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"Selma, AL"

Letter from Manley Brudvig to MLK about an Autograph

Wednesday, July 6, 1966

In this letter Manley Brudvig asks Dr. King for his autograph on the enclosed Newsweek cover.

Sermon on Conformity Thought "Nonconformist - J. Bond"

Sunday, January 16, 1966

Dr. King in this sermon at Ebenezer Baptist Church speaks to his congregation on the topic of disent. He expresses in detail about how we essentially must not conform to standards set by society.

The Negotiating Committee and Housing

Thursday, May 12, 1966

This statement by the Negotiation Committee lists several improvements made to an African American housing community. The Committee explains that the changes are only on a trial basis and therefore, the community will still picket until permanent changes are made.

Memo from Clarence Jones to MLK

Clarence Jones sends Dr. King an article regarding the increasing number of blacks being elected into local governments in the Deep South. Also included is in article informing readers that Jones has been named partner in a member firm of the New York Stock Exchange.

Receipt to the Motown Record Corporation

Monday, October 3, 1966

The following receipt was issued by the SCLC to the Motown Record Corporation for their financial contribution.

Letter from MLK to Ruth Huston

Wednesday, July 17, 1963

Dr. King sends a copy of "Strength to Love" and "Letter from Birmingham City Jail" to his friend Ruth Huston of New York City. Jokingly, Dr. King characterizes what Huston's reaction might be to "Strength to Love," due to Huston's own personal beliefs about religion. He emphasized that she may be disinterested in reading the book of sermons, but "on the other hand they may give you some religion."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dean Rhoda Dorsey of Goucher College

Friday, June 26, 1964

Dora McDonald conveys Dr. King's delight in knowing that Dean Rhoda Dorsey of Coucher College will include "Letter from Birmingham Jail" on their school's reading list. She urges Dean Dorsey to purchase Dr. King's recent book "Why We Can't Wait," which contains the full text of the letter.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, January 24, 1968

Joan Daves contacts Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, regarding the payment from the Canadian Broadcasting series in the amount of $5,000. Daves further discusses the galley of lectures that are to be checked and released by Dr. King for publication in Canada. In addition to Dr. King, Stanley Levison will also be reviewing the galleys.

Happiness

Dr. King outlines insight from philosophers Spinoza and Nietzsche regarding the concept of happiness.

Letter from MLK to Marion Jordan

Friday, May 4, 1956

Dr. King apologizes to Mrs. Marion Jordon and the Pittsburgh branch of the NAACP for the lack of acknowledgment for their contribution to the Montgomery Improvement Association. He expresses appreciation for their support and provides a report of their total contributions.

God

Dr. King notes that Jeremiah 9:23 speaks of man's ability to know and understand God in contrast to modern theology's claim that God is beyond knowing.

Neighborhood Stabilization: A Program

Sunday, May 1, 1966

The Southern Regional Council issues a special report regarding neighborhood stabilization. The report investigates minority housing in majority white communities. The report states that realtors victimize Negro residents and lead white residents to believe that Negroes cause property decline. The report also features a step-by-step self-help plan for a more organized, unified and stabilized community.

Letter from Dr. Herman Klugman

Thursday, October 15, 1964

Dr. Herman Klugman, Dr. King's German-language tutor at Boston University, offers his congratulations on the coveted Nobel Peace Prize. He states that, as a Jew whose people experienced Nazi persecution, he has watched the "Gleichberechtigung" (equal rights) struggle with deep emotion.

Invitation to the 118th Anniversary of Liberian Independence to Dr. and Mrs. King

The Permanent Representative of Liberia to the United Nations, Milton Nathaniel Barnes, invites Dr. and Mrs. King to attend a celebration of the 118th Anniversary of Liberia's independence. The reception was held in New York in July, 1965.

Three Dimensions of a Complete Life

Dr. King delivers a sermon that urges his listeners to search for their purpose in life. He requests that his younger listeners attend school and strive for higher education. He stresses to not let the color of their skin keep them from achieving their dreams.

Letter from SNCC's Dorothy Miller to MLK

Monday, March 25, 1963

Dorothy Miller of SNCC writes Dr. King informing him of the arson attempt at the SNCC office and thanks him for a previous correspondence regarding the case of Bob Zellner.

Telegram from Supporters to MLK

This telegram of support was sent to Dr. King while incarcerated in the Bessemer County Jail.

Walk for Freedom

In this article, Dr. King address the issue of racism occurring in Montgomery. It was here that African Americans, including Dr. King, were victims to humiliation and violent acts because of their race. Dr. King further promote nonviolent protest to combat this civil injustice.

Telegram from MLK to Mrs. W.E. Anderson

Friday, June 9, 1967

Dr. King sends his condolences to the wife of Dr. Anderson and assures her that they will continue the noble endeavors that Dr. Anderson began.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

The author objects to Dr. King's journey to Jerusalem with his followers. He also expresses his perception of the Negro race.

Letter From Henry Springs Jr. to MLK

Friday, September 2, 1966

Mr. Henry Springs requests Dr.King's help in creating "Action Programs," that would be beneficial to the African-American community in Lake County, Illinois.

MLK Memo on the Civil Rights Bill

Dr. King initialed this memo praising the passage of the civil rights bill. The memo points out that its passage is a "bright interlude" in the struggle for civil rights.

Background of the Speakers

This document lists speakers for rallies in New York and San Francisco and gives a short biography of each person. The speakers include people such as Dr. Benjamin Spock, Dr. King, Rev. James Bevel, Floyd McKissick, Julian Bond and others. The document also lists folk singers for each rally location, a list that includes Pete Seeger.

Invitation from the Negro American Labor Council to MLK

Wednesday, December 8, 1965

On behalf of the Negro American Labor Council, August Hill invites Dr. King to visit Racine, Wisconsin. He tells Dr. King that they are suffering from problems regarding employment in addition to all of the other inequalities. He also says that their community is not involved and that they need to be concerned about the issues in their society.

Letter From Harry A. Ploski to MLK

Tuesday, September 13, 1966

Harry A. Ploski writes Dr. King concerning a book he and Professor Roscoe Brown have written. Hoping to solicit endorsement, he encloses a copy of the table of contents and an outline of the topics addressed.

Telegram from Charles Cogen to MLK

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Charles Cogen, President of the American Federation of Teachers, writes Dr. King a note expressing that there is national shame because Dr. King is in jail for defending constitutional rights. He also informs Dr. King that they are making their outrage known publicly.

What Shall We Do to Be Saved

This is an outline for a sermon given by Dr. King, entitled, "What Shall We Do To Be Saved?" It includes an intended introduction. The date and location for which this sermon was delivered is unknown.

Telegram from HEW-OEO to MLK

Jule M. Sugarman and Dr. Mary E. Switzer invite Dr. King to join a two-day meeting with the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare and the Office of Economic Opportunity, to discuss day care legislation.

Amsterdam Article

This document describes the fight for civil rights in Mississippi in the early 1960's.

Letter from William Mallory to MLK

Friday, July 2, 1965

Mr. Mallory writes to Dr. King proposing a national day to be observed by all Negroes. The three purposes of this day are to instill racial pride, demonstrate the contributions of Negroes and to preserve the heritage of American Negroes.