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"Selma, AL"

Letter from Doris Everett to MLK

Virginia (VA), Montgomery, AL

Ms. Everett expresses appreciation to Dr. King for leading a successful boycott in Montgomery, Alabama and for his contributions to help Negros obtain equality.

Crusade For Citizenship

Texas (TX), Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Louisiana (LA), North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC), Virginia (VA), Mississippi (MS), Tennessee (TN), Florida (FL), Little Rock, AR, Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL, Memphis, TN, New Orleans, LA, Tallahassee, FL, Atlanta, GA, Louisville, KY

"Crusade For Citizenship," an initiative of the SCLC, illustrates the importance of Negro voters in the South. The brochure incorporates important facts to implement emphasis on how imperative the cause is.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Heussenstamm to MLK about a Humanity Button

Friday, March 1, 1968
California (CA), Washington, D.C.

In this letter Mr. and Mrs. Heussenstamm enclose a button called the "Pentagon of Humanity," which the Heussenstamm's also sent to the President and the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Accordingly the symbol represents “love, unity and wisdom—the community of man.”

Letter from Dora McDonald to MLK

Los Angeles, CA, Philadelphia, PA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Cleveland, OH, Atlanta, GA

Dora McDonald updates Dr. King regarding the numerous letters, invitations, phone calls and other pending business matters while he has been away from the office. During this period of absence, Dr. King had been imprisoned and was now recovering at home.

Who They are and Why They Struck

South Carolina (SC)

This article stresses the unfair treatment of twenty-two Claussen Bakery workers. This article also addresses why the workers went on strike.

Raphael Gould Thanks MLK For Support

Thursday, July 8, 1965
New York (NY), VIETNAM, Ohio (OH)

Gould thanks Dr. King for his letter of support to the Clergymen's Emergency Committee in Vietnam. Gould further approves of King's dialogue printed in Playboy Magazine and encourages him to go on late night TV interview shows to reach a larger population of Americans.

Telegram from Randolph Blackwell to Mr. M. H. Thomas

Friday, August 6, 1965
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Randolph T. Blackwell sends a telegram to M. H. Thomas to permit the SCLC to honor requests for telephone installations made by Carole Hoover.

Birthday Card to MLK

Dr. King receives a birthday card from Margaret, which includes a verse from the book of Matthew.

Financial Report of SCLC

Friday, May 19, 1967

This document is the SCLC's summary of income and disbursements for the fiscal period of May 15-19, 1967.

JFK's Executive Order In Housing

Thursday, December 13, 1962

This document is a draft of an article, written by Dr. King, to be placed in the Amsterdam Newspaper. Dr. King breaks down the housing order signed into law by President Kennedy. He makes clear that housing discrimination is a large hurdle to ending segregation.

SCLC Annual Meeting Plans

Thursday, February 1, 1968
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Dr. King requests that Reverend Ernest Gibbs extends a love offering to the SCLC. This offering will be presented to the organization at a mass rally in Washington, DC.

Old Testament History Notes

ISRAEL, EGYPT

Dr. King records notes from the Old Testament of the Bible. Much of the focus is on Isaiah and the downfall of Jerusalem.

Letter from the US Civil Service Commission to Helyn M. Brooks

Friday, March 26, 1965
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., New York (NY)

The United States Civil Service Commission informs Mrs. Helyn M. Brooks of her prospects for consideration for appointment in a civil service position.Mrs. Brooks' prospects section estimate is listed as poor.

Royalties Summary to MLK from J. Campe

Wednesday, October 5, 1966
New York (NY)

Here J. Campe itemizes the income from Dr. King's various publications including "Why We Can't Wait," "Stride Toward Freedom" and "Strength to Love", for a total of $2202.26.

It's Hard to Be a Christian

Dr. King outlines his sermon entitled "It's Hard to Be a Christian." King asserts that in order for one to be a fully committed Christian he or she must subordinate their ego and prioritize their concern for God's kingdom.

Letter from Rembert Stokes to MLK

Monday, December 16, 1963
Ohio (OH), Cincinnati, OH

The President of Wilberforce University anticipates Dr. King's speech before a delegation of the African Methodist Episcopal Church. Rembert Stokes also notes that Dr. King would receive a donation following his address, to help support the civil rights movement. Stokes wishes that Dr. King's message would center around the AME church leadership's involvement in the freedom struggle.

News from the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc.

Thursday, February 9, 1961
New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA)

The Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. announces their recent involvement with President John F. Kennedy.

Letter from the UN Student Association, Stockholm Branch to MLK

Monday, November 16, 1964
Stockholm, Sweden, SWEDEN

Ulf Sviden, Chairman of the UN Student Association, Stockholm Branch, sends Dr. King a congratulatory letter for his Nobel Peace Prize Award and an invitation to speak to the students of Stockholm.

Telegram from MLK to Attorney General Robert Kennedy

Monday, July 8, 1963
Washington, D.C., Florida (FL), St. Augustine, FL

Dr. King sends Attorney General Robert Kennedy a copy of the telegram he sent to Vice President Lyndon Johnson. The city of St. Augustine, Florida refuses to desegregate its facilities, which Dr. King describes as a "denial of Negro citizenship."

Support Letter to MLK

Thursday, February 1, 1962
California (CA), Ohio (OH)

A Jewish man sends Dr. King a letter expressing his support for "Stride Toward Freedom" and informing Dr. King about his connection to the black community.

Breadbasket and National Tea Agree

Monday, December 12, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Operation Breadbasket teams up with the National Tea Company to improve employment and business opportunities for Negroes.

Letter from Harold Eggers to MLK

Thursday, December 29, 1966

In this letter Harold Eggers, a White supremacist, criticizes the African American race, for what Eggers perceives as an inability to recognize "real leadership ability." However, he does this while commending Dr. King for possessing "real leadership ability."

Letter from Mrs. Sammie Adams to MLK

Monday, April 4, 1966
Georgia (GA)

Mrs. Sammie Adams, a 67-year-old widow, writes an emotional appeal to Dr. and Mrs. King in an effort to collect money for Easter clothes for her children. She acknowledges that she previously donated to Dr. King and the cause for civil rights and would benefit from some assistance.

Royalty Statement for Strength to Love

Thursday, December 31, 1964
New York, NY

Joan Daves issues this royalty statement for a German language edition of Dr. King's Strength to Love. The statement includes the amount earned and number of copies sold.

Telegram from President Johnson to MLK

Thursday, June 23, 1966
Jackson, MS, Philadelphia, MS, Mississippi (MS)

President Lyndon B. Johnson writes to Dr. King sympathizing with his concern over the incidents that occurred in Philadelphia, Mississippi. King was continuing the March Against Fear of James Meredith, who was shot by a sniper on June 6. A rally in Philadelphia commemorating the murder two years earlier of three civil rights activists was angrily attacked by a white mob. Homes of blacks were later sprayed with gunfire.

Letter with Enclosed Copy of Minutes of the SCLC Board Meeting

Wednesday, August 23, 1967
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Kentucky (KY), Louisville, KY, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Virginia (VA)

Mr. Eskridge sends a copy of the minutes for the SCLC Board Meeting to Secretary Dora McDonald. During the meeting, Andrew Young and Ralph David Abernathy address the twenty-eight board members of the organization at the Regency House in Atlanta, GA.

MLK Remarks at The World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

Thursday, May 28, 1964
Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Virginia (VA), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King addresses the 25th anniversary of the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund. Dr. King delivers remarks honoring the work of the Fund in combating the system of racial segregation and striving for human rights. He advocates the need for current civil rights legislation, but finds congressional hesitation frustrating and problematic. Referencing the 1964 Civil Right's Act, King is convinced that if the bill is not passed, the "nation will drift toward its moral and political doom."

Elinor G. Galusha Request "I Have a Dream" by Dr. King 1966

Tuesday, September 6, 1966
Washington, D.C.

This is letter from Elinor G. Glusha requesting permission to reprint Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech in book titled "Words of Faith".

Letter from MLK to Dr. Rubio

Washington, D.C.

In this letter, Dr. King attempts to guide Dr. Rubio to resources that will be helpful in his new endeavors.

Invitation from Charles H. Day to MLK

Wednesday, December 8, 1965
Iowa (IA)

In this letter, Charles H. Day encloses a letter that invites Dr. King to Iowa on the behalf of Reverend Edwin T. Dahlberg.