, GA

Irvin Davis of Celebrities Art Exhibits invites Dr. King to tour with the organization depending on his artistic abilities.

MLK to Bill Moyers of Newsday

Friday, May 19, 1967
New York (NY)

Dr. King writes to Bill Moyers of NEWSDAY and apologizes for not responding to his letter in a timely manner.