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Letter from MLK to Mr. C.G. Christian

Wednesday, August 22, 1962
Birmingham, AL

Dr. King sends this letter of recommendation, on behalf of Reverend John Thomas Porter, to the Pulpit Committee of Sixth Avenue Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. Following the death of Dr. Goodgame, Dr. King nominates without reservation, Reverend Porter who he calls, "one of the finest men on the ministerial horizon."

Letter from Paul Noe to MLK

Wednesday, December 6, 1967
Illinois (IL), New York (NY), New York, NY

Mr. Noe shares his ideas and comments with Dr. King regarding the Civil Rights Movement. Mr. Noe describes the Civil Rights Movement as the "exclusive domain of the black man" and discusses how he has felt very left out of the movement due to his race. He hopes that the Civil Rights Movement will become the "domain of all Americans" and will change its appeal from racism to decency.

Contribution Letter from Motown Records

Thursday, September 5, 1963
Detroit, MI

As indicated in a recording agreement with Dr. King, Esther Edwards, Vice President of Motown Records, sends $200.00 to the SCLC.

Letter from Joseph T. Beaver to MLK

Wednesday, October 1, 1958
MEXICO, Cincinnati, OH, Ohio (OH), San Francisco, CA, LIBERIA, Oslo, Norway, New York (NY), Illinois (IL)

Joseph Beaver, Jr. sends his sympathy to Dr. King following the attempt on Dr. King's life. He had originally included a biography of Wendell Phillips Dabney.

John Locke

Dr. King records a quote from English political theorist John Locke on the development of the human mind.

Letter from Joseph W. Williams to MLK

Wednesday, November 4, 1964
Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Detroit, MI, South Africa

Joseph W. Williams congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Laurence Pollinger to Joan Daves

Wednesday, May 3, 1967

In this letter, Laurence Pollinger Limited writes to Joan Daves, Literary Agent for Dr. King, to make an offer for the advances and royalties to be received from the publication of "Where Do We Go From Here?" A request is also made for permission to change the title to Chaos or Community.


Dr. King references German philosopher, George Hegal, in this handwritten notecard.

Letter from Don Edwards to MLK

Thursday, February 25, 1965
Washington, D.C., California (CA), Atlanta, GA, Selma, AL

Representative Don Edwards of California sends his gratitude to Dr. King for a recent letter. Edwards informs Dr. King that they are currently drafting legislation to amend the Civil Rights Act.

Letter from MLK to a Donor

Montgomery, AL

Dr. King expresses gratitude for a contribution received by The Montgomery Improvement Association.

Letter to Dr. Abernathy from Rev. Parker

Wednesday, May 1, 1968
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Rev. Ralph Abernathy, President of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, received this correspondence following the assassination of Dr. King. In this letter, Rev. Richard Parker of the St. Cross Episcopal Church in California, highlighted his interest in a television interview of Mrs. King, shown on the day of Dr. King's funeral.

Telegram from Reverend William Coffin to MLK

Sunday, May 5, 1963
Connecticut (CT), Atlanta, GA

Clergyman and peace activis William Sloane Coffin sends a telegram to Dr. King or "anyone in charge" informing them of his possible travel plans to Atlanta. Reverend Coffin provides telephone numbers and requests a response.

Telegram from Sargent Shriver to Coretta King

Tuesday, November 14, 1967
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Sargent Shriver, American statesmen, activist, founder of Job Corps and Peace Crops, expresses gratitude for Mrs. King's public endorsement of the war against poverty.

Letter from MLK to Miss R. Berkenvelder

Monday, November 22, 1965

Dr. King writes to Miss Berkenvelder, agreeing that silent and non-active individuals maintained the severity of injustices. He further elaborates on his prayer that warriors will form who are committed to nonviolence and world peace.

Dorothy Cotton telegraphs congratulations

Sunday, January 31, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New York (NY), New York, NY

Dorothy Cotton, long-time colleague of Dr. King at Southern Christian Leadership Conference, congratulates Dr. King for being nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize. Cotton was one of the only non-family members to subsequently accompany Dr. King to Oslo, Norway, for the prize ceremony.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King notes Herbert Spencer’s definition of religion.

Letter from Katarina Ungdomsrad to MLK

Wednesday, November 25, 1964
Stockholm, Sweden

Dr. King is invited to speak to the social democratic youth club "Katarina." The representatives of Katarina wish he would be able to speak "about peace in our time." The planned date of the event follows a day after Dr. King is awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo.

Letter from W. C. Dobbins to MLK

Wednesday, May 29, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Florida (FL), Birmingham, AL

W.C. Dobbins, of the Pensacola Council of Ministers, follows up with Dr. King to request his presence at a mass meeting to be held in either September or October.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Robert Kennedy

Monday, November 28, 1966
Washington, D.C.

Dora McDonald, Dr. King's secretary, informs Senator Robert F. Kennedy that Dr. King has accepted the invitation to appear before the subcommittee on Executive Reorganization.

Letter from the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament to MLK

UNITED KINGDOM, London, England, Washington, D.C.

Canon L. John Collins, a founder of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, invites Dr. King to speak at a rally in Trafalgar Square in London, England. The proposed rally will be based on the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, and Collins would like to provide a direct link between the rally and the Washington March through the participation of both Bayard Rustin and Dr. King.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Henry R. Luce

Friday, February 15, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY

Dora McDonald writes to Henry Luce, of Time & Life, in response to his prior correspondence to Dr. King.

Letter from Carl Albert to MLK

Friday, October 20, 1967
Oklahoma (OK), Washington, D.C.

In this letter, U.S. Congressman Carl Albert offers his gratitude to Dr. King regarding a letter he sent to him about problems in the country.

Letter from MLK to S. Dillon Ripley at the Smithsonian Institute

Friday, May 21, 1965
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King informs S. Dillon Ripley, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, that he is unable to attend the bicentennial celebration of the birth of James Smithson.

Telegram from Oslo, Norway to Dora McDonald

Thursday, November 5, 1964
NORWAY, Oslo, Norway, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King receives this telegram as an advance welcome to Oslo, Norway and to confirm lodging reservations for him and his associates.

The Eternality of God Verses The Temporality of Man

This document is an outline of the sermon titled "The Eternality of God Versus the Temporality of Man." In the first two sections, Dr. King contrasts the time-conditioned nature of man with God, who transcends time. The final portion highlights a significant fact that God is absolute and unchangeable.

Letter from MLK to the Nobel Institute

Wednesday, January 25, 1967
Oslo, Norway, VIETNAM

Dr. King nominates Thich Nhat Hanh, a Buddhist monk from Vietnam, for the Nobel Peace Prize. He describes Hanh's accomplishments and assures that he is "an apostle of peace and non-violence.

The Bill of Rights Poem

Monday, July 30, 1962
New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. Alfred G. Suarez writes a poem regarding the necessity of the Bill of Rights.

The Method of Personalism

Personalism is a philosophical thought that attempts to understand the unparalleled identity of human's in relation to nature. Dr. King references this ideology with a handwritten note.

Telegram from Reverend Fred L Shuttlesworth to MLK

Friday, July 20, 1962
Cleveland, OH, Albany, GA, Cincinnati, OH, Ohio (OH), Georgia (GA)

Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy assures Dr. King that the nation extends their congratulations and prayer for his success. Reverend Abernathy asserts that as soldiers of freedom, they must "win this battle" for their country and that there "can be no retreat" in the movement.

Letter from Benjamin Mays to MLK

Friday, May 7, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), LIBERIA

Dr. Mays, President of Morehouse College, writes each of the members of the board to seek an honorary degree of Doctor of Humane Letters for Dr. J. Curtis Nixon. Nixon was a lawyer and famous labor mediator.