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"San Francisco, CA"

Pilgrimage for Democracy

Sunday, December 15, 1963

Dr. King makes an address at the "Pilgrimage for Democracy" in Atlanta during the winter of 1963. He opens with the Supreme Courts ruling to cease segregation in schools and how Atlanta served as the "epitome of social progress." He continues to elaborate on how the city needs to continue its desegregation efforts to achieve justice. Dr. King numerically highlights the inadequacies of the integrated schools in Atlanta and expresses the reality of the continuing segregation in the city's public accommodations.

Letter from Philip H. Partridge to Hon. Stephen Young Regarding Evil Commentary

Tuesday, January 11, 1966

In this letter to Mr. Young, Mr. Partridge outlines a series of "attacks" that have been placed against him following his public speech based on political opinions.

Letter from Constance A. Price to David J. Hahn

Wednesday, May 31, 1967

Constance Price informs David Hahn, Colorado State Senator, of how she has suffered for the past twelve years due to the violation of her constitutional rights as guaranteed by the Workman's Compensation Act of Colorado.

Letter from Richard Dobbins to SCLC

Thursday, August 11, 1966

The Fabulous Two Restaurant invites Coordinating Council of Community Organizations and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference to a dinner on behalf of Dr. King.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding ?Why We Can?t Wait? Royalties

Tuesday, January 17, 1967

In this letter Campe encloses payment from Econ Verlag for ?Why We Can?t Wait? royalties.

New Harassment: The Lunacy Test by MLK

Saturday, June 23, 1962

Dr. King identifies events that demonstrate the absurd actions of the racist opposition during the Freedom Movement in the South.

Telegram from MLK to Sargent Shriver

Dr. King writes Mr. Shriver to offer assistance to farmers who have been treated unfairly.

Discerning the Signs of History

Dr. King's sermon "Discerning the Signs of History" asserts "evil carries the seeds of its own destruction." King gives examples throughout history, such as slavery, colonialism, and the rise and fall of King Louis XVI.

Letter from Culbert G. Rutenber to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Professor Rutenber, of Andover Newton Theological School, writes Dr. King on behalf of Lovic Dean, an African American minister, who has requested Dr. King send him "the best books" to build a library on the subject of pacifism.

Statement from MLK Regarding Albany Movement

Wednesday, August 1, 1962

While serving a forty-five day sentence alongside Ralph D. Abernathy, Dr. King releases a statement expressing his appreciation for President Kennedy's support of the Albany Movement.

Letter from Arthur V. Hamman to MLK about Spirituality

Monday, June 19, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Hamman lectures Dr. King on the concept of heaven and hell, asserting that there is no race, nationality, etc., before God.

Letter from Lillian Mirvus to MLK

Thursday, May 25, 1967

Lillian Mirvis writes to Dr. King regarding his invitation to Walter P. Reuther to speak at the 10th Annual Convention of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

God (Niebuhr Conception)

Dr. King quotes American theologian Reinhold Niebuhr regarding the subject of God.

Letter From Maria Diego to Dr. King

Thursday, November 18, 1965

Maria Diego requests assistance from Dr. King to aid in funding a new Catholic school building in Japan.

What is the OIC Institute?

This brochure for the Opportunities Industrialization Center describes what it provides for students with the characteristics and training needed to develop an accelerated professional caliber for employment.

SCLC Mail Log: February 23, 1968

Friday, February 23, 1968

This is a one-day mail log for incoming mail addressed to Dr. King and other SCLC associates. As an organizational tactic, the log kept track of the high volume of correspondence that came through the office.

Excerpts of Letters Written About Vietnam War

This document includes excerpts from letters written by Mary Agnes Blonien, sister of an American nurse at the Minh Quy Hospital at Kontum, South Vietnam. Moved to the point of tears, the nurse shares her thoughts and gives a vivid account of the war conditions in Vietnam, and expresses empathy for both Americans and Vietnamese.

Brotherhood Cannot Be a Theory

Friday, February 19, 1965

This newspaper clipping of The Southern Israelite features segments on the Atlanta banquet honoring Dr. King's acceptance of the Nobel Peace Prize. Given on his return to the States, there were twelve hundred and fifty Atlanta citizens in attendance. Included articles are: welcoming comments by Rabbi Jacob Rothschild, a tribute by Archbishop Paul Hallinan, and a transcription of Dr. King's speech.

Letter from A. Bohdan to MLK

Wednesday, April 14, 1965

A. Bohdan, catering manager of Sydney, Australia's Chevron Hotel, writes Dr. King in request of his favorite meal to include on a special menu featuring dishes of other "famous personalities in Politics, Industry, and Art."

Letter from Ralph J. Bunche to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964

Ralph Bunche inquires if Dr. King and his wife will be available for lunch and dinner with himself and members of the United Nations before leaving for Oslo.

Letter from W. L. Overholser to MLK

Saturday, August 13, 1966

W.L. Overholser of Winnimac, Indiana proposes that the SCLC change its tactics and support the Peace Welfare Party that he is forming. He maintains that, because too few people control too much of the country's wealth, a lack of jobs creates too much feuding and racial prejudice. Overholser argues that neither party can serve both the richest 10%, who control all the wealth, and the other 90% of the country, because the disparity makes most politicians two-faced. Overholser feels that whites and blacks should focus on forming a new party, and asks Dr.

Letter from the American Committee on Africa Regarding South Africa's Participation in the Olympics

Thursday, January 11, 1968

George M. Houser, Executive Director of the American Committee on Africa, informs readers of the International Olympic Committee's upcoming meeting that will discuss the 1968 Olympics. Mr. Houser encloses a paper regarding the history of South Africa and the Olympics to help urge the committee to reconsider granting South Africa permission to participate in the Olympics.

Get Well Letter from Albert Adams to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Saturday, September 20, 1958

Out of the many well wishes sent to Dr. King, he received one in particular from this New York inmate, Albert Adams. Mr. Adams wished Dr. King a full recovery and prayed that he would not, again, endure the same hardship.

Letter from Sheldon Rambell to MLK

Monday, April 17, 1967

Sheldon Rambell congratulates Dr. King on the success of the peace demonstrations in New York. He also compliments Dr. King's confidence and strength illustrated through his appearance on CBS.

Telegram from Linda Gortmaker to MLK

Wednesday, February 2, 1966

Linda Gortmaker requests an interview with Dr. King for the Proviso West Profile.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, November 11, 1963

Mrs. Joan Daves references an enclosure of two copies of the Swedish-language edition of "Strength to Love," along with an advanced payment for the return of a signed copy.

Letter from Tommie Crockett to MLK

Tommie Crockett expresses his appreciation for the work of Dr. King. He explains that black people are getting tired of the nonviolence method and are beginning to embrace the term, "Black Power." He explains that blacks will no longer participate in peaceful civil rights demonstrations because, "we already done that."

Aristotle

Dr. King cites Aristotle's ideas regarding matter and form.

Letter from Minnie Summers Lindsey to MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967

Mrs. Lindsey asks Dr. King for a copy of a speech she recently heard on the radio and his "Letter from Birmingham Jail."

Letter from MLK to Joel Crittenden

Dr. King responds to Joel Crittenden's concern about white hatred toward Negroes by making two points: 1) some whites have given their lives in the freedom struggle, and 2) hatred and violence must be met with love and nonviolence.