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"Selma, AL"

Battle of Economic Opportunity

Friday, November 17, 1967

In this New York Post article, the author provides a perspective of the events leading to the Economic Opportunity Act as it pertains to both opposing sides; Democratic and Republican.

Letter from Margo George to MLK

Friday, April 23, 1965

Margo George, a student at the Kent School, wrote to Dr. King requesting any suggestions on how she could help with the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from MLK to Peter Servetnyk

Thursday, July 14, 1966

Dr. King declines an invitation from Peter Servetnyk to speak in Toronto.

Restorationism

Dr. King defines restorationism.

Today's Hero - The Negro Child

The "Southern Patriot" newsletter of the Southern Conference Educational Fund published this advertisement featuring the photo of two small children. The advertisement includes a heartfelt thank you to those many Negro students (trailblazers) brave enough to endure racial harassment and physical danger in the struggle to integrate schools in the South.

Letter of Support from Vivian Gourevitch to MLK

Wednesday, July 27, 1966

Supporter Vivian Gourevitch writes Dr. King to stress her belief that "Black Power" is a dangerous slogan.

Letter from Gulf Oil Corporation to MLK

Thursday, July 20, 1967

Craig Thompson, Director of Public Relations, informs Dr. King of Gulf Oil's discontent regarding the confusion of objectives surrounding his role as a world peacemaker. He informs Dr. King that their continued support will be provided to other respected Negro organizations "devoting their energies to the fundamental issues of the Negro's place in America."

Letter from Daniel Gallagher to MLK

Wednesday, May 23, 1962

Daniel Gallagher, manager of Textile Workers Union of America, encloses a check in the amount of $10.00 as a contribution to the SCLC.

Affidavit of Captain George Wall

Wednesday, April 10, 1963

George Wall, Captain of the Police Department for the City of Birmingham, submits an affidavit. The document states that a group of thirty-two Negroes led by Charles Billups and Fred Shuttlesworth were arrested for marching without a permit.

Telegram from United States House of Representatives to MLK

Thursday, March 25, 1965

The United States House of Representatives congratulates Dr. King and other leaders on their march to Montgomery, Alabama. They believe that the march will be recognized as the "beginning of genuine democracy" in American history.

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Thursday, January 5, 1967

Roy Wilkins, the chairman of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, urges Dr. King to attend a special meeting in Washington, D.C. to plan a course of action on pending civil rights legislation.

The Sickness of our Society

Dr. King describes three points that he claims as symptoms of the "Sickness of Our Society." These points include a suicide rate of one every twenty-seven minutes, more than half a million Americans in mental hospitals and three-quarters of a million with alcohol problems.

Peter Denied His Lord, And Cryed

Sam Bradley, from Friends Journal, composes a poem illustrating Saint Peter's denial of Jesus.

Note from Joan Daves to MLK

Wednesday, September 4, 1963

A representative of Joan Daves is enclosing a check for $120 for the Spanish edition of the book "Stride Toward Freedom."

Letter from Monica Wilson to MLK

Friday, February 18, 1966

Monica Wilson reaches out to Dr. King on behalf of a student organization at the University of Cape Town to obtain a response to their invitation asking Dr. King to deliver the T. B. Davie Memorial Lecture.

Statement from American Jewish Congress Regarding the Bundy School-Decentralization Plan

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

Murray A. Gordon, a New York lawyer and national vice president of the American Jewish Congress, endorses the Bundy School-Decentralization plan. Mr. Gordon believes that the reform is essential to good education and assures teachers that the plan will not violate their rights.

Letter from Miss McDonald to Mr. Virginia M. Burke

Tuesday, May 10, 1966

Miss McDonald writes to Mr. Burke of the University of Wisconsin granting permission to quote Dr. King's historical "I Have a Dream" speech.

Pamphlet About the Black Panther Party

Wednesday, June 1, 1966

This pamphlet contains historical and contextual references to the Black Panther Party. It also includes a speech by John Hulett and an interview of Stokely Carmichael highlighting the political and social movements occurring in Lowndes County, Alabama.

A Memo from the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE)

Thursday, April 6, 1967

This memorandum written by Lincoln Lynch, Associate Director of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), outlines proposed travel arrangements, speakers, workshop topics and entertainment for the upcoming National Convention.

SCLC Board Members

This document lists the SCLC's executive board of 53 members.

Letter from MLK to Vera Jones

Thursday, December 2, 1965

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Vera Jones for her support of the Freedom Movement and the SCLC.

Vote of Confidence for Negro Leader

Wednesday, January 24, 1968

In this editorial, a study of 300 negro in 13 cities, was conducted to determine the public attitude towards Dr. King.

It's Hard to Be a Christian

Dr. King outlines his sermon entitled "It's Hard to Be a Christian." King asserts that in order for one to be a fully committed Christian he or she must subordinate their ego and prioritize their concern for God's kingdom.

Letter from John H. Telfer to MLK

Saturday, March 13, 1965

Mr. Telfer, a 6th grade teacher, offers his sincerest gratitude for Dr. King and his efforts to eradicate injustice. He includes an additional thanks to Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth, a fellow civil rights leader.

Telegram from MLK to Amsterdam News

Dr. King delivers an informative telegram to James Hicks, editor of Amsterdam News, regarding the current SCLC initiative to launch a civil rights campaign in Chicago, Illinois. The movement will direct its efforts towards school integration and eradicating the social ills that plague the Northern ghettos. Dr. King asserts "if the problems of Chicago, the Nation's second largest city, can be solved, they can be solved everywhere."

The New York Times: New Way Sought to Teach Rights

Sunday, February 20, 1966

Columbia University and its Teachers College plan to begin a nationwide initiative to improve the teaching of civil rights. The plan will not only apply to elementary and secondary schools but also to college, universities and adult education forums. Instead of using textbooks, teachers will utilize case studies and films to keep information up to date.

Letter from Butler Henderson to MLK

Tuesday, May 23, 1967

Butler Henderson invites Dr. and Mrs. King to the Dinner for the President of Morehouse College, Dr. Benjamin E. Mays.

Invitation from Clarence Williams to MLK

Monday, September 26, 1966

Clarence Williams invites Dr. King to a campaign kick-off rally sponsored by the Dallas County Independent Free Voters Organization.

Letter from A.C. Spectorsky to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968

Editorial Director, A.C. Spectorsky, requests comments from Dr. King regarding an interview with Senator Charles Percy from the April issue of PLAYBOY Magazine. The Illinois Republican
discusses a range of subjects including American military presence in Vietnam, President Lyndon B. Johnson's leadership style, and Negro-white relations.

Salute to Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tuesday, December 11, 1962

This program for "Salute to Martin Luther King Jr." features a performance by the entertainer Sammy Davis, Jr. and an address by Dr. King.