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"South Africa"

Letter from Beatrice Rossell to MLK

Saturday, July 4, 1964

Beatrice Rossell wrote this letter to Dr. King on Independence Day in 1964, commending him on the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and enclosing a donation. She ends her note, saying "God bless you, your fine family, and the future of your great work."

Letter from Genevieve Fay to MLK

Tuesday, April 18, 1967

This letter from Mrs. Fay gives her appreciation to Dr. King for his efforts. She expresses her deep concern for the motives of the political figures in Washington, D.C., and the importance of Dr. King's presence to counter the imbalance.

MLK Remarks at The World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

Thursday, May 28, 1964

Dr. King addresses the 25th anniversary of the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund. Dr. King delivers remarks honoring the work of the Fund in combating the system of racial segregation and striving for human rights. He advocates the need for current civil rights legislation, but finds congressional hesitation frustrating and problematic. Referencing the 1964 Civil Right's Act, King is convinced that if the bill is not passed, the "nation will drift toward its moral and political doom."

Letter from Edward Boland to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965

Representative Edward P. Boland informs Dr. King of his signing of the Discharge Petition for Home Rule in the District of Columbia.

Letter from Dr. Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Thursday, January 4, 1962

In this letter to Dr. King, Benjamin E. Mays, president of Morehouse College informs Dr. King about the meeting with Robert Troutman on matters that involve input from President Kennedy.

Letter from Francis Drake to MLK

Friday, November 29, 1963

Francis Drake sends Dr. King a donation to the SCLC collected on behalf of the Drake Family as a Thanksgiving gift. Drake and his wife are ministers with the United Church of Christ in Massachusetts and support Dr. King's fight for freedom and justice.

Telegram from Margaret Saunders to MLK

Friday, October 21, 1960

Margaret Saunders sends a telegram to encourage Dr. King while he is in jail.

Letter from P. A. Riley to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

A critic writes Dr. King a carefully constructed letter to share her view on his Vietnam War stance. As a widow of a late Korean War veteran, she claims that Dr. King's position undermines "everything that our fighting men, down thru the long, long, years, have fought and died for." The widow questions Dr. King's combination of civil rights and peace movement issues, and asserts "patriotism is one of the factors free men live and prosper under!"

Letter from Harold Eggers to MLK

Thursday, December 29, 1966

In this letter Harold Eggers, a White supremacist, criticizes the African American race, for what Eggers perceives as an inability to recognize "real leadership ability." However, he does this while commending Dr. King for possessing "real leadership ability."

Letter from Mrs. George W. Hammond to Ralph David Abernathy

Sunday, April 28, 1968

Mrs. Hammond writes Reverend Abernathy with the hope of finding someone to purchase her home in Bristol, New Hampshire.

Letter from Doris Everett to MLK

Ms. Everett expresses appreciation to Dr. King for leading a successful boycott in Montgomery, Alabama and for his contributions to help Negros obtain equality.

Letter from Leroy Benefield to MLK

Tuesday, January 23, 1968

Mr. Benefield requests information on how Dr. King prepared his Old Testatment sermons.

Telegram from MLK to Frank Brown

Thursday, January 6, 1966

Dr. King sends his condolences to Frank Brown following the death of Mr. Brown's wife, Margaret.

The Black Rose: Ruth Reese

Thursday, December 10, 1964

Ruth Reese, also known as "The Black Rose," thanks Dr. King for his support. This document includes a detailed biography of the vocalist, as well as, critic responses on her performances.

Housing Report to the SCLC Board of Directors

Members of the SCLC Board of Directors were the recipients of this detailed report outlining solutions to end the slum crisis in the North.

Review on "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community" 1967

Saturday, April 15, 1967

The Virginia Kirkus Review wrote this descriptive review on Dr. King's final book, Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community? The context of the review shows differences between the messages of Dr. King's earlier works and Where Do We Go From Here. Dr. King's earlier publications focused on the work of gaining decent treatment and basic civil rights for black Americans. However, this book heavily challenged the status quo in America.

Letter from MLK to Laura R. Daly

Tuesday, April 19, 1966

Dr. King apologizes to Laura Daly for his delayed response and expresses his appreciation for her financial contribution. He states that the "new democracy" that has emerged in the south would not be possible without the moral and financial support from contributors such as Miss Daly. He discusses how there is still work to accomplish and the SCLC will continue their efforts in the freedom struggle.

Letter from John T. Walker to MLK

Wednesday, February 21, 1968

On behalf of the Washington Cathedral. John Walker extends an invitation for Dr. King to preach at the Cathedral and articulate the true premise of the Poor People's Campaign to their congregation. Walker believes that Dr. King's physical presence will help eliminate doubts that this civil disobedience campaign will turn to violence. Dr. King is would eventually preach the final sermon of his life on March 31 at the Washington Cathedral under the subject "Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution."

Women Strike for Peace: How Can You Be Silent?

Thursday, April 1, 1965

This newsletter exemplifies the struggle that Vietnamese children faced during the war. It also urges many to protest in order to prevent young children from dying.

Letter from Samuel G. Jackson

Mr. Jackson requests assistance with the Minority Youth in a Higher Education project. This particular project is aimed at increasing the number of black and Puerto Rican students at predominantly white institutions.

Dr. MLK and the American Dream

The article talks about Dr.King addressing the issue of racial imbalance in Boston public schools. Dr. King expresses his opinion that "racial segregation is politically unsound and relegates persons to the status of things, stigmatizing persons of color as untouchables in a caste system.

Telegram From Mrs. Mary Kru to MLK

Saturday, March 12, 1966

In this telegram, Mrs. Mary Kru writes to Dr. King, "your plans of operation put me out of work".

Letter from Rev. Harvey H. Batos, Jr. to MLK

Thursday, April 13, 1967

Rev. Batos Jr. expresses his support of Dr. King's political involvement despite the critisim by the New York Times.

Index Card Containing MLK's Handwriting Regarding Metaphysics

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Bishop McConnell's views on Metaphysics, according to the book, "Is God Limited."

Letter from MLK to S. P. Belcher

Tuesday, April 5, 1966

Dr. King express gratitude for the receipt of financial support during an event at the Palasis des Sports. In addition, Dr. King highlights the importance of the demonstration for international concerns of the French and American communities in Paris.

Athanasius, St.

Dr. King records a short biography of the theologian St. Athanasius, identifying him as the defender of the Nicene faith.

God (His Infinity)

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich's "Systematic Theology" on the finite and infinite.

Judaism

Dr. King outlines some principles regarding Judaism according to Pope Pius XII.

Esther

Dr. King discusses the religious and moral teachings in the biblical book of Esther.

Suffering

Dr. King quotes and comments on Shakespeare's "Henry V."