Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Selma, AL"

Letter from MLK to Adam Clayton Powell

Tuesday, January 2, 1968

Dr. King writes Adam Clayton Powell to seek advice on how to handle Powell's return from self-imposed exile in Bimini. Powell sought to publicize the event with a public announcement by Dr. King. However, Dr. King and Powell's lawyers suggest that they arrange a quiet, staged arrest with local officials to prevent public pressure from forcing a more lengthy arrest over the criminal contempt charges Powell faced for vacating his seat in Congress. Dr. King suggests more publicity could follow once Powell's lawyers free him on bond and begin the appeals process.

Letter from Edward Boland to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965

Representative Edward P. Boland informs Dr. King of his signing of the Discharge Petition for Home Rule in the District of Columbia.

Letter from Raphael Gould to Coretta Scott King

Mr. Gould of the Fellowship of Reconciliation sends Mrs. King a compilation of writings about and by Phan Thi Mai, a Vietnamese student who self-immolated on May 16, 1967 in an appeal to end the war in Vietnam. Mai "decided to burn herself to make her voice heard by the war."

Letter from Doug Dodge to MLK

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

Mr. Doug Dodge writes Dr. King to request his help in identifying an appropriate role in the Civil Rights Movement for a young white male who is seeking to get involved.

Malcolm X Statement by MLK

Monday, March 16, 1964

Dr. King responds to Malcolm X's break with Elijah Muhammad of the Nation of Islam by calling Malcolm’s program of “reciprocal bleeding” regrettable. This is more an indictment of a society whose racial ills produce a Malcolm X than of the man himself. The national community is now challenged to support full citizenship for Negroes while they still accept nonviolent leadership.

Letter to the Public of Montgomery, Alabama

The ministerial leaders of Montgomery address the problems of discrimination and segregation within the city's bus system. The ministers form a plan of action to eliminate such practices and attain a equal society for all.

Beyond the Los Angeles Riots

Saturday, November 13, 1965

Dr. King discusses the legacy of the Los Angeles riots in nonviolent protest. A decade after the Montgomery Civil Rights demonstrations, Dr. King speaks to the improvement of Southern African Americans' lives and the degradation of Northern African Americans' situations.

Letter from New York Third Grader Debbie Bass to MLK

Tuesday, April 6, 1965

Third grade student Debbie Bass chose Dr. King for her writing assignment. Bass feels that Dr. King was the right individual chosen to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. She also conveys her frustration towards Alabama Governor George Wallace for not allowing Negroes to vote.

Statement from the Eisenhower Administration to the NAACP

Sunday, June 26, 1955

In an address to the NAACP, Vice President Richard Nixon discusses the reasons that progress has been made in the Eisenhower Administration and the goals that the organization needs to continue working toward.

Letter to Hubert M. Humphrey from MLK

Friday, January 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Hubert M. Humphrey to praise his "matchless, exhaustive and courageous leadership" in guiding the Civil Rights Act of 1964. For his effort, Dr. King tells Congressman Humphrey that he has earned the "sincere gratitude" of the international community.

MLK Fights For Peace

Saturday, April 1, 1967

Included on page four of this Bedding, Curtain and Drapery Workers Union newsletter is an article regarding Dr. King's courageous efforts in helping Negros achieve equality, and the support he has received from the trade union. The union also supports Dr. King's stand against the Vietnam war, and agrees that the war is harming America's domestic programs against poverty.

War (Just War)

Dr. King cites Francisco Suarez's definition of a "just war" from his "Tractibus de. Legibus."

Anonymous Letter to MLK

This note, signed "A white citizen who likes good Negroes," warns that President Johnson is no friend to the Civil Rights Movement, only supporting African American voting rights to earn more votes for his reelection. It is unclear if both sides of this note were written by the same author. Both discuss how they are conscientious objectors, although they object to an integrated society, writing that "[No] high-class, intelligent persons (politicians excepted) will accept the Negro when he has an axe to grind."

Letter from Stanley Newman to MLK Regarding National Coalition for a New Congress

Newman writes that, given the recent passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Bill, a national coalition needs to be created to support and enforce it. Understanding the limitations of Congress, the new coalition would focus on transforming Congress to better support the needs of the underprivileged and oppressed.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald about Dr. King's "Three Lives for Mississippi" Preface

Friday, May 7, 1965

In this letter to Dora McDonald, Dr. King's assistant, Joan Daves writes that she has received Dr. King's preface for the foreign editions of "Three Lives For Mississippi."

The State of SANE

Tuesday, November 28, 1967

H. Stuart Hughes, Chairman of the National Committee for a SANE Nuclear Policy, writes this report to the board, sponsors and chapters of the organization. Hughes notifies his readers that SANE's policy making body is being renewed due to newly elected regional and national members. Also, the Board adopted a detailed statement of a strategy, which places top priority on promoting an alternative to President Johnson and his Vietnam War policy. Other events include the update of a successful Labor Leadership Assembly for Peace and guest speaker Norman Thomas.

MLK's Reply to Invitation to Speak at Centennial United Church

Tuesday, February 16, 1965

Dr. King regrets to inform Reverend William Morris that due to his busy schedule and previous inability to work directly with the civil rights struggle, he can not accept the invitation to speak at Centennial United Church.

Letter from MLK to Lester Kendel Jackson

Wednesday, July 17, 1963

Dr. King sends a check to Dr. Jackson at St. Paul Baptist Church in Gary, Indiana, to aid with reconstruction of the church.

Letter from Stanley M. Voice to MLK

Saturday, February 25, 1967

Stanley M. Voice writes to inform MLK why he is withdrawing support for SCLC in 1967. He thinks Negro leaders need a unified sense of direction.

The New York Times: Books of The Times Storm Warnings

Wednesday, July 12, 1967

Eliot Fremont-Smith examines Dr. King's stance on the term of Black Power, his views on political power for Negroes and his focus on nonviolence.

Letter from James C. Gray, M.D. to MLK

Thursday, November 7, 1963

Dr. James Gray of Washington, D.C. encloses three checks to Dr. King for the SCLC on behalf of his reading club. He encourages Dr. King to continue in his "great works."

Letter from MLK to a Donor

Dr. King expresses gratitude for a contribution received by The Montgomery Improvement Association.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Alfred A. Haesler Regarding "Where Do We Go From Here"

Thursday, October 5, 1967

In this correspondence to Alfred A. Haesler, Dora McDonald, Dr. King's secretary, acknowledged the receipt of Mr. Haesler letter, inviting Dr. King to complete a writing assignment. However, due to prior engagements, Dr. King would not be able to complete any other publications, but offered that his book entitled, "Where Do We From Here: Chaos or Community?" answered most of the questions raised in the letter.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Solomon Mendelson

Monday, January 8, 1968

In this letter, Dora McDonald is responding to Solomon Mendelson. McDonald expresses her excitement that Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech will be televised.

Letter from Peggy Duff to MLK

Thursday, September 21, 1967

Peggy Duff, from the International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace, writes to Dr. King requesting his support in ending the Vietnam War.

Letter from William H. Gray, Jr. to Congressman James A. Byrne

Monday, June 5, 1967

Prominent offical and businessman William H. Gray, Jr. writes United States Congressman James Byrne in regards to discrimination issues related to Negro students and the Selective Service System. Gray communicates with Congressman Byrne to intervene in a discriminatory matter involving a young Philadelphia native. Dr. King is forwarded a copy of this correspondence.

Letter From Henry Springs Jr. to MLK

Friday, September 2, 1966

Mr. Henry Springs requests Dr.King's help in creating "Action Programs," that would be beneficial to the African-American community in Lake County, Illinois.

Handwritten Notecard about Peace

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines J Maritain's views on Peace, from the book Christianity and Democracy.

Letter from Floyd Henderson to MLK

Saturday, February 3, 1968

Floyd B. Henderson informs Dr. King that he supports African Americans as a whole. He proceeds to ask him to help elect Richard Nixon for President.

Judaism

Dr. King quotes a statement from Joseph Klausner's book "From Jesus to Paul" regarding Judaism. Joseph Klausner was a Jewish historian.