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"San Francisco, CA"

Letter from Dora McDonald to Cantor Mendelson regarding I Have A Dream

Tuesday, November 2, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY

In this letter, Dora McDonald tells Cantor Mendelson that Dr. King is pleased to know that the Men's Club of Beth Sholom is interested in setting to music excerpts from "I Have a Dream." McDonald refers Mendelson to Clarence Jones, an attorney who handles such matters.

Letter from Richard Boone to Andrew Young

Monday, October 10, 1966
Alabama (AL)

Richard Boone requests for Rev. Andrew Young to contact the executive committee of the SCLC for the possibility of sponsoring him for a scholarship.

A Chronology of Violence and Intimidation in Mississippi Since 1961

Thursday, April 4, 1963
Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

This pamphlet produced by SNCC includes a number of reported violent attacks and intimidation tactics imposed on black Mississippi citizens from January 1, 1961 through February 4, 1964.

Invitation from Mr. and Mrs. Ralph J. Bunche to Dr. and Mrs. MLK

New York, NY

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph J. Bunche invite Dr. and Mrs. King to an informal dinner in the Kew Gardens neighborhood of Queens, New York.

Telegram from MLK to the Fairmont Hotel

Saturday, September 16, 1967
California (CA), San Francisco, CA

Dr. King writes to the Fairmont Hotel in San Francisco California, requesting a reservation of two single rooms.

Why We Can't Wait Book Cover

This draft of Why We Can't Wait contains sketches of a cover, table of contents and edits of the brief description.

Letter from Dinkar Sakrikar to MLK

Friday, September 23, 1966
INDIA

D.Sakrikar writes to solidify the plans for the donation of a bronze statue of Mahatma Gandhi.

Letter From Peggy Mann to MLK Regarding Children's Book

Wednesday, February 1, 1967
New York (NY)

Mann informs King of the recent publication of the children's book "The Street of the Flower Boxes", a book which concerns itself with matters of integration. Mann, requests that Dr. King provide comments or suggested persons of whom may be interested in the literature.

Proposal for Black Independence

Al Shabazz writes up a program for Black independence. The proposal suggests two program options for leaders to choose from. Once the program has been decided the leader would go out and gather the opinion of the masses. Next, the program would implement unconventional education along with employment and survival skills. The program also promotes an independent nation with alliances from those of all races. The program promotes black revolution and the demise of the elite White Supremacist.

Letter from Richard Landau of Antioch College to MLK

Friday, January 29, 1965
Ohio (OH)

Richard Landau, Editor of The Antiochian, writes Dr. King requesting a photograph and "biographical data sheet" for a story about his upcoming appearance as the commencement speaker.

Letter from Edward Taylor to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), VIETNAM

Staff Sergeant Edward Taylor, United States Army, requests Dr. King's assistance or advice in appealing his bar to reenlistment and court martial.

Letter from The Norwegian Church to MLK and Friends

Wednesday, December 9, 1964
NORWAY, Oslo, Norway, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C.

A member of the Norwegian Church extends congratulations to Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize for 1964.

Next Steps In The South

Sunday, July 1, 1956
Kansas (KS), Washington, D.C., Virginia (VA), South Carolina (SC), Cincinnati, OH, North Carolina (NC), Tennessee (TN), Georgia (GA)

The Southern Regional Council publishes a pamphlet that addresses the landmark Brown vs. Board of Education Supreme Court Case and what its implications mean for society. The pamphlet goes on to answer several questions concerning school integration and gives background information on the case and the issues of segregation.

Newspaper Article Concerning Peace in North Vietnam

Tuesday, January 9, 1968
CANADA

This document contains two articles from various newspapers. The first article concerns the call of South Vietnamese Roman Catholic Bishops for the end of U.S. aggression towards North Vietnam. The second article concerns a South Vietnamese Roman Catholic woman who has asked the Pope to become a hostage for a day.

Telegram To Dr. King Awarding A Grant

Thursday, June 29, 1967
Washington, D.C.

In this telegram to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Mr. Roberts of the Contracts Branch US Office of Education informs Dr. King that his proposal entitled, "A Demonstration - Basic Adult Education Project for Urban Negroes," has been approved.

Letter from Leonard L. Brooks to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968
Maine (ME), Atlanta, GA

The Portland campus of the University of Maine requests Dr. King to speak to the student body in support of Choice '68 National Collegiate Presidential Primary.

Official Religious Representatives Attending MLK Funeral

Florida (FL), Los Angeles, CA, North Carolina (NC), New York (NY)

This document contains a list of official religious representatives who will attend Dr. King's funeral.

Original Sin

Dr. King writes a definition of original sin.

Letter from Wilma Fondel to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, ISRAEL

Wilma Fondel expresses interest in attending Dr. King's pilgrimage to Israel.

"Outrage in Alabama"

Sunday, May 5, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Maryland (MD), Baltimore, MD, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference reprinted the article, "Outrage in Alabama," which was originally printed in The New York Times. The article describes violent acts against civil rights demonstrators discussing the flaws within the legal system.

Letter from Esther M. Jackson to McGeorge Bundy

Friday, May 19, 1967
North Carolina (NC), New York (NY), New York, NY

Esther Jackson, a professor at Shaw University, writes George Bundy of the Ford Foundation expressing his dismay in the support of a segregated theatre. Jackson also expresses his disappointment in Dr. King and Roy Wilkins for not recognizing the discrimination taking place in form of cultural separatism.

Operation Breadbasket

Saturday, December 10, 1966
Chicago, IL

Rev. Jesse Jackson meets with National Tea Company and Del Farm Foods representatives to sign an agreement that will create jobs for blacks.

Memorandum Regarding Civil Rights Complaints

New York (NY)

Robert Greene, John Griffin and Ralph Scott make a claim against the state of New York, asserting that they were denied their civil rights and treated unjustly.

Sunday with Martin Luther King, Jr. Radio Sermon on WAAF-AM Chicago, IL

Sunday, April 10, 1966
Chicago, IL, EGYPT, ISRAEL

This copy of Dr. King's segment on WAAF-AM radio, entitled "Sunday with Martin Luther King," explains the plight of the "Negro" in the South as similar to the oppression experienced by the Israelites in the book of Exodus.

Letter from Sargent Shriver to MLK

Monday, August 2, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Florida (FL)

Sargent Shriver, Director for the Office of Economic Opportunity, regretfully informs Dr. King that he will not be able to meet with SCLC's delegates in Birmingham for their convention.

Letter from Catherine Aller to MLK

Wednesday, July 26, 1967
Connecticut (CT), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Catherine Aller took the time to write Dr. King and encourage him to keep pursuing his goals in spite of criticism.

Letter from Harry G. Boyte to Coretta Scott King

Tuesday, October 20, 1964

In this letter, Harry G. Boyte offers his personal admiration to Mrs. King for the "strength [she has] provided Dr. King."

Death

Dr. King records some notes on death.

Letter from a School Teacher to MLK

A Negro special education teacher of a white class asks Dr. King to send her students a letter. She is teaching them about race relations and believes that a letter from Dr. King would be very encouraging.

Walk for Freedom

Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

In this article, Dr. King address the issue of racism occurring in Montgomery. It was here that African Americans, including Dr. King, were victims to humiliation and violent acts because of their race. Dr. King further promote nonviolent protest to combat this civil injustice.