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A Look to the Future

Monday, September 2, 1957

Dr. King addresses the Highlander Folk School during the organization's twenty-fifth anniversary. He discusses the many accomplishments and hurdles of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from MLK to Rev. H. Edward Whitaker

Tuesday, April 3, 1962

Dr. King responds to a letter from Rev. Edward Whitaker, regarding Whitaker's desire to be a college minster. He expresses to Whitaker that his experience should serve him well for such a responsibility. Dr. King and Rev. Whitaker were classmates at Crozer Theological Seminary.

Letter from Reverend Durstan R. McDonald to MLK Regarding an Invitation

Friday, March 15, 1968

The Hobart and William Smith Colleges have brought influential leaders to their campus from the civil rights and black power movements. Many students desire a further understanding of the Gospel and have requested to invite Dr. King to speak. The dates provided for this engagement are unfortunately subsequent to the assignation of Dr. King.

Letter from Louise A. Andrews to MLK

Thursday, December 28, 1961

On behalf of the American Friends Service Committee, Louise Andrews invites Dr. King to attend and speak at one of their Regional offices in Pennsylvania or Wisconsin.

Letter from Nathan W. Turner to MLK

Wednesday, September 22, 1965

The American Baptist Board of Education and Publication sends a contribution to the SCLC to assist with voter registration.

Letter from Ann Gallagher to Dr. King, January 31, 1967

Tuesday, January 31, 1967

In this correspondence to Dr. King, Ann Gallagher of the Catholic School Div. of Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Inc, was requesting the copyrights for "Letter from a Birmingham Jail," which would be featured in Father Joseph Novak's, "Christianity Today: A Book of Reading."

Letter from Annie Emehel to Dr. King

Tuesday, March 12, 1968

In this letter, Mrs. Annie Emehel wishes Dr. King success, in his upcoming trip to Nigeria. Dr. King was going to Nigeria to try to help the government and Biafra find a solution to their disagreements. Mrs. Emehel states that she has confidence that Dr. King will be able to help both sides come to a resolution.

He Was a Moment in the Conscience of Man

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

This article discusses the importance of preserving Dr. King's teachings and legacy.

Memorandum from David M. Wallace to Dora McDonald

Saturday, February 11, 1967

David Wallace informs Dora McDonald of contributions made to the SCLC from John H. Johnson, George Jones, and Willard Payne, Sr.

Letter to Ruth D. Beyer from Dorothy Gaines

Thursday, July 8, 1965

Dorothy Gaines provides Ruth D. Beyer with the address of the Montgomery Improvement Association due to the possibility of a check lost in the mail.

March on Washington Record

Entitled "We Shall Overcome!" this document advertises the selling of the "authorized record" of the 1963 March on Washington. The record includes "inspiring songs of freedom" and speeches from the historical march.

Speech to SCLC Convention about Vietnam

Thursday, August 12, 1965

Dr. King makes one of his first public statements opposing the war in Vietnam during the SCLC Convention held in Birmingham. According to King, "Neither the American people nor the people of North Vietnam is the enemy. The true enemy is war itself, and people on both sides are trapped in its inexorable destruction."

Letter from Marilyn Sauer to MLK

Wednesday, May 31, 1967

Marilyn Sauer, Administrative Assistant to Dr. L. M. McCoy, provides Dr. King with the address of the Archbishop of Recife. Sauer also informs Dr. King of the proper way to address the Archbishop.

Philosophy

Dr. King describes philosophy as being the "wholes of which sciences describe the parts." He states that the answers to questions will differ depending on the school of philosophy one references.

Letter from Genevieve Young to Joan Daves

Wednesday, January 4, 1967

Genevieve Young expresses her opinion about the outline for Dr. King's upcoming book "Where Do We Go From Here?" She offers some suggestions and strategies to Joan Daves to help narrow the scope of the manuscript.

Letter from Dorothy Hunt to MLK Regarding "The Critic"

Monday, March 2, 1964

Dorothy Hunt of The Thomas More Association begins this letter by thanking Dr. King for his prompt reply to their request about contributing to "The Critic." She then asks Dr. King if he would be able to do a piece for "The Critic," and if they could purchase the first American newspaper and magazine rights to a chapter from his book. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in red ink.

Letter from Thomas Johnson to MLK

Thomas Johnson, managing editor for 'The Forum' at Fisk University, explains that a new chapter of SNCC has recently been charted at the school. Johnson also requests that Dr. King write an editorial for their next publication.

Letter from Bayard Rustin to MLK

Monday, May 15, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Rustin requests that Dr. King assents to being a member of the "Institute's Board of Advisory Directors".

Letter from MLK to Helen Anderson

Friday, February 9, 1968

This letter is in acknowledgement and appreciation of contributions to the SCLC from Mrs. Helen Anderson to Dr. King which was overlooked in the mail.

Letter from MLK to Aileen B. Armstrong

Wednesday, October 16, 1963

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Armstrong for her letter and contribution. He explains the difference her donation will make in the SCLC's efforts to integrate "the Negro into all aspects of American life."

Letter From Dora McDonald to Rev. Albert F. Campbell

Tuesday, May 2, 1967

Secretary McDonald writes Rev. Campbell on Dr. King's behalf, informing him of that Dr. King will consider his invitation to the next Men's and Women's Day celebration.

Unfair to Put Blame on Mississippi Poor

This editorial in the Tupelo (MS) Daily Journal claims it is unfair to attribute the proposed Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C. to poor Mississippians, who are uneducated and have no knowledge of Congress or how to mount a massive protest. The piece takes both Dr. King and Stokely Carmichael to task for suggesting that the wheels of government be ground to a stop until their demands are met.

"The Drum Major Instinct" Ebenezer Baptist Church

Sunday, February 4, 1968

The Drum Major Instinct, a sermon delivered by Dr. King at the Atlanta Ebenezer Baptist Church, frames the “instinct” as being responsible for the social ills of the world. Dr. King proclaims that racial inequality in America and the war in Vietnam are the result of nations engaging in a “bitter colossal contest for supremacy.” He suggests that the only way to end this “suicidal thrust” is to abide by an altered definition of the instinct – the definition of Jesus Christ.

Time

Dr. King highlights a quote regarding time. [This quote is attributed to Henry Austin Dobson.]

1966 Notes on the War

Dr. King annotates a speech to address his concerns about the war in Vietnam and his duties as a civil rights leader.

Dr. King's Strategy

In this article L. Harold DeWolf, dean of the Wesley Theological Seminary, describes the strategy of Dr. King. He asserts that Dr. King follows "the way of the cross" and confronts racial hatred with "daring love."

abstract needed

Friday, March 8, 1968

Pamphlet from the Child Development Group of Mississippi

This pamphlet is entitled "Histories Of: Children, Employees, Centers, Community Support." The organization, sponsored by the Child Development Center of Mississippi, is a statewide Head Start program that was organized in the summer of 1965.

MLK Itinerary

Wednesday, July 29, 1964

Dr. King's secretary is writing Joan Daves to notify her of his speaking engagements for the 1964-1965 season.

MLK Requests Contributions

Monday, April 1, 1968

Dr. King writes this fundraising letter on behalf of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He explains the campaigns taking place in Washington for the poor and urges immediate financial support for the struggle.