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"South Africa"

The Mark of the Hawk

"The Mark of the Hawk" was a 1957 drama film distributed by Universal-International. The film features notable actors, Sidney Poitier and Eartha Kitt. Dr. King states that this movie is one of the "most captivating and moving productions."

Letter from Fred Gardner to MLK

Tuesday, August 9, 1966

Mr. Gardner believes that Dr. King is responsible for the acts of violence displayed by the Negros in Chicago. He states that as a man of the cloth, Dr. King should be more concerned with convincing Negros to "go back to where they came from."

Letter from Student Suzi Breece to MLK

Cuba, Missouri High School freshman Suzi Breece asks Dr. King to send a letter about why civil rights are important to everyone. She hopes to use his statement as part of a class project.

Letter from MLK to C.W. Greene

Thursday, August 10, 1967

In this letter to C.W. Greene of the Atlanta Life Insurance Company, Dr. King requests supplies for an upcoming convention.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Sandra Durlauf

Thursday, October 29, 1964

Dora McDonald encloses Dr. King's biographical information to help aid Sandra Durlauf in her studies. She also refers Mrs. Durlauf to read Dr. King's books "Stride Toward Freedom," "Crusader Without Violence," and "Strength to Love."

Letter from Frank R. Romano to MLK

Monday, May 1, 1967

Frank R. Romano expresses his support for Dr. Martin Luther King Jr by explaining his run as a peace candidate in the 1966 primary.

Letter from Eric Malling to MLK

Tuesday, December 21, 1965

Life (Poem)

Dr. King writes down part of playwright and composer Sir Noël Coward’s song “Twentieth Century Blues.”

Order Form: These Are Our Children

This order form depicts a photograph of children of varying races at the 1960 White House Conference on Children and Youth.

MLK's GRE Scores

Thursday, February 1, 1951

This report contains MLK's graduate record examination scores.

The Freedom Movement and the War in Vietnam

Saturday, April 1, 1967

In this reprint of an article originally printed in the fall of 1965, Professor Robert S. Browne makes a charge to the Department of Defense that the Negro troops were being used in Vietnam in disproportionate numbers. Freedomsways publications re-released the publication due to its remarkably fresh and informative content and high demand.

Notice from Leadership Conference on Civil Rights

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

Here is a letter to stimulate local civil rights organizations to undertake visits to House and Senate members during Easter Recess. The visits were to push for legislative goals such as "at least a million jobs for the hardcore unemployed, decent low cost housing for all and repeal of punitive welfare restrictions." The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights issued this notice, in the days following Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Constance Webb to MLK and Joan Daves

Thursday, March 2, 1967

In this letter, Constance Webb asks Dr. King to share more details about the comments Richard Wright made about "perhaps there was more behind the incident then simply a "mad" woman.", referring to the lady who stabbed Dr. King.

Letter from Marc Steel to Rev. R.D. Abernathy about a Term Paper

Saturday, April 27, 1968

Marc Steel, a high school sophomore from Maryland, wrote to Rev. Ralph Abernathy, requesting information on his role in the Civil Rights Movement. This student sought to acquire a narrative of Rev. Abernathy and his goals for SCLC, in order to complete a term paper.

MKL At Zoin Hill - "The Ballot"

Tuesday, July 17, 1962

This transcript of a passionate, poetic, and inspiring speech touches on many of King's motifs. It starts with an appeal for voting rights, addresses the despair the audience feels from time to time, and ends with a refrain of "we shall overcome."

Bayard Rustin Statement on Schwerner, Goodman and Chaney

Tuesday, August 4, 1964

Baynard Rustin notes the recent violence against three Negro male volunteers in the voter registration drive. Mr. Rustin describes the death of these men as acts that violate the "constitutional rights" of the Negro people. In the hopes of Mr. Rustin, this occurence will initiate a new force of the nonviolent movement.

Telegram from Unius Griffin to MLK

Unius Griffin writes to Dr. King regarding four Negro political candidates seeking elective offices in Wilcox County, Alabama. Griffin includes information on the increasing numbers of registered Negro voters and speaks to the various intents of each Negro candidate.

Traditionalism

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman’s “Introduction to Philosophy.”

New Politics Convention. Chicago, 1967

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

Letter of Condolence to Mrs. King from Deborah Easton

Friday, April 5, 1968

This handwritten letter of condolence was composed the day after Dr. King's assassination by a young student, Deborah Easton.

Letter from Bernhard M. Auer to MLK

Monday, December 18, 1961

Bernhard Auer, publisher for Time magazine, writes Dr. King to express his gratitude for Dr. King's role in helping attain accurate information throughout the year of 1961.

Telegram from MLK to Eartha Kitt

Thursday, May 16, 1963

Dr. King thanks singer-actress Eartha Kitt for her generous support and deep concern for the people of Birmingham, Alabama, and elsewhere in the South. He extends his appreciation to those in the Harlem Apollo Theatre who have contributed in response to her example.

Letter from James Dombrowski to MLK

Saturday, November 13, 1965

A letter to Dr. and Mrs. King, from Mr. James Dombrowski, thanks them for their support and contribution to SCEF.

Letter from the National Union of South African Students to MLK

Friday, April 2, 1965

On behalf of the National Union of South African Students at the University of Cape Town and the University Van Kaapstad, Martin West requests Dr. King's contribution concerning race relations to the Nusas Journal. The scholarly journal is the "only real national" organ available to students regardless of "race, religion, or colour" in apartheid South Africa.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rose R. Silvers

Tuesday, January 26, 1965

Dora McDonald informs Rose Silvers that Dr. King was concerned about an unknown speaking arrangement that he was scheduled to fulfill. Due to a congested schedule, Dr. King will notify Silvers about his availability to speak in the near future.

Postcard from Frank J. Meinen to the SCLC

Sunday, April 8, 1962

Upon recently hearing Dr. King speak, Frank J. Meinen writes the SCLC to ask how he can help.

Letter from Moisa Bulboaca to MLK

Tuesday, December 14, 1965

Moisa Bulboaca thanks Dr. King for a previous correspondence in which Dr. King expressed his interest in visiting and preaching in Romania. In the event Dr. King actually formulates a trip, Bulboaca suggests accompanying if possible. The author explains their background in "sacred music" and provides a brief biography for consideration. They offer to organize a musical selection to fit Dr. King's sermons.

Letter from James E. Orange to MLK

Rev. Andrew Young advises Rev. James Orange to contact Dr. King about a salary increase. As a member of the SCLC, Rev. Orange is assigned a project in Philadelphia and desires to avoid financial issues.

Letter from Clara Horner to MLK

Saturday, March 23, 1968

Clara Horner criticizes the methods of the Civil Rights Movement. She believes that instead of marching, Dr. King should work in higher education.

Speech in Jackson, Mississippi

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Dr. King addresses supporters in Jackson, Mississippi during his statewide tour for the 1968 Poor People's Campaign. He speaks of his excitement about the number of blacks in Mississippi that participated in the last congressional election. He emphasizes that the Poor People's Campaign cannot be successful without a strong coalition of organizations that see the need to combat poverty. King would be assassinated in Memphis two weeks after making this speech.