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"Selma, AL"

Letter from Esther Thompson to MLK

Wednesday, November 10, 1965

Esther Thompson inquires if Dr. King and his church could be of assistance with helping her blind husband see again.

Letter from Weston E. Vivian to MLK

Monday, January 11, 1965

Congressman Weston Vivian responds to Dr. King's letter regarding the seating of the Mississippi Congressman. He tells Dr. King that he not only supported the "Ryan fairness resolution" to prevent the seating, but also voted against the motion to swear in the Congressman. Although he mentions that he was in the minority regarding this matter, he assures Dr. King that he will continue to "work for the opening of the Mississippi registration and election procedures."

Draft of Speech On Passage of 1965 Voting Rights Act

Dr. King discusses the prevalence of racial issues in society. Discrimination and segregation still occur but through means in which the government has not declared unconstitutional. One of the main problems discussed was housing discrimination. Many African Americans were forced to live in slum housing in bad areas because they were not able to buy a house in the "white neighborhoods." Dr. King states that this type of social injustice cannot continue if the nation wants to progress.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Tuesday, May 16, 1967

An individual finds it insulting that Dr. King is compared to Abraham Lincoln and would like Dr. King to be remembered as a traitor.

Letter from Henry H. Arrington to Paul Whelehon about P. Ballantine & Sons Employment of Negroes

Thursday, January 12, 1967

The letter references letters between Arrington and John Farrell, regarding the employment of a Negro representative. Mr. Kiah Sayles, a representative of P. Ballantine & Sons, explained that P. Ballantine & Sons was the first company to hire Negro models which elevated Negroes in executive positions. Sayles went on to explain the liberal hiring policy of Coyle Beverage, a distributor of P. Ballantine and Sons.

Letter from Student Suzi Breece to MLK

Cuba, Missouri High School freshman Suzi Breece asks Dr. King to send a letter about why civil rights are important to everyone. She hopes to use his statement as part of a class project.

Monarchianism

Dr. King defines the doctrine monarchianism as "a doctrine stressing the unity of the Godhead as against the ultimately prevailing tendency to affirm personal distinctions within the Godhead."

Thank-U-Gram from June E. Price to MLK

June E. Price sends Dr. King a "Thank-U-Gram" to congratulate him on the inspiring message he recently delivered and his dynamic leadership in the fight for first-class citizenship.

Telegram from Josephine Jones to MLK

Ms. Jones, President of the Metropolitan Community Leaders, writes to Dr. King about Albert Shanker's stance on African American education.

Letter from Samuel Starr to MLK

Friday, January 12, 1968

Mr. Starr shares his thoughts regarding the "negro people," suggesting they go back to Africa and organize civilization under Dr. King's leadership.

Letter from Vice President Hubert Humphrey to MLK Regarding Crisis in Detroit

Thursday, August 3, 1967

In this letter, Vice President of the United States of America, Hubert Humphrey, writes to Dr. King to thank him for his statements promoting nonviolence in the crisis situation in Detroit, Michigan.

Social Ethics

Dr. King refers to Micah 3:9-12, saying the prophet condemns the love of money of civil and religious leaders. King wonders whether religious leaders today should be paid for their work and concludes that money should never be a priority over service.

Note to MLK

Thursday, March 5, 1964

In a brief note, Joan Daves informs Dr. King of an enclosed British publisher's catalogue for his review.

Telegram from Clarence Brinson and Herman T. Osborne to James Meredith and MLK

Sunday, June 26, 1966

Clarence Brinson and Herman T. Osborne salute James Meredith and Dr. King for their service and dedication to the Civil Rights Movement.

John P. Gallagher of the Community Renewal Society, Letter to Dr. King 1967

John Gallagher is writing to Dr. King to promote the initiative of the Community Renewal Society. The society is piloting a project titled Toward Responsible Freedom. The program targets slum areas of Chicago and wants to collaborate with private enterprises to improve the conditions of the environment.

Letter from Hersel Lillard to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968

Lillard writes to Dr. King from the United States Public Health Service Hospital in Lexington Kentucky in hopes that Dr. King will help him because he feels the Court was prejudice against him. He hopes to prevent his injustice from happening to others in his situation. He also mentions two other men, Mulloy and Pratt, about to stand trial and in need of assistance.

Letter from Clayton Yates to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967

Clayton R. Yates informs Dr. King of the Kappa Boule Meeting held on Morehouse College campus with James P. Brawley and Benjamin E. Mays.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to MLK about a Publication

Wednesday, February 15, 1967

In this letter Joan Daves requests Dr. King's input on his chapter, "Black Power." Daves also inquires as to which magazine to send the manuscript first and suggests first sending it to "Life" magazine.

Letter from Mary E. Bull to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

Mary Bull asks Dr. King to reply to an earlier letter, of which she encloses a copy. Mrs. Bull asserts that the Civil Rights Movement made excellent progress up to 1966, but afterwards seemed divided. She wants to know the reasons for this division and asks Dr. King to bring back the supporters who have strayed.

Rio Grande Farm Workers Bulletin

Wednesday, February 1, 1967

This bulletin describes the difficulty that migrant farm laborers have encountered forming organizations to improve economic conditions.

Letter from MLK to a Donor

Dr. King expresses gratitude for a contribution received by The Montgomery Improvement Association.

MLK - Out of the Night of Segregation

Saturday, February 1, 1958

This essay by Dr. King is featured in the February 1958 edition of Lutheran Woman's Work. King focuses on nonviolence and segregation while critiquing the sociological impacts of oppression.

Letter from Barnes and Smith to MLK

Thursday, October 18, 1962

Account Executive M. J. Orman proposes that Dr. King use a reflective decal manufactured by his company as a fundraising item.

Men Who Live Differently

James E. Will shares a Christian perspective on conformity and its relation to humanity and God.

Letter from Jesse L. Jackson to MLK

Tuesday, January 31, 1967

Jesse Jackson writes Dr. King in reference to the efforts of Operation Breadbasket and its fundraising successes. He also expresses to Dr. King the importance of the Support A Worker (SAW) program and encloses information regarding its development.

Esther

Dr. King discusses the religious and moral teachings in the biblical book of Esther.

Immortality

Dr. King addresses the concept of immortality through a quote by Professor Palmer of Harvard University.

Bible 252

This exam from a course entitled "Bible 252" lists forty-eight questions regarding Biblical knowledge.

Request from Virgil Jones to MLK

Wednesday, March 6, 1968

Virgil Jones requests photocopies of letters sent to him on Nov. 9, 1967, as well as some other materials.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Harry Belafonte

Tuesday, May 2, 1967

Here, Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, forwards a list of proposed touring cities to Mr. Harry Belafonte. She also comments on a recent special he did entitled, "Laughter."