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"Selma, AL"

Letter from EEOC Commissioner Samuel C. Jackson to MLK

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Commissioner Samuel Jackson sends Dr. King a copy of the First Annual Report of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

Letter from J. L. Richard to MLK

Wednesday, March 24, 1965

Reverend J. L. Richard, from Evergreen Baptist Church, sends prayers for Dr. King and the Negro race. Richard also sends a monetary contribution to the SCLC.

Draft Letter from MLK to Reverend Jackson

Dr. King replies to Rev. Jackson's letter of April 22. He apologizes for the delay and assures Rev. Jackson that he will send thank you messages to everyone listed in his initial letter. Dr. King also tells Rev. Jackson that he hopes their friendship has not been affected by recent circumstances.

Letter from MLK to Arthur B. Jestice

Thursday, December 21, 1967

Dr. King declines a speaking engagement at the St. Andrew's Street Baptist Church due to some "programmatic plans." Dr. King asks if it is possible to meet in the future.

The Student Movement and You

This handbill calls for a boycott on Rich's and A & P in response to their discriminatory practices in employment and services to the Negro population of Atlanta, Georgia.

SCLC Newsletter: July 1963

This SCLC newsletter features numerous articles written by members of the SCLC regarding Birmingham, Alabama. Also featured is a graphic story of the crisis in Birmingham.

SCLC Launches Chicago Political Drive

The SCLC releases a statement regarding the launching of a Chicago Political Drive, sponsored by the SCLC and the Coordinating Council of Community Organizations. SCLC Southern Project Director, Hosea Williams, will head the campaign. The focuses of this campaign are voter registration and education.

A Look to the Future

Monday, September 2, 1957

Dr. King addresses the Highlander Folk School during the organization's twenty-fifth anniversary. He discusses the many accomplishments and hurdles of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Amelia Jones to MLK and the SCLC

Friday, February 18, 1966

The Toldeo NAACP Branch invites Dr. King to be their keynote speaker. Amelia Jacobs Jones, representing the NAACP, requests that suggested dates regarding Dr. King's availability be forwarded to her.

Letter from MLK to Senator J. Glenn Bealll

Monday, June 22, 1964

Dr. King thanks Senator J. Glenn Beall for supporting the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Address Before the United Packinghouse Workers of America

At their Thirteenth Constitutional Convention in Minneapolis on May 21, 1962, Dr. King praises the United Packinghouse Workers Union of America for their dedication to civil rights. He states that the civil rights and labor movements share in common a concern for minimum wages, social security, health benefits, decent housing, job security and retirement security. He thanks them for the aid that they have provided and encourages them to continue fighting for equality.

Special to the New York Times: A Cry of Hate or a Cry for Help

Dr. King addresses the recent riots occurring in the county of Watts near Los Angeles. He believes the riots are not solely race-driven but are also motivated by unemployment. The riots are utilized as a way to be heard, and not as a way to destroy.

Letter from Rabbi Martin E. Katzenstein to MLK

Thursday, September 26, 1963

Rabbi Martin Katzenstein writes Dr. King to express appreciation for Dr. King's participation in the worship service at Temple Israel in St. Louis, Missouri. He expresses the impact that Dr. King's address had on the congregation and the African American community in St. Louis. He encloses contributions from church service and a check to cover Dr. King's travel expenses.

Civil-Righters Isolation

Saturday, April 1, 1967

David Lawrence states that the recent initiatives of Negro leaders are hindering the overall mission of the Civil Rights Movement. He believes that Negro groups are defeating their own cause.

An Order For the Baptism of Adults

Dr. King outlines the order of the baptism service, including specific phrases for the minister to use.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Friday, May 19, 1967

Ms. Daves informs Ms. McDonald that permission has been given to the High Commission of India's Education Department to publish a Marathi version of "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Alden Bryant to MLK

Wednesday, April 20, 1966

Alden Bryant outlines a plan to assist with voter registration in the South by increasing the number of registrars. Bryant details how the process took place in Berkeley, California as an example. He requests a response from Dr. King to the plan.

Letter from Harold Eggers to MLK

Thursday, December 29, 1966

In this letter Harold Eggers, a White supremacist, criticizes the African American race, for what Eggers perceives as an inability to recognize "real leadership ability." However, he does this while commending Dr. King for possessing "real leadership ability."

Letter from MLK to Mr. Warren Chippindale

Wednesday, July 27, 1966

Dr. King writes to respond to Mr. Chippindale's invitation to have Dr. King speak in Montreal. He states that due to prior engagements, he will not be able to accept the invitation.


Dr. King provides a definition of the term supralapsarianism.

Stokely Carmichael Requests MLK Photo

Thursday, October 20, 1966

Julia Polk of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, asks for an autographed photo of Dr. King for Stokely Carmichael's collection.


Dr. King quotes Tertullian on the subject of love from “Adversus Marcionem.”

Refinement By Fire

This brochure provides an overview of the SCLC Citizenship Education Program held at the Dorchester Community Center in Georgia.

Letter from Linda Frawley to MLK

Sunday, March 24, 1968

Linda Frawley, the campus coordinator for Suffolk University, requests any "pseudo-campaign" materials that Dr. King may be able to send. The materials are to be used in the National Intercollegiate Presidential Primary, sponsored by Time Magazine.

Letter from Robert T. Handy to MLK

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

Robert Handy of the Union Theological Seminary invites Dr. King to be the "major evening speaker" for their Conference on Race and Religion.

Letter from June Gordon to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

June Gordon, as the Executive Director of the Emma Lazarus Federation of Jewish Women's Clubs, issues a check to SCLC. They also pledge to assist other civil rights groups involved in the struggle for equality.

If I Can Help Somebody

These are the words to a song written in 1945 by Alma Bazel Androzzo that was made famous by gospel singer Mahalia Jackson. Dr. King quotes this song in his Drum Major Instinct sermon delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church on February 4, 1968.

News Release from Congressman John Conyers Jr.

Sunday, October 1, 1967

Congressman John Conyers, Jr. requests that a conference be held including Negro elected officials to support his thirty billion dollar bill to help the nation's ghettos.

Letter Requesting Help From MLK

Wednesday, April 20, 1966

An unidentified North Carolina man writes Dr. King requesting urgent assistance involving his brutal arrest by a state trooper. According to the man, the trooper physically assaulted him during detainment and ended up breaking two ribs. However, his other peers, mainly Negro, are too afraid to speak up about this police brutality case.

Letter from Eric Weinburger to MLK

Friday, April 7, 1967

Mr. Eric Weinburger requests the assistance of Dr. King in publicizing the Committee for Nonviolent Action's tax refusal campaign.