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"South Africa"

Advertisement for Why We Can't Wait

This advertisement for Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait," appeared in the Christian Herald in June of 1964.

Open Letter Regarding Chicago Real Estate Practices

Monday, August 1, 1966
Washington, D.C., Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Lee Brooke, of Oak Park River Forest Housing Committee near Chicago, sends an open letter to members of Congress, the Governor of Illinois and the Chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission. In it, he discusses discriminatory real estate practices in the Chicago area, and presents evidence gathered by the housing committee to show why there is a need to regulate the real estate industry.

Letter from Ms. Bernice Gutman to The Public Review Advisory Commission

Thursday, March 30, 1967
Chicago, IL

This document is a letter to the Public Review Advisory Commission from a union concerning a scholarship and additional information for applicants.

I've Been To The Mountaintop

Wednesday, April 3, 1968
Memphis, TN, EGYPT, GREECE, Johannesburg, South Africa, KENYA, GHANA, New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Jackson, MS, Birmingham, AL, CHINA, Philadelphia, PA, Los Angeles, CA, GERMANY, Albany, GA, Tennessee (TN), New York (NY), Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, Pennsylvania (PA), California (CA), UNITED KINGDOM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CANADA, Los Angeles, CA, South Africa

Dr. King delivers the "I've Been to the Mountaintop" speech at the Masonic Temple in Memphis, TN.

The Martin Luther King Column - No. 3

GERMANY

In this column, Dr. King speaks of the outbreak of "Nazi-like degeneracy" less than 15 years after the Holocaust. He says that in spite of these evils, it should not discourage us from coming together as human beings, living in harmony and not letting the dangers of racism paralyze us as a world community.

Movement for Puerto Rican Independence

VIETNAM, PHILIPPINES, CUBA, PUERTO RICO, NICARAGUA, CONGO / ZAIRE, SOUTH KOREA

Pedro Juan Rua, a leader in the Movement for Puerto Rican Independence, gives a speech concerning the American military presence in Vietnam. He provides a historical framework for understanding America's involvement with other oppressed nations, asserting "U.S. rulers are new Nazis. Unite to defeat them."

Telegram from Robert F. Kennedy to Wyatt Tee Walker

Monday, September 24, 1962
Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy writes to Wyatt Tee Walker regarding the progress of the SCLC. Kennedy believes that the right to vote will eliminate "continued discrimination and injustice."

Draft: The Time for Freedom Has Come

Tuesday, May 1, 1962
GHANA, NIGERIA, KENYA, CONGO / ZAIRE, MALAWI

In this draft of Dr. King's article, "The Time for Freedom Has Come," he discusses the role of African American students in the Civil Rights Movement. He praises the commitment and determination of students and credits them with the desegregation of lunch counters. He also identifies with the students' frustration with the slowness of forward progress in the struggle for equality. The article was published in New York Times Magazine on September 10, 1961.

Teleological Argument

Dr. King quotes Immanuel Kant’s view of the teleological argument from “Critique of Pure Reason.”

Letter From Birmingham City Jail

Wednesday, May 1, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, GERMANY, Texas (TX), Mississippi (MS), Albany, GA, Montgomery, AL, Georgia (GA), New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA), HUNGARY

This version of Dr. King's "Letter From Birmingham Jail," published by the American Friends Service Committee, also includes the original statement made by the clergyman that prompted Dr. King's response. The eight clergymen described Dr. King's actions as "unwise and untimely." In his response, Dr. King references biblical and historical figures to illustrate why the Civil Rights Movement can no longer wait. He also expresses his frustration with many within organized religion and the moderate white American.

The Task of Christian Leadership Training for Education in the Local Community

Atlantic City, NJ, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New Jersey (NJ)

This undated manuscript was used as the basis for a speech Dr. King gave at the National Sunday School and Baptist Training Union Congress in Atlantic City, New Jersey in 1944. Dr. King defines community, lists three current problems within the community and explains the role of Christian leaders and education in a community. Dr. King identifies the most pressing problems as the economy, divisions within Christianity and race relations.

Letter from Richard W. Boone

Saturday, October 29, 1966
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS), New York, NY, Memphis, TN, Chicago, IL, Cambridge, MA, New Orleans, LA, Texas (TX), Jackson, MS

The Child Development Group of Mississippi is being terminated by the Office of Economic Opportunity. This is not because the program isn't valid but because it would disturb the balance of politics in Mississippi. Klein and Saks, Inc. has helped keep the program alive. The goal of the program was to provide education, medical assistance, and nourishment for preschool children and their families.

Letter from Massachusetts Mental Health Center to MLK

Tuesday, January 16, 1962
Boston, MA

Drs. Myron Sharaf and Milton Greenblatt invite Dr. King to speak at the Commonwealth of Massachusetts' Department of Mental Health where the staff and researchers share an interest in ending "hate in social life."

Letter to the Montgomery Advertiser

Friday, January 11, 1957
Montgomery, AL

The Southern Negro Leaders Conference expresses their appreciation to the Montgomery Advertiser.

Unity

These notes, prepared by Dr. King, were for a sermon entitled "Unity." This sermon, believed to be composed during the time of 1948-1954, was never delivered.

Deism

London, England, FRANCE

Dr. King defines "deism" as a concept developed by a group of English and French religious thinkers who "interpreted God purely in terms of natural order" during the 17th and 18th century.

Letter from Leonard L. Brooks to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968
Maine (ME), Atlanta, GA

The Portland campus of the University of Maine requests Dr. King to speak to the student body in support of Choice '68 National Collegiate Presidential Primary.

White Backlash Growing

Friday, August 26, 1966
Chicago, IL, Denver, CO, ITALY, AUSTRIA, Boston, MA, GERMANY, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, POLAND, GREECE, Los Angeles, CA, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA)

The intensity in the Civil Rights Movement increased as blacks remained segregated and the Black Power movement gained popularity. White backlash increased during these times, but Dr. King noted that demonstrations "did not breed hate, but only revealed hatred that already existed."

Letter from William M. Kunstler to MLK Regarding a Guest Appearance

Friday, September 7, 1962
New York (NY), New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ), Massachusetts (MA), Connecticut (CT)

Here William M. Kunstler (Bill) makes two separate requests: first that Dr. King appear on the Barry Gray radio program for an interview, and, second, to receive a brief tape from the reverend for an NAACP housing rally at the Rye-Port Chester Chapter.

Letter from Harvey Weeks to MLK

Sunday, May 14, 1967
California (CA), Chicago, IL, VIETNAM, Montgomery, AL

Harvey Weeks writes to Dr. King to show his support for Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War. He also offers some advice and makes an appeal.

Letter from Betty to Mrs. King

Monday, January 16, 1967
Montgomery, AL

Betty writes Mrs. King to check on their children and to wish them the best.

Letter from Marc Pilisuk to MLK

Thursday, June 22, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Indiana (IN), CANADA

Marc Pilisuk, Associate Professor of Administrative Science and Psychology at Purdue University, requests Dr. King's permission to reprint the book "The Triple Revolution."

Letter from Dr. Eliot Stadler to MLK

Friday, August 14, 1964
Maine (ME)

Dr. Stadler writes Dr. King regarding his inability to join him in his campaign for the "rights of man." He expresses his regret with an enclosure of a financial contribution.

Letter from Charles W. Lockyer to MLK

Tuesday, August 15, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Charles Lockyer sends Dr. King a special limited edition of the International Library of Negro Life and History as a gift. Lockyer explains that the book series is a collaboration between his publishing company and the Association for Study of Negro Life and History.

MLK Index Card

Dr. King outlines Montesquier and his combination of historical and economical science.

Telegram from Elmer J. Holland to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965
Washington, D.C.

Congressman Holland assures Dr. King that he will "oppose all crippling amendments" to the Voting Rights Bill of 1965.

God

Dr. King writes about God, according to the first chapter of the Old Testament book, Nahum.

Letter from Senator Robert F. Kennedy to MLK

Thursday, March 31, 1966
Washington, D.C., VIETNAM, ISRAEL, Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Chicago, IL, Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL

Senator Robert Kennedy thanks Dr. King for a previous correspondence and expresses his aligned views regarding nonviolent reconciliation. Senator Kennedy believes in the preservation of dignity and freedom internationally without imposing "incessant military conflict" upon those with unaligned views. He references Dr. King's statement regarding the precedence of progress in America to that of other countries. He also wishes to hear Dr. King's reaction to a series of his speeches on "A Program for the Urban Crisis" that he has attached.

Letter Withdrawing Support From Gordon Delsemer to Dr. King

Thursday, October 19, 1967
Baltimore, MD

This letter dated October 20, 1967, was sent to Dr. King from Gordon H. Delsemer. Mr. Delsemer is withdrawing his support from the SCLC because of the "anti-Semitic" statements he believes were made by certain black leaders.

Letter from Leonard Zion to MLK

Thursday, April 22, 1965
Massachusetts (MA)

Leonard Zion writes Dr. King stating that SCOPE (Summer Community Organization and Political Action) is organizing students and faculty at Brandeis University in Massachusetts to raise $40,000 to support him. The SCOPE project was run under the auspices of the Atlanta-based SCLC.