Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Selma, AL"

Religion

Dr. King paraphrases H. G. Wells.

Telegram from Duncan Wood to MLK

Monday, September 25, 1967

Telegram from Duncan Wood on behalf of the Oslo Committee, hoping to arrange interviews in Moscow with Dr. King and Father Pire.

Publication on Civil Disobedience

Saturday, January 1, 1966

This document on civil disobedience is an occasional paper that includes articles from the legal, philosophical, historical and political science perspective. Throughout the paper there are pieces on Gandhi, Thoreau and Martin Buber; all of whom influenced Dr. King.

Letter from R. Edward Dodge, Jr. to MLK

Saturday, June 19, 1965

This letter dated June 19, 1965, was written to Dr. King from R. Edward Dodge, Jr. In this letter Mr. Dodge, a Caucasian man asks Dr.King if he can help him find integrated housing in Baltimore, Maryland. He will be moving there in a year to study at the John Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. He wants to bring his family with him and he wants his children to interact and become friends with other black children. He asks for Dr. King's help without any fanfare.

Letter from the Speakers Bureau to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1968

The Speakers Bureau writes Dr. King as they are preparing to publish a new edition of the Speakers Booklet for 1968-69. They request Dr. King's biography, topics of discussion, a recent photo, and ask his general availability.

Letter and Questionnaire from Ronald B. Lee to MLK

Ronald B. Lee, a student of American University, requests that Dr. King complete a questionnaire concerning the SCLC's involvement in the June White House Conference "To Fulfill These Rights." The questions include how the SCLC was informed of this meeting, the conference, contributions, and more.

Letter from John Dempsey to S. Ernest Vandiver

Monday, July 30, 1962

Connecticut governor John Dempsey writes to Georgia governor S. Earnest Vandiver expressing his concern for the safety of Dr. King and his associates.

Letter from Fred Bennette to MLK

Friday, April 7, 1967

Director Reverend Bennette requests that Dr. King increase the telephone allowance for Operation Breadbasket, stating that frequent phone calls must be made in order to keep the program active.

Letter from the Seventh Grade Class of Woodward School to MLK

Saturday, February 3, 1968

Anita Davis, Gail Williams, and Joan Rockwell request an interview with Dr. King for their class project.

Letter from Saskatchewan Teachers' Federation

Tuesday, April 19, 1966

Hector G. Trout, Assistant Secretary of the Saskatchewan Teachers' Federation, expresses interest in Dr. King speaking at their teachers' convention.

Letter from MLK to The Honorable E.L. Bartlett

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Alaskan Congressman Edward Lewis Bartlett to express appreciation for his vote in support of passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

In A Land Where Murder is Respectable

This pamphlet, issued by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, features a map of Alabama highlighting 18 murders of African Americans and white civil rights workers.

The Southern Patriot: Today's Hero The Negro Child

This column highlights the brave children who endured the hardships of hostile mobs as they blazed the trail for school integration.

People in Action: Segregation And The Church

Saturday, February 2, 1963

In this New York Amsterdam News article of February 2, 1963, Dr. King mentions writer James Baldwin’s scathing indictment of the Christian Church and states that the Church has been complicit in the system of racial segregation or remained silent on racial injustice, the nation’s most urgent social ill. The church should be the headlight, he states, not the taillight and be true to the prophetic call for justice. King takes hope, however, having just attended the National Conference on Religion and Race in Chicago, which brought together Catholic, Protestant, and Jewish leaders.

Staff of SCLC

The SCLC lists its executive, field and clerical staff.

Montgomery Bus Protest Planning Agenda

This outline documents information regarding the Montgomery Bus Protest.

Letter from Cummins E. Speakman to MLK

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

Dr. Speakman requests that Dr. King recommends the Maunaolu College of Maui to any individuals interested in coming to Hawaii.

Telegram from Howard Farkas to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Mr. Farkas writes Dr. King asking him to address the recent acts of violence targeting African Americans.

The Cartoonist's View: Make Gains In St. Augustine

This column features news on "gains in St. Augustine," and quotations from various sources on civil rights issues.

Letter from Clarence Long to MLK

Friday, August 27, 1965

Congressman Long writes Dr. King delighted to inform him of his full support regarding home rule for the District of Columbia.

Letter from Charles E. Waring to MLK

Wednesday, March 13, 1968

Calling himself "a pale face Christian," Charles E. Waring writes Dr. King to acknowledge that all Christians must aid African Americans in their fight for fair representation and respect as equal human beings. He denounces whites who condemn Dr. King and asks, "what can we white Christians do to help recover the leadership of the Negro cause to worthy men?"

Youth, Nonviolence, and Social Change

The conference on "Youth, Nonviolence, and Social Change" at Howard University contains various speakers deriving from various academic disciplines. Dr. King participated in the lecture and discussed how nonviolent methods impacted individuals, especially the youth.

Letter from Bill Bennett to MLK

Wednesday, January 5, 1966

William Bennett offers the suggestion that the phrase "dark skinned" be used to describe people of color. Bennett encountered the phrase while on a trip in Bermuda, and realized he should enforce the idea that skin color does not determine American citizenship.

Letter from Sheldon Rambell to MLK

Monday, April 17, 1967

Sheldon Rambell congratulates Dr. King on the success of the peace demonstrations in New York. He also compliments Dr. King's confidence and strength illustrated through his appearance on CBS.

Letter from Reese High School Student to MLK

Tuesday, November 21, 1967

Ann Renwick, a senior at Reese High School, informs Dr. King of a term paper she is writing about him and requests information regarding his next visit to Detroit. She also expresses discontent with prejudices against Negros in her small all-white town, but is determined to change the mentality of her peers.

Introduction of Senator Edward M. Kennedy by MLK

Monday, August 8, 1966

Dr. King introduces the SCLC's guest speaker, Senator Edward Kennedy at a conference in Jackson, Mississippi.

MLK Statement Regarding Desegregation

Thursday, May 24, 1962

Dr. King discusses the end of the Old South and segregation. He lists urbanization, federal intervention and the unrest of Negroes as key ingredients in breaking down the old system.

Traditionalism

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman’s “Introduction to Philosophy.”

Letter from James Harrison to Otis Roberts

Friday, December 22, 1967

James Harrison, SCLC's comptroller, explains an itemized breakdown of finances related to a grant from the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.

Letter from Bea Lazar to Dora McDonald

Friday, December 22, 1961

Bea Lazar thanks Miss McDonald for sending a copy of a recent speech given by Dr. King. She praises the speech as a lesson that Americans "sorely need." She also encloses a contribution to the SCLC as a Christmas present.