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Letter from James P. Dixon of Antioch College to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965

James P. Dixon, President of Antioch College, thanks Dr. King for accepting an invitation to speak at the school's commencement ceremony.

Letter from Phillip O. Foss to MLK

Monday, February 13, 1967

Phillip O. Foss requests permission to use excerpts from "Letter from Birmingham Jail".

Letter from Robert L. Green to Dora McDonald Regarding Dr. King's Biological Sketch

Monday, January 22, 1968

This letter from Robert L. Green, Associate Professor, Michigan State University to Dora McDonald is to request copy of Dr. King's biographical sketch to be forwarded to an individual at Yeshiva University. The biographical sketch will be used in conjunction with Dr. King's paper "The Role of Behavioral Scientist in the Civil Rights Movement" which will be published in the American Psychological Association Journal and the Journal of Social Issues.

Letter from Governor Nelson Rockefeller to MLK

Wednesday, August 15, 1962

Governor Nelson Rockefeller encloses a contribution of $5,000 to the SCLC and discusses the forthcoming voter registration drive in which the SCLC will conduct.

God - His Imminence

Dr. King takes notes on the immanence of God and quotes Victorian poet Alfred Tennyson's "The Higher Pantheism."

Who Are We?

Saturday, February 5, 1966

In this sermon Dr. King contemplates "who are we?" and "what is man?". He differentiates between the pessimistic attitudes of the materialistic understandings of man and the optimistic attitudes of humanistic definitions of man. King also states that man is neither all good nor all bad, but a combination. Man is both an everlasting miracle and mystery.

Letter from Kenneth Bells to Floyd McKissick

Friday, September 16, 1966

Kenneth Bells requests to be removed from the Congress of Racial Equality's list of potential contributors due to CORE's support of the Black Power Movement.

Letter from Dr. King to Earnest Dale

Tuesday, January 23, 1968

This letter serves to acknowledge Earnest Dale's missed call to Dr. King and to thank Professor Dale for his support.

Letter of Support from Vivian Gourevitch to MLK

Wednesday, July 27, 1966

Supporter Vivian Gourevitch writes Dr. King to stress her belief that "Black Power" is a dangerous slogan.

Draft of I Have a Dream

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

This version of Dr. King's famous "I Have a Dream" speech reveals important changes to ideas and phrases that Dr. King chose either to alter or omit completely the day he addressed the throng gathered before the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. Dr. King's argument against the "normalcy" of bigotry remained a key message on the day he took the podium.

Letter from Helen F. Gallagher to MLK

Tuesday, February 13, 1968

Helen Gallagher is addressing the national issues in the United States as it relates to the war. She suggests to Dr. King a personal tax that could possibly go toward initiatives that Americans feel are important. Gallagher feels that this is a way to for Americans to represent themselves when they are unsatisfied with their congressional representatives.

King and SCLC Meet in Montgomery

This press release announces a mass meeting held in Montgomery, Alabama by the Executive Board of SCLC. The meeting was held in response to a major libel suit against four prominent SCLC officials. Dr. King gives an address to boost morale during the course of this suit. In Dr. King's view, "The South has lost its solidity. Whites fight against whites over desegregation. Be it known, evil cannot permanently organize itself." The libel suit came to be known as the New York Times Company vs. Sullivan (1960).

1963 World Day of Prayer

Friday, March 5, 1965

This brochure from the United Church Women of Atlanta, sent to Ms. Coretta Scott King, outlines the agenda for 1965 World Day of Prayer. The brochure allso included is a schedule of the organization's calendar of events.

Letter from Ann Lincoln to MLK

Thursday, June 24, 1965

The writer, who identifies herself as a "collateral descendent of Abraham Lincoln," relates a story involving a young colored girl to Dr. King. Ms. Lincoln explains that the incident disturbed her greatly and she feels it is time to educate Negros on white acceptance.

Letter to Mr. Otwell from Dr. King Regarding the Request for an Article for the Chicago Sun-Times

Monday, March 30, 1964

Dr. King informs Mr. Otwell that, due to prior obligations, he will not be able to write the article for the Sunday edition as requested. However, he assures Mr. Otwell that he will look into the possibility of editing a section of "Why We Can't Wait" to be published instead.

Letter from Viva O. Sloam to CORE Members

Tuesday, June 19, 1962

Viva O. Sloam, sends a letter to members of the Congress for Racial Equality regarding integration in a Kentucky neighborhood.

Letter from MLK to Rev. E. Wayne Roberts

Sunday, January 3, 1965

Dr. King writes Rev. E. Wayne Roberts in support of his fellow friend and SCLC Co-Founder Rev. C. K. Steele, Jr. He notes Rev. Steele as "a thorough and competent pastor" that exemplifies the teachings of Jesus Christ.

Letter from Reynold Moody to MLK

Reynold Moody, a retired Lieutenant Colonel in the United States Marine Corps, expresses support to Dr. King on behalf of the Miami, Florida Veterans for Peace.

Letter from Paul D. Metzger to MLK

Tuesday, November 3, 1964

Paul D. Metzger, President of the Student Association at Central High School, writes Dr. King inviting him to speak at a forum concerning the issues of civil rights in America. Dr. King's response to this invitation is enclosed at the culmination of the letter.

Letter from Joan Daves to Tetsuo Kohmoto

Monday, April 13, 1964

In this letter Joan Daves informs Tetsuo Kohmoto that his letter to Dr. King has come. Joan also says that the terms are being worked out with Katahira of Charles E. Tuttle Co. The letter closes by telling Mr. Kohmoto that he will be hearing more about the matter.

Poems Entitled "Black Power," "Beyond Anger," and "Sins Of The Father"

In this document, there are three poems: "Black Power", "Beyond Anger" and "Sins Of The Father".

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Sodd

Dr. King writes to Mrs. Sodd regarding her concerns for fair and just treatment.

Remarks at the University of Wisconsin Law School

Tuesday, March 8, 1960

Harris Wofford, Jr. gives these remarks at the University of Wisconsin Law School on March 8, 1960. Wofford has several ties with Dr. King in cases such as arranging a trip to India, helping to write "Stride Toward Freedom," and negotiating with Senator Kennedy and Vice-President Nixon during the 1960 presidential campaign. In addition, Wofford was the Special Assistant for Civil Rights under U. S. Attorney General Robert Kennedy.

Letter from Arthur LeSueur to MLK

Friday, May 12, 1967

Arthur LeSueur, a War World II veteran, expresses his support of Dr. King's endeavors to gain equality in America. He hopes that Dr. King will not be discouraged by the great injustices he has faced and will continue to hold strong to his position.

Letter to MLK from John Yeck

Tuesday, August 8, 1967

Yeck asks Dr. King to think about the connotations of the words "black" and "Negro." He feels that the word "black" contains a separating connotation, and the word "Negro" a unifying one.

Letter From MLK to Pastor Charles Westphal

Monday, November 8, 1965

Dr. King thanks Pastor Westphal for the opportunity to address the French Protestant Federation.

Letter from MLK to Vincenso Lapiccirella

Thursday, January 14, 1965

Dr. King thanks Dr. Lapiccirella for his invitation to participate in a program in Florence, Italy.

Letter from Laurence V. Kirkpatrick to MLK

Friday, May 28, 1965

Laurence Kirkpatrick writes Dr. King on behalf of the World Convention of Churches and Christ expressing their appreciation for Dr. King's acceptance of their invitation and discusses the travel logistics.

Spirit

Dr. King records some thoughts on the meaning of "spirit."

Telegram to Dr. King Regarding "Camp In At the United States Senate"

Friday, October 27, 1967

In this letter, Lucious President share his opinion about Dr. King's actions at the Senate. "A massive camp in at the United States Senate is contrary to God's teaching. You will not have God on your side."